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3 1833 01856 2535 

YEAR BOOK 



State of Indiana 



FOR THE YEAR 



1921 



Compiled and^Published under the Direction of 

WARREN T. McCRAY 

Governor 

BY 

THE LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE BUREAU 

CHARLES KETTLEBOROUGH. Director 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING 

1922 



INTRODUCTION 



The Indiana Year Book was provided for and established by an act 
approved February '^4, 1917, and is compiled, published and distributed 
under the direction of the Governor by the Legislative Reference Bureau. 
The Year Book is designed to present in a concise and compact form the 
essential parts of the annual official reports of all of the state offices, 
boards, commissions, departments, bureaus and institutions, except the 
educational, benevolent and correctional institutions, whose official reports 
are issued separately, together with selected information, data and statis- 
tics concerning the State of Indiana, its people, resources, government, 
o.rops and economic and social conditions. Aside from the institutional re- 
pt>rts and special departmental bulletins of a technical or scientific char- 
^Icter, no official reports or statistical or other state manuals except those 
Aerein contained are published. The first volume of the Year Book was 
issued in 1918; the present volume, which is the fifth of the series, covers 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 1921. Each office, board, commission, 
bureau or department maintained wholly or partly by state funds is re- 
quired to submit a report to the Governor not later than December 1st, 
setting forth the duties, functions, personnel, expenditures, income and 
the character and extent of the achievements and activities of the de- 
partment during the fiscal year last preceding. These reports are then 
edited and standardized for publication by the Legislative Reference 
Bureau. As the Year Book is designed as a manual of the state gov- 
ernment, it is hoped that copies may be made available to public officials, 
newspapers, libraries, schools, colleges and citizens of the state generally. 
As 12,000 copies of the 1921 Year Book have been issued, persons who 
are interested may obtain copies free of charge by applying in person or 
by mail to the Legislative Reference Bureau, Room 335, State House, 
Indianapolis. 

WARREN T. McCRAY, 
Governor of the State of Indiana. 



Ill 



1 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction , iii 

Secretary of State 3 

Securities Commission 4 

Automobile Department 6 

Abstract of Vote : 12 

Auditor of State 18 

Treasurer of State : 48 

State Teachers' Retirement Fund ; 55 

Department of Public Instruction 57 

Division of Teacher Training . 61 

Division of Elementary and High School Inspection 71 

Division of Licensing Teachers 75 

Manuscript Department .* 78 

Division of Vocational Education 80 " 

Division of School Attendance 101 

Division of Statistics and Accounting 103 

State Teachers' Retirement Fund 129 

Public Service Commission 131 

Department of Conservation 208 

Division of Geology . . ; 216 

Division of Entomology 243 

Division of Forestry 264 

Division of Land and Water 274 

Division of Fish and Game 286 

Division of Engineering ; . 330 

Information Service 335 

State Board of Accounts 350 

Board of Certified Accountants 353 

Special Coal and Food Commission 355 

State Library 356 

Indiana Law Library '. 364 

Indiana Historical Commission 365 

Indiana Academy of Science 377 

Board of Pharmacy 379 

Board of Embalmers 382 

Board of Examination and Registration of Nurses 383 

Department of Banking 388 

Building and Loan Department 405 

Loan and Credit Department 424 

Department of Insurance • 429 

Board of Public Printing 437 

V 



VI 

Page 

Board of Election Commissioners 441 

State Board of Agriculture 443 

Industrial Board 456 

Compensation Department 456 

Factory and Building Inspector 504 

Boiler Department 505 

Department of Mines and Mining 506 

Department of Women and Children 563 

Free Employment Service 581 

State Board of Health 583 

Food and Drug Department 604 

Department of Weights and Measures . 618 

Water and Sewage Department 625 

Department of Oil Inspection 633 

Laboratory of Hygiene 635 

Infant and Child Hygiene 642 

Division of Public Health Nursing 661 

Tuberculosis Division 665 

Division of Vital Statistics 670 

Board of Medical Registration and Examination 704 

Board of Dental Examiners 711 

Public Library Commission . . . 713 

Clerk of Supreme and Appellate Courts 760 

State Livestock Sanitary Board 763 

Co-operative Crop Reporting Service 764 

Board of Registration for Engineers and Land Surveyors 816 

Attorney- General 821. 

Corn Growers' Association 830 

Indiana University 833 

Purdue University 842 

Indiana State Normal School > . . . 857 

Board of State Charities 866 

Charitable and Correctional Institutions 876 

Board of Tax Commissioners ; 893 

State Fire Marshal 974 

State Highway Commission 989 

Division of Auditing 992 

Division of Construction 1001 

Division of Maintenance 1028 

Division of Motor Transport 1042 

Adjutant General 1045 

State Board of Pardons 1079 

Joint Purchasing Committee 1081 

Juvenile Probation Officer i083 

Reporter of Supreme Court 1084 

Superintendent of Public Buildings and Property. 1084 

Board of Optometry . . •. 1085 

Legislative Reference Bureau 1086 



Vll 

PART II 

Paj?e 

State Officers, Boards and Commissions 1092 

Congressional Delegation '. 1106 

County Officers 1106 

Deeds and Land Transfers 1122 

Mortgages 1125 

Administration of Justice 1131 

Citizenship and Naturalization 1137 

Marriage and Divorce 1140 

City Officers 1143 

Elections on Commission-Manager Plan 1149 

The General Assembly 1150 

Population of Indiana 1154 

Registration and Elections in Indiana 1160 

Constitution of Indiana 1163 

Distribution of ^axes 1178 

Congressional Township School Fund 1198 



L 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF 



State Officers, Departments, 

Bureaus, Boards and 

Commissions 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1921 



REPORT OF SECRETARY OF STATE 



OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS 

ED JACKSON, Secretary of State. 

P. H. WOLFARD, Deputy Secretary of State. 

FRANK DENIUS, Assistant Deputy Secretary of State. 

ELIZABETH D. MASON, -^Stenographer. 

FLOSSIE G. COLLINS, Cashier. 

The Secretary of State is elected for a term of two years by the 
electors of the state, and his term of office is from November 27, 1920, 
to November 27, 1922. He is ex-officio member of the Bank Chai*ter 
Board, Board of Public Buildings and Grounds, Board of Public Print- 
ing and the Securities Commission. He is charged with the publica- 
tion and sale of the acts of the General Assembly and the drainage 
laws of the state, also the sale of the Supreme and Appellate Court 
reports. 

The principal source of revenue in the Department of State is the 
filing of articles of incorporation of domestic companies and the licens- 
ing of foreign corporations to transact business within the state. The 
amount of fees received from these and other sources for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 1921, will be found in the following table: 

Domestic Corporation Fees $270,093 65 

Foreign Corporation Fees 80,626 96 

Miscellaneous Certificates 231 50 

Notary Public Commissions 4,975 00 

Official Commissions 406 20 

Warrants on Requisitions 285 00 

Trade Mark Registrations 218 00 

Fertilizer Licenses 50 00 

Certified Copies of Records 1,835 60 

Domestic Corporation Reports 4,027 50 

Foreign Corporation Reports 806 00 

Sale of Court Reports 6,872 00 

Lobby Licenses 190 00 

Sale of Acts of Legislature 353 25 

Miscellaneous Fees 1,968 44 

Total Fees Collected $372,939 10 

The following table represents the appropriations made by the 
legislature for the expenses of the office and the amounts expended 
from said appropriations: 

Appropriation Expense Balance 

Salary Secretary of State $6,500 00 $6,500 00 

Salary Deputy Secretary of State 3,000 00 3,000 00 

Salary Assistant Deputy 2,000 00 2,000 00 

Salary Stenographer 1,200 00 1,200 00 

Office Expense 1,000 00 947 17 52 83 

Distribution Public Documents 250 00 250 00 

Distribution Court Reports 250 00 123 86 126 14 

Special Recording 600 00 600 00 



$14,800 00 $14,621 03 $178 91 
(3) 



Year Book 
REPORT OF THE SECURITIES COMMISSION 



THE COMMISSION 

ED JACKSON, Secretary of State. 
U. S. LESH, Attorney-General. 
OR A DAVIE S, Treasurer of State. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT 

MAURICE L. MENDENHALL, Administrator. 
HERMAN B. GRAY, Assistant Administrator. 
HERBERT J. MILLIES, Auditor. 
JENNIE V. LAMB, License Clerk. 
MARGARET FERGUSON, Stenographer. 

At the special session of the Indiana General Assembly, held in the 
summer of 1920, a so-called "Blue Sky Law" was enacted, the law being 
designed to regulate the sale of securities with the hope that the sale 
of worthless sto&ks and bonds might be eliminated. 

New legislation generally admits of improvement, and Indiana's 
first blue sky law was no exception. While this law was a step in the 
right direction, attempts to administer it disclosed many weaknesses 
and proved the law unworkable in many respects. 

Realizing that the law enacted by the special session would not afford 
the protection nor bring about the results expected of it, the Securities 
Commission and its administrative department set about to prepare nec- 
essary amendments. Before starting the work of preparing these amend- 
ments, a careful study was made of all the blue sky laws of the various 
states; much time was spent in going over the rules, regulations and 
court decisions affecting the same. The problems encountered in the 
administration of Indiana's first blue sky law were taken into con- 
sideration. 

The result of all of these investigations was embodied in the amend- 
ments which were prepared and submitted to the legislature by the 
Commission. Eighteen of the twenty-two sections of the Indiana law 
were amended. The effect of the amendments was to give to Indiana 
practically an entirely new blue sky law — one which has been recog- 
nized as one of the best in the United States. 

Indiana's present blue sky law passed both houses of the Gen- 
eral Assembly on third reading without a dissenting vote. Too much 
praise cannot be given the individual members composing this General 
Assembly for the splendid co-operation with this department on that 
occasion. The original law became operative November 13, 1920 — the 
amended law on March 9, 1921. 

THE PURPOSE OF THE LAW 

The public should always bear in mind that the only purpose of 
a blue sky law is to prevent fraud in the sale of securities. In order 
to prevent fraud in this connection, agencies of government have been 



Secretary of State 6 

set up and have been cloaked with sufficient police power to obtain 
this end. 

In administering a law of this character, it is always a problem 
to adopt such rules and regulations, establish such standards, make such 
investigations and demand such information as to give those charged 
with the administration of the law sufficient information to pass upon 
the securities in an intelligent manner, in this manner minimizing the 
opportunity for fraud in the promotion of companies and the sale of 
their securities. The problem also demands that the procedure be such 
that it will not make requirements that will work a serious hardship 
on business or result in the useless disclosure to the public of valuable 
trade secrets and confidential infor-mation. 

In exacting information upon which to make decisions as to whether 
or not the securities should be approved, the department has attempted 
to strike a happy medium and demand such information as would 
safeguard the rights of the public and at the same time not handicap 
legitimate business. 

No securities law, however efficiently administered, can guarantee 
the future of any business. Business depression, lack of orders, bad 
management, fires and numerous other misfortunes may and do cause 
the failures of businesses which have been approved by the most com- 
petent and careful securities commissions, but corporations whose issues 
have been certificated by securities commissions should be free from 
fraud, and the purchaser of these securities should be given an honest 
chance to win on his investment. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The administration of the Indiana law has been handled by a force 
of five persons. In this connection it is interesting to note that the 
Indiana law is administered with less than one-half the number of 
employes engaged in the administration of a law in any other state 
having a like amount of business. Investigations of this subject dis- 
close the fact that as many as fifty-three persons are engaged in the 
administration of securities laws of other states. 

The Indiana securities law is self-sustaining. In fact, besides pay- 
ing the salaries of employes and other general expense, and purchas- 
ing office furniture, typewriters, equipment, stationery, stamps and print- 
ing, the receipts provided a surplus of several thousand dollars, which 
reverted to the general fund of the state treasury at the close of the 
last fiscal year. 

The law provides for a system of application fees which are filed 
with the department by the applicant along with his application. These 
fees are used to pay expenses of the department and any balance so 
remaining after the close of the fiscal year in excess of a $10,000 work- 
ing capital reverts to the general fund of the state treasury. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

An itemized statement of the receipts and disbursements of this 
department from the date the first law became operative, November 13, 
1920, up to and including September 30, 1921, is as follows: 



6 Year Book 

summary of receipts and disbursements for year ending sep- 
TEMBER 30, 1921 

Receipts — 

Filing Fees $32,316 00 

Disbursements — 

Payroll $7,597 04 

Legal proceedings 282 41 

Equipment, office 293 45 

Printing > 862 14 

Postage 252 00 

Stationery, supplies, etc 299 50 

Examinations 30 00 

Balance October 1, 1921 22,717 46 

$32,316 00 $32,316 00 

The total amount of applications received, rejected and approved 
is as follows: 

Number of issuers' and dealers' applications received 533 

Number of issuers' and dealers' applications pending 29 

Number of issuers' and dealers' applications rejected and revoked 78 

Number of agents' and salesmen's applications received 2,027 

Number of agents' and salesmen's applications rejected 20 

Number of companies claiming exemption 234 

The receipts of this department for this year are much less than 
they will be during the coming year on account of the increased fees 
provided for in the Securities Law amended and approved on March 9, 
1921. 



AUTOMOBILE DEPARTMENT 



ROAD FUND 



H. D. McCLELLANi), Manager. 

FRANK A. RICHARDS, Assistant Manager. 

JOHN PARRETT, Auditor. 

C. F. BILLS, Chief Clerk. 

WILLIAM H. PEIRCE, Rating Clerk. 

M. W. PERSHING, Rating Clerk. 

A. E. HAWKINS, Shipping Clerk. 

CLYDE HIRST, Delivery Clerk. 

RAY THOMPSON, Delivery Clerk. 

JOSEPH BROYLES, Clerk. 

INEZ FLECK, Cashier. 

IVA LEONARD, Assistant Cashier. 

MARY L. LESLEY, Trouble Clerk. 

R. R. SINGLETON, Rating Clerk. 

NORMA JOLLIFFE, Stenographer. 

FANNIE STEPHENSON, Rating Clerk. 

MARY NEWELL, Rating Clerk. 

ROSA O'NEAL, Mail Cashier. 

LUELLA GRAHAM, Mail Cashier. 

ANNA WEAVER, File Clerk. 

ELIZABETH KNOTTS, Stenographer. 



Secretary of State 

MARY LOVELL, Notary Public. 
JESSIE KENNEDY, Typist. 
EFFIE McGREW, File Clerk. 
LOIS TRITTIPO, P. D. X. Operator. 



CERTIFICATE OF TITLE DEPARTMENT 



AUTO THEFT FUND 

ROBERT HUMES, Chief State Police. 
L. CUNNINGHAM, Inspector. 
MELVIN LANE, Supply Clerk. 
MAY CURLEY, File Clerk. 
ALMA SCHOTT, Typist. 
' NONA TOMPKINS, Notary Public. 
ALICE WIRTS, Typist. 
JENNIE OBTOVER, Typist. 
LELA WACHSTETTER, Typist. 
MARIE STEINMETZ, Typist. 
LOLA RONK, Typist. 
HELEN NEFF, Typist. 
MILDRED SIMPSON, Typist. 
ELSIE HOMAN, Typist. 
MARJORY PHILLIPS, Typist. 
INEZ WORDEN, Stenographer. 
RAYMOND FELD, Stenographer. 
JANE LAWTON, Mail Cashier. 
MILDRED HOOKER, Mail Cashier. 
NAOMI GARRIOTT, Mail Cashier. 
LILLIAN BERKLEY, Number Clerk. 
PHOEBE J. BONNER, Information Clerk. 

REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

Every person who is the owner of a motor vehicle is required to 
register with the Secretary of State by making application on blanks 
furnished for that purpose, giving his name, post office and street or 
rural address and the county in which he lives. He must give the 
name of his motor vehicle, year in which it was made, model, engine 
number, serial number, number of cylinders, size of bore, horse power, 
and the number of his certificate of title. He is then required to sign 
the application and have his signature acknowledged by a notary public 
or other officer authorized to administer oaths. A certificate is given 
the owner as evidence of ownership of the license, and the same is to 
be displayed in a metal container to be furnished by the Secretary of 
State for fee of fifty cents. The container must be attached in the 
driver's compartment of the motor vehicle, or carried in the tool box 
or other receptacle in a motorcycle. Upon payment of the proper fee, 
metal license plates are furnished the owner, which must be displayed 
on both the front and the rear of motor vehicle. All licenses expire on 
the 31st day of December and must be renewed annually. 



8 Year Book 

License numbers preceded by the letter "M" are issued to manu- 
facturers and dealers and are to be used on all cars used for demon- 
strating and testing purposes only. Service cars and motor vehicles 
used by individuals for personal use require the regular license plates. 

Licenses are issued for motorcycles in the same manner, the appli- 
cant giving a description of the motorcycle on proper blanks furnished 
for that purpose. However, only one license plate is issued for each 
motorcycle and the number is preceded by the letter "X." 

Chauffeurs' licenses are issued upon receipt of proper application 
accompanied by two photographs of the applicant. The application must 
also be signed by two disinterested persons, certifying as to the good 
character of the applicant. 

Licenses may be transferred from one car to another when owned 
by the same person, but under no circumstances are they transferable 
from one owner to another. 

In case a license plate is lost, stolen, mutilated or destroyed, a 
duplicate may be secured by making application on proper blank. Fee 
$1.00. 

Rebates will be granted on licenses for the unearned portion of 
the fee, when the motor vehicle has been disposed of and the owner 
does not desire to have the plates transferred to another car, provided 
the license plates are returned to the Secretary of State marked "for 
rebate" and accompanied by properly executed application for rebate. 

Two file systems are maintained for the convenience of the public, 
one being numerical according to numbers of licenses issued, and the 
other alphabetically arranged by counties. 

The 1919 General Assembly amended Section 6 of the 1913 Motor 
Vehicle Law, thereby providing a separate classification for trucks and 
trailers. Application for trucks and delivery car licenses should be 
made on a distinctive form for that purpose and the fees are applied 
according to the carrying capacity of the truck or delivery car. Trailer 
licenses are secured by application on a distinctive form and the fees 
are based on the carrying capacity of the trailer. No truck or trailer 
of more than seven and one-half tons capacity is permitted on the high- 
ways of the state. 

The legislature also passed an act creating a State Highway Com- 
mission, providing for the construction, reconstruction, maintenance, re- 
pair and control of public highways. This act also provides that the 
net revenue derived from license fees shall, on and after January 1, 1920, 
be turned over to the State Highway Fund to be used for road con- 
struction and repairs. 

The following table gives the schedule of annual registration and 
license fees applicable to motor vehicles according to horsepower and 
tonnage capacity, agreeable to an act of the General Assembly of 1921: 

PASSENGER CARS 

Electrics (other than trucks) $5 00 

Less than 25-horsepQwer 5 00 

25-horsepower and less than 40-horsepower 8 00 

40-horsepower and less than 50-horsepower 20 00 

50-horsepower or more k 30 00 



Secretary of State 



TRUCKS 

Less than one ton capacity %(i 00 

1 ton capacity and less than 2 tons 15 00 

2 tons capacity and less than S^^ tons 25 00 

3% tons capacity and less than 5 tons 50 00 

5 tons capacity and not exceeding 7% tons 75 00 

No truck of more than 7^ tons capacity will be permitted on the highways of 
the state. 

TRAILERS 

Less than one ton capacity $3 00 

1 ton capacity and less than 2 tons 6 00 

2 tons capacity and less than 5 tons 10 00 

5 tons capacity and not exceeding 7% tons 20 00 

No trailer of more than 7% tons capacity will be permitted on the highv/ays of 
the state. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Manufacturers' and dealers' licenses $25 00 

Additional duplicate dealer's license plates, per set 1 00 

Motorcycle license 2 00 

Chauffeur's license 2 00 

Duplicate lost, stolen or mutilated license plates 1 00 

The above fees apply to all applications except for duplicate license 
plates, made prior to August 1st of each year. After August 1st the 
license fee is one-half the above rates. 

AUTOMOBILE LICENSE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements of the Road Fund Nine 
Months Period from January 1st to September 30th, 1921. 

RECEIPTS 

Passenger cars , $1,862,969 66 

Trucks ' 389,862 50 

Dealers' licenses 36,875 00 

Motorcycle licenses 13,496 00 

Chauffeurs' licenses ,. 17,885 00 

Trailer licenses 6,093 50 

Duplicate license plates 13,129 00 

Transfers 36,914 50 

*Notary fees 1,945 00 

Gross receipts '. $2,379,170 16 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Fixed Charges 

Tags and badges $61,396 95 

Rebates 11,792 29 

— $73,189 24 

Current Expenses 

Salaries $28,811 83 

Postage 18,066 91 

Printing and supplies 5,872 26 

Office fixtures 3.354 51 

Office expense 964 42 

57,609 93 

Total disbursements $130,259 17 

Issuing cost of licenses, not including Fixed Charges, 13.85c each. 

♦Notary fees, previously turned into the General Fund, were made a part of the 
Road Fund by Act of 1921 General Assembly. 



10 Year Book 

total receipts and disbursements and distribution 

Automobile License Department — 1914 to 1921 

Year Receipts Disbursements Distribution 

1914 $432,301 57 $51,201 56 $381,104 02 

1915 598,113 72 51,640 00 546,473 72 

1916 825,847 18 69,149 57 756,697 61 

1917 1,109,113 26 68.756 95 1,040,356 31 

1918 1,307,134 31 86,301 87 1.220,832 44 

1919 1.568,657 44 107.214 27 1,461,443 17 

1920 2.029.103 00 110.046 08 *1.919,798 67 

1921 $2,379,170 16 $130,259 17 $2,305,545 46 

Distribution was made to the State Highway Fund for 1920 and 
1921. 

NUMBER OF LICENSES ISSUED. 

1914 to 1921 

Year Automobiles Trucks Dealers Motorcycles Chauffeurs Trailers 

1914 66,410 511 10,403 2,769 

1915 96,615 727 11,225 3,099 

1916 139,117 997 11,217 4,362 

1917 192,195 1,121 10,315 5,063 

1918 227,160 990 9,112 4,642 

1919 277,255 1,192 8,895 6,4l0 

1920 294,338 31.654 1.537 8.664 9,382 

*1921 348,820 41.609 1.547 7.292 10,191 1,761 

CERTIFICATE OF TITLE DEPARTMENT 

The General Assembly of 1921 enacted a law providing that no 
certificate of registration of any motor vehicle or license plates shall 
be issued by the Secretary of State, unless the applicant be granted an 
official Certificate of Title for such motor vehicle. Application for 
certificate of title shall be on blank form provided for that purpose, 
and shall be acknowledged before a notary public or other officer em- 
powered to administer oaths, and shall contain a full description of 
the motor vehicle and of any liens or encumbrances upon said motor 
vehicle. The Secretary of State shall use reasonable diligence in ascer- 
taining whether or not the facts stated in said application for certificate 
of title are true, and if satisfied that the applicant is the lawful owner 
or is otherwise entitled to have same registered in his name, he shall 
thereupon issue an appropriate certificate of title. Said certificate of 
title shall contain the name and address of the applicant and a full 
description of the motor vehicle together with a statement of any liens 
or encumbrances which the application may show to be thereon. Space 
is provided on the reverse side of the certificate of title for assignment 
of the motor vehicle when the same is sold or traded. The fee for 
such certificate of title is fifty cents. The certificate of title is valid 
so long as the motor vehicle is owned by the person whose name appears 
on such certificate. When the motor vehicle is disposed of, the holder 

*Period from January 1 to September 30, 1920. 
$Fiscal year from October 1, 1920. to September 30. 1921. 
$Period from January 1 to September 30. 1921. 
^Number issued at end of fiscal year. September 30, 1921. 



Secretary of State 11 

of certificate of title shall assign same to the purchaser of the motor 
vehicle, and the purchaser shall make a new application for certificate 
of title and forward same to the automobile department with the assigned 
title. The fee for such transfer of title is fifty cents. The fees collected 
from the issuing of certificates of title are used for the administration 
of the act arid the recovery of stolen automobiles and the apprehension 
of thieves. 

The following receipts and disbursements have been made from the 
Certificate of Title Department for the six months period from June 
1st to September 30, 1921 : 

Receipts $365,973 75 

Disbursements 108.444 73 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 $257,529 02 

MOTOR VEHICLE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Section 6 of the Certificate of Title Act provides that the Secretary 
of State, with the approval of the Governor, is authorized to appoint 
necessary deputies, in addition to the present officers of the law to carry 
out the provisions of the certificate of title act, who shall have power 
to investigate and follow up any auto theft matters or other violations 
of the said act, and shall have all authority of peace officers relative to 
the provisions of the certificate of title act. They also are required to 
assist in ascertaining whether the owners and operators of motor vehicles 
are carrying the license tags which they are by law required to carry. 

The state motor vehicle police number sixteen members who are 
salaried as provided by the certificate of title act. Eleven additional 
members of the state motor vehicle police department are attached to 
municipal police departments and do not draw salaries from the state. 

Under the operation of the state motor vehicle police for the period 
from July 15th until September 30th, fifty-two motor vehicles have been 
recovered and returned to the owners in this state. Twenty-three motor 
vehicles have been recovered and returned to owners outside the state. 

Forty-four prisoners have been arrested by the state motor vehicle 
police and all pleaded guilty to the charge of vehicle taking. Five of 
the prisoners have been turned over to the federal authorities. 

The State Motor Vehicle Police Department was holding twelve 
motor vehicles on September 30, 1921, the engine numbers having been 
defaced or mutilated, and for which the department is endeavoring to 
locate the owners. Two motor vehicles are held for which it has been 
impossible to locate the owners. 



12 



Year Book 



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^i&s ^--a".;-! t-iii ti^:i^ 

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pqpqmo OOOO oQQQ QQQH 






^'6B6 



Secretary of State 



13 



cot— OS CO CO »c o 



•^ cot- OS 
T»l C<I(Mt- 
CCXMOIM 



>Tj< OS i-H O OOO -# 
• t- CO t- O OS c^ oo 

.<M OS to OOi-l OS r-( 



Ir-lj-i-r^ C<I 



t—COeOO CO'flGClM* -^rH-tf-H I— -fOOS 

t-oeoc<i oo^t^ ooi-^co CO to 'Ml- 

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(M".-r (m" IC ^ rt'^".-," ^' 



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CO 'C CI -H ^^ ^o iC •— 
I^OSir5-»« iCI-C-l^ 



m to lo o 

t- 00 CO OS 
CDlO Tj< t- 



t- t-l-H to 



co^t-00 <Mt— rncq 

U505CO<M CQ -^ lO UO 
CO CO >0 ■<*< W5 to OS Ttl 



oqco-^t— (MtOC^CO iMi-lt--^ 



CO I-H C<1 



•■*< CO t— CO CI to 1- CO O CI 



ooosooea eocooooo os- 



00 CO to lO 



»C to OS CJ 

^ CO CO cq 

00^ OS <M 



CI csi OS i-H oseocqto 
tot-co»c cqcoosio 

,— I 1— 1 t— OS OS t— to OS 



•*00>OO ■*< 
OS 00 to t— O ' 
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cqcqocq 



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O •* CM 00 
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t- COiOOO 



t- -"ti cq t- 
•* cq T*< csi 

CQ CO 00 to 



llO T}4 U0t-OSTt( ■^■*tO>0 tOi-HCqi-C •<*( .-H t- CO 

COi-H Cq to i-H T-H T-H 



>«CO OO-fCMCO t-co^co 



1,609 

1,200 

990 

1,207 


1,032 
1,563 
1,728 
1,608 


CvT 


822 
2,126 
1,914 

211 


2,141 

1,017 

718 

1,865 


4,557 
709 
679 

1,888 


1,053 

1,341 

1,344 

544 


-HtOOOO 


OOt-t-CO 


C1-^r»<t- 

gKS55 


iiiS 


1,123 

1,240 

742 

517 


iiil 


^tooo^ 


3,212 

1,449 

588 

2,294 


6,345 

1,144 

197 

1,066 


Iiil 


Cq OS 00 00 


iOCJt-t- 


657 

304 

1,077 

1.223 


1,474 

1,068 

960 

1,043 




464 

2,115 

773 

633 


742 
1,912 
1,855 

182 


2,189 
925 
645 

1,675 


3,389 
620 
650 

1,518 


1,015 

1,129 

1,254 

377 


658 

249 

676 

1,439 


547 

783 

1,378 

326 


481 

439 

1,022 

993 


■*oOi-Heo 

•*^00>O 
t- CO CO OS 


1,228 

1,100 

976 

675 


COCdt-OS 
«-~C<ICDO 

CO-*COTtl 


CO 00 OS CO 


2,970 

1,480 

633 

2,462 


8,076 

1,159 

197 

1,462 


lOCq^t-lO 


OS -^eo 


iiil 


649 

640 

1,267 

1,305 


!-!■!■!■ 


!-!-!■! 


cq^ osco 

(M 


893 
2,259 
2,054 

228 


2,195 
998 
791 

2,024 


4,778 
713 
747 

1,746 


1,153 
1,456 
1,381 

447 


837 

275 

788 

1,647 


Ot-OS^ 


561 

466 

1,407 

1,203 


sill 


1,305 
1,261 

846 
484 


§ilE 


£2 00 1- OS 


cqicicco 


6,794 

1,176 

170 

1,385 


416 

1,083 

740 

469 


i=li 


SmS^ 


661 

684 

955 

1,155 


1,608 
1,170 
1,055 
1,136 


702 
1,544 
1,576 
1,608 


CO 00 OS 00 

^eoSo 
cq" 


801 
1,915 
1,963 

199 


1,994 
943 
730 

1,864 


3,547 
657 
728 

1,632 


1,097 

1,270 

1,331 

432 


740 

266 

748 

1,529 


iill 


520 

415 

1,222 

1,074 


t-T^tocq 


1,765 

1,411 

1,030 

656 


iiil 


>OOOSTt< 


3,777 

1,700 

685 

2,644 


8,976 

1,257 

213 

1,569 




OS tHtJ* 


sill 


728 

746 

1,246 

1,454 


iiii 


432 
1,037 
1,271 
1,242 


TjtOSUSUi 


581 
1,450 
1,227 

142 


1,822 
708 
487 

1,035 


2,271 
520 
593 

785 


oooocq 
oo^ocq 


559 

231 

604 

1,238 


339 

833 

1,353 

207 


OOO to 00 

cocqt-t^ 


«oo^® 


2,176 
2,000 
1,412 
1,107 


OOOOi-HtO 


ii.ii 


4,866 
1,986 
1,039 
3,761 


11,309 

1,460 

370 

2,664 


821 
1,981 
1,225 

706 


C5r-H tOI^- 


lOtOOCO 

COiOrfOS 


930 

962 

1,886 

1,947 






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14 



Year Book 



1 


o 


1,199 

1,495 

2,836 

604 

2,006 
1,275 

487 
487 

1,024 
589 
849 

1,146 

287 
1,028 

756 
2,998 

2,115 

733 

1,324 

1,771 

1,518 

1,190 

1,284 

572 


1 


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rHrtOOU? 05(MlO»0 OSlOOOi-l (M0t-03_ 0_t- fO l>-_^ ■* CO__(M_>0 

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eoi«ir-oo i-HOcqcD i^thcoos coeococo oocDkC-i '^rHooc^ 

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1 


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(MTt^CO^ CSIOS^OT OOOI-ilO i*<0«?^ OOCO^enCO ICOJIOI^ 
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CO 00 O »0 COt^lCOO 1— 1 O OS OO CO CD 05 O 00 lO O lO <M 05 •* Tfl 
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13 

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1 


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T-l C^ 05 CD 05 CO ■* 05 O 05 t^ CO 05 05 >— 1 CO »0 CO O CO 1— ICOOOi— 1 

.-HO_io_ic t-co^-* o>ooo-=; (Moi^-o ,-Hr-Tt<oo co__o^^__co 

^■■th"(m" 1-^r^ r^ ,-r T-T Co" CsT ^^ ^"^■"^■■ 


^ 


M OS 00 03 OOOOt^O CO OS CO OS OOOOSOO CO Cq 1— 1 1— 1 lO <M C<1 00 

^^yiji ^sg;s S5??§§ ^^^^^ ^^^^ sssj^ 


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1 


^§§§ ss?gs ssss sns^s gggg ^§^s 

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1— 1 CO (M t^ (N ■<* »0 !>. O »0 (M 1— 1 00 1— 1 1— 1 tH (M CO CO 1-H 1— I CCl (M C<1 
CqOOlOCO 10-*00-CH CD05Tt<C0 ooi-~cdco t-t^O-* C0lr-'*00 
i-H_CO_OS_^CO i-HI^^COt^ COTtflN^ -^OSOt^ OSt^COt^ COCOIMOO 

^ .-H CO CM r-T <N ^^ ^'CM i-T (m'i-T ^"^ 


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1-dld ^iJI glll g^lJ Jill l»^l 
S&^i Mii ll^l gllt^ ^111 0i'i 



Secretary of State 



15 



J 

^ 


Number 

of 

Electors 

Who 

Voted. 


^ 


3,033 
6,021 
2,258 
1,879 

953 
2,670 

593 
2,176 

3,778 
1,516 
2,092 
2,739 

1^734 
2,762 
1,845 
1.418 

2,402 
3,318 
2,613 
2,956 

1,314 
1,795 
1,621 
1,521 

1,500 
1,697 
3.018 
3.268 


5 

1 


i 


1 


O500'-(io oocoooTfi ioc2GO<£) oooi^i^ oco'Cco t^ooom 'Xm (o^a 

s§§;2 s?5^s s.sss ^§q^ ??§S§ ^32gS ss^s 
(m'co^'"^'" t-T rH (m" ^"^'" ,-r.-r .-T^-M ^" — 'ci* 


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t-cococo -*t^u5^ ooT^cno 05Tj.Kc^) r-u^SS — SSS SJ^SS 
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pg 


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1 
1 


o 


1 


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1 


1 


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o 


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lOT»Ht-^Tt< r-l O T-l c:i C<1 M CO C^ 00 Tti OO TfH OJCOiOCO CO ^H M O C5 OO CO c^ 
OO-^C^tO OOOt^OJ C^COCQO ^tOC^lC Tj<00OTti oocs^Sj Jo^^SS 
l>^lCI>._^lO_ l:^0_-*t--^ 0^^_^>0(M ICCO^O OOOCOU5 0->*<CO-^ (MC^Ot^ 
(N-*T-li-l C^ rt co" i-H T-l C<r (Mt-Ti-H ,^'c^'co'-^" ^"_rrtrt" ^^c-ioi 


1 


1 

to 


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^ 


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oo 1— 1 ■* t— 00 >— 1 -^ oq to CO (M OS CO 00 OS »-i i— ioo>oos ooosooo eocooto 
^.'^."I'^l «oo_Tj4i>.^ i>._o^^_^o_ »cc<^_(^a^o_ co_(m^(m_^_ oscocoo i4i-;osS 


pS 


1 


SS^^ g§S§ ^i§^g ?S^SS gg^Sn SS^SS ^^2j§ 

T-HCOlCC^ 1-H .* (M COCO->*CO rt(MCO<M Tjlt-. cq Tt* M M — i C^ (M CO 00 CO 


1 


;! 


1 


OSOSCOt^ COCOOOCO t^r^COUS t-OI^~CD Tj-lO^cO 00CO.-1CO COCQlOtO 
■t— iCflCSt^ O CO 00 C^ CO 00 -* OS (M 00 00 Tti -^ Tfl ..*! CM OO »0 ■.# ■* »-i Tf< 00 >0 
C0l0_0_'-H_ COCO_COCO_^ '^^'*'^„"'. -^O^O^OO CM00_O_Q0 t:^<NO_t^ OSCSC0_.*_ 

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1 


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■^<mm Smmo oooo oQQO CQQw P^^^fe p=<ooo 



16 



Year Book 



H 


Number 

of 

Electors 

Who 

Voted. 


2,666 
1,974 
1,630 
2,344 

2,608 
3,159 
2,778 
2,413 

1,372 
2,837 
1,687 
1,239 

1,470 
3,164 
3,197 

744 

7,165 
2,890 
1,573 
5,017 

14,556 

1,980 

996 

3,588 

1,759 
2,853 
2,348 
1,010 


1 


o 


1,672 
1,183 
1,052 
1,212 

849 
1,693 
1,690 
1,685 

642 

2,346 • 

898 

665 

837 
2,187 
2,099 

203 

2,444 

1,268 

810 

1,981 

4,195 
841 
733 

1,751 

1,115 

1,442 

1,380 

465 


5 


734 
694 
447 
936 

1,545 

1,183 

883 

559 

534 
372 

622 

477 

556 

745 
824 
466 

3,077 

1,302 

631 

2,468 

8,108 

1,063 

208 

1,415 

478 

1,130 

789 

457 


1 


1 


1,923 
1,417 
1,129 
1,583 

1,552 
1,898 
1,867 
1,901 

710 
2,405 
1,112 

821 

1,025 

2,416 

2,285 

276 

3,226 

1,557 

957 

2,888 

7,774 

1,074 

772 

2,215 

1,233 

1,814 

1,726 

623 


S 


460 
428 
384 
499 

764 

1,012 

690 

315 

471 
335 
384 
303 

349 
481 
636 
374 

2,673 

1,038 

433 

1,577 

4,860 
825 
155 

884 

361 
705 
405 
289 


,£3 


o 


2,040 
1,514 
1,131 
1,695 

1,637 
2,389 
1,943 
2,011 

847 
2,470 
1,199 

843 

1,087 

2,581 

2,457 

336 

4,002 
2,122 
1,053 
3,167 

8,421 

1,402 

814 

2,525 

1,316 

2,076 

1,862 

676 


>^ 


325 
314 
375 
357 

638 
493 
625 
219 

297 
259 
311 
266 

254 
335 
454 
316 

1,758 
560 
314 

1,268 

3,078 
504 
116 
559 

259 
433 
258 
239 


1 


1 


2,150 
1,596 
1,238 
1,822 

1,815 
2,431 
2,161 
2,040 

988 
2,531 
1,312 

914 

1,178 

2,647 

2,716 

376 

3,962 
2,156 
1,139 
3,517 

9,029 

1,509 

849 

2,687 

1,378 

2,213 

1,940 

786 


1 


235 
235 

248 
224 

930 
414 
414 
190 

168 
199 
200 
198 

173 
271 

287 
281 

1,817 
519 
256 

1,012 

2,548 

391 

76 

419 

217 
346 
202 
134 


.a 


^ 


2,032 
1,531 
1,245 
1,765 

1,666 
2,280 
2,102 
1,970 

891 
2,443 
1,190 

905 

1,086 

2,651 

2,445 

345 

2,948 

1,667 

957 

3,035 

6,989 

1,162 

816 

2,481 

1,284 

1,934 

1,814 

741 


tS 


333 
304 
245 
310 

618 
581 
458 
244 

257 
251 
297 
191 

253 
348 
430 
294 

2,537 
952 
454 

1,383 

4,588 
743 
107 
604 

325 
638 
311 
163 


1 


^ 


1,646 
1,176 
1,048 
1,295 

865 
1,762 
1,695 
1,710 

712 

2,283 

997 

726 

856 
2,109 
2,004 

214 

1,855 

1,122 

688 

2,039 

4,645 
707 
729 

1,982 

1,045 

1,462 

1,449 

435 


1 


706 
655 

424 

787 

1,484 

1,088 

853 

507 

435 
400 
509 
380 

496 
806 
903 
438 

3,960 

1,474 

726 

2,382 

7,219 

1,181 

192 

1,138 

561 

1,060 

664 

481 




02 

o 
o 


Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks .N/ 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko 

Lagrange 

Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison. 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Newton 



Secretary of State 



17 



I 



1,852 

360 

1,337 

2,053 


1,717 
1,405 
1,783 
1,248 


1,330 
1,237 
2.622 
2.766 


2,059 

2,439 

6,934 

973 


3,375 

1,970 

908 

1.104 


2.043 

973 

2.701 

1,948 


740 
1.941 
1.431 
5.407 


3.167 
1.345 
1.820 
2.301 


3,545 
2,042 
1.878 
1.437 


00(Ml:-io 




558 

520 

1,105 

1,271 


1,255 

1,422 

3.078 

585 


2.076 

1.312 

365 

521 


ligs. 


321 
1.158 

583 
3,160 


1,718 

788 

.415 

1.832 


1.585 

1,167 

1,241 

691 


|S|| 


USi*lOSTt< 


675 

639 

1,393 

1,202 


634 

822 

3,212 

291 


Ills 


790 

267 

1,497 

660 


340 

622 

709 

1.803 


1.352 
395 
336 
404 


1.508 
658 
525 
628 


984 

278 

825 

1,675 


0__0_i«-<ti 


641 

806 

1,634 

1,558 


1.357 

1,569 

3.697 

682 


2,322 

1.596 

609 

640 


OCOCOtH 


497 
1,354 

971 
3.458 


2.468 

838 

1.500 

1.940 


2.014 

1,597 

1.444 

940 


i^ii 


CO CO <M CO 
VSt^lr-OO 

-*(M_US 


«0(Mt^OS 


523 

617 

2,614 

184 


sl^S 


458 

226 

1.212 

341 


158 

453 

296 

1.447 


-<*<COC<l(M 


1.073 
294 
321 
389 


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1.016 

1.061 

1.620 

719 


681 

913 

1,730 

1,805 


1,410 

1,942 

5,561 

699 


2,572 

1,636 

661 

754 


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505 
1.391 

982 
3.701 


2.593 

986 

1,532 

2,023 


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1.125 

1,647 

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2.039 

5,590 

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2,698 

1,696 

696 

855 


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1.423 
1,011 
3,806 


2,677 
1,068 
1.594 
2.076 


2,568 
1.572 
1,581 
1.113 


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1,871 

1,836 


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1,848 

3,208 

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1,413 

1.548 


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1.199 

917 
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1,486 
1,442 
1,021 


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352 

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170 

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2—19930 



REPORT OF AUDITOR OF STATE 



OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

WILLIAM G. OLIVER, Auditor of State. 
EDWARD A. REMY, Deputy Auditor. 
L. C. JOHNSON, Audit Clerk. 
GREENBERRY G. LOWE, Settlement Clerk. 
LELA A. YOUNG, Stenographer and Clerk. 
C. CLAUDE ROSENBARGER, Land Clerk. 

DUTIES OF THE AUDITOR OF STATE 

Section 151 of the Constitution of Indiana provides that there shall 
be elected by the voters of the State an auditor who shall hold his office 
for two years. He shall perform such duties as may be enjoined by 
law; and no person shall be eligible to serve as auditor more than four 
years in any period of six years. 

The Auditor of State has numerous duties and responsibilities aside 
from the work of the Auditing Department. He is ex-officio Land Com- 
missioner, a member of the State Board of Finance, the State Charter 
Board, the State Board of Accounts, the Board of Public Buildings and 
Grounds, the Board of Public Printing, and the Board of Appointment, 
which board appoints the members of the State Board of Health. 

The Auditor of State is required to keep and state all accounts be- 
tween the State of Indiana and the United States, or any State or 
Territory, or any individual or public officer of this State indebted to 
the State, or intrusted with the collection, disbursement or management 
of any moneys, funds or interest arising therefrom, belonging to the 
State, of every character and description whatsoever, when the same 
are derivable from or payable into the State Treasury. 

Examine and liquidate the accounts of all county treasurers and 
other collectors and receivers of all state revenues^ taxes, tolls and in- 
comes, levied or collected by any act of the General Assembly, and 
payable into the State Treasury, and certify the amount or balance to 
the Treasurer of State. 

Keep fair, clear, distinct and separate accounts of all the revenues 
and incomes of the State; and also of all expenditures, disbursements 
and investments thereof, showing the particulars of every expenditure, 
disbursement and investment. 

Examine, adjust and settle the accounts of all public debtors, for 
debts due the State Treasury, and require all such persons, or their 
legal representatives, who may be indebted to the State for moneys 
received or otherwise, and who shall not have accounted therefor, to 
settle their accounts. ^ , 

Examine and liquidate the claims of all persons against the State^ 
in cases where provisions for the payment thereof shall have been made 
by law; and when no such provisions, or an insufficient one, has I'ier) 



Auditor of State 19 

made, to examine the claim, and report the facts, with his opinion 
thereon, to the legislature; and no allowance shall be made to refund 
moneys from the treasury without his statement either for or against 
the justice of the claim. 

Institute and prosecute, in the name of the State, all proper suits 
for the recovery of any debts, moneys or property of the State, or for 
the ascertainment of any right or liability concerning the same. 

Direct and superintend the collection of all moneys due the State, 
and employ counsel to prosecute suits, instituted at his instance, on be- 
half of the State. 

Draw warrants on the treasurer for all moneys directed by law to 
be paid out of the treasury to public officers, or for any other object 
whatsoever, as the same may become payable, and every warrant shall 
be properly numbered. 

Furnish to the Governor, on his requisition, information in writing 
upon any subject relating to the duties of the office of auditor. 

Superintend the fiscal concerns of the State and their management 
in the manner required by law, and furnish the proper forms to 
assessors, treasurers, collectors and auditors of counties. 

Keep and preserve all public books, records, papers, documents, 
vouchers, and all conveyances, leases, mortgages, bonds, and all securities 
for debts, moneys or property, and accounts and property, of any de- 
scription, belonging or appertaining to his office and also to the State, 
where no other provision is made by law for the safe-keeping of the 
same. 

Suggest plans for the improvement and management of the public 
revenues, funds and incomes. 

Report and exhibit to the General Assembly, at its biennial meeting, 
a complete statement of the revenues, taxables, funds, resources, in- 
comes and property of the State, known to his office, and of the public 
revenues and expenditures of the two preceding fiscal years, with a de- 
tailed estimate of the expenditures to be defrayed from the treasury 
for the ensuing two years,, specifying therein each object of expenditure, 
and distinguishing between each object of expenditure and between such 
as are provided for by permanent or temporary appropriations, and 
such as require to be provided for by law, and showing also the sources 
and means from which all such expenditures are to be defrayed. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF BALANCES, RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

A detailed statement of the work of the Auditing Department of 
the office of the Auditor of State for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1921, giving a condensed exhibit of the balances in the state treasury 
by funds at the beginning of the fiscal year, October 1, 1920, also the 
amounts received and disbursed from the several funds during the year 
and the balance on hand at the close of business September 30, 1921. 



20 Year Book 

BALANCE BY FUNDS OCTOBER 1, 1920 

General Fund $1,052,252 28 

Educational Institution Fund 198,853 57 

Vocational Educational Fund ^ 19,838 54 

State Debt Sinking Fund 254,518 10 

Common School Fund Principal 733 65 

School revenue for tuition 149,966 60 

Fire Marshal Fund 49,066 22 

Hydrophobia Fund 12,575 74 

Unclaimed estates 44,922 90 

Highway Fund 2,784,605 11 

Sale of state lands 1,064 66 

Total $4,568,397 37 



RECEIPTS BY FUNDS FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

General Fund , $7,731,993 61 

Benevolent Institution Fund 2,814,817 70 

Educational Institution Fund 1,600,102 91 

Vocational Education Fund 515,418 68 

State Debt Sinking Fund 348.460 02 

Common School Fund principal 9,924 34 

Sale of state lands 10,555 31 

Unclaimed estates 3,696 97 

School revenue for tuition 3,896,916 01 

Permanent Endowment Fund interest 45,871 72 

Road Fund 2,474,258 03 

Fire Marshal Fund 68,657 52 

Hydrophobia Fund 20,955 95 

Highway Fund 6,752,900 23 

Auto Theft Fund 366,417 40 

Soldiers' Memorial Fund 180,425 20 

Total $26,841,371 60 



DISBURSEMENTS BY FUNDS FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

General Fund $8,615,641 95 

Benevolent Institution Fund '. 2,814,817 70 

Educational Institution Fund 1,491,122 77 

Vocational Education Fund : 477,508 51 

State Debt Sinking Fund 262.978 12 

Sale state lands 173 50 

Unclaimed estates 1.394 78 

School revenue for tuition 3,819,435 16 

Permanent Endowment Fund interest 45,871 72 

Road Fund 2,474.258 03 

Fire Marshal Fund 46,999 67 

Hydrophobia Fund 17,246 84 

Highway Fund 8,244,071 16 

Auto Theft Fund 108,758 15 

Total $28,420,278 06 



Auditor of State 



21 



STATEMENT OF NET RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, 
SHOWING ADVANCEMENTS AND TRANSFERS 



ADVANCEMENTS AND TRANSFERS 



GENERAL FUND 



Governor's Emergency and Contingent Fund 

To Revolving Fund, Conservation Department 

To Emergency Compensation Fund 

Governor's Civil and Military Contingent Fund 

To Revolving Fund, Conservation Department 

Conservation Department, from Fish and Game Fund. . 

To salaries and expense account 

State Board of Charities, transportation 

Attorney-General, advancement by board of finance.... 

Appropriation to vocational education 

From Benevolent Institution Fund 

From Hydrophobia Fund, inheritance tax 



Disbursements 

$10,702 06 



10,000 OC 

8,369 17 

900 00 
2,000 00 
11.052 11 



Totals 



$43,023 34 



Receipts 

$5,000 00 
63 54 

10,000 00 

8,369 17 

900 00 

2,000 00 

2,814,817 70 
1,858 35 

$2,843,008 76 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION FUND 

Transfer Warrant — 

To General Fund 2,814,817 70 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FUND 



Transfer Warrant — 
From General Fund 



11,052 11 



ROAD FUND 

Transfer Warrant — 

To Highway Commission Fund 2,305,545 

From Auto Theft Fund 



24,958 67 



HIGHWAY COMMISSION FUND 
Transfer Warrant — 

From Road Fund 

From Hydrophobia Fund, inheritance tax 

Advanced to L. H. Wright $100,000 00 

Less checks issued by L. H. Wright, 
not reimbursed by Auditor of State. 62,771 76 



37,228 24 



2,305.545 46 
100 20 



37,228 24 



AUTO THEFT FUND 



Transfer Warrant — 
To Road Fund 



24,958 67 



STATE DEBT SINKING FUND 

Transfer Warrant — 

From Governor's Emergency Contingent Fund 



5,638 52 



HYDROPHOBIA FUND 

Transfer Warrant — 

To General Fund, inheritance tax 

To Highway Commission Fund, inheritance tax, . 
* To Common School Fund Principal , 



1,858 35 

100 20 

9,575 74 



COMMON SCHOOL FUND PRINCIPAL 

Transfer Warrant — 

From Hydrophobia Fund 



Total advancements and transfers $5,237,107 70 



9,575 74 



$5,237,107 70 



22 



Year Book 



NET DISBURSEMENTS AND RECEIPTS 

ALL FUNDS 

Disbursements 

Gross disbursements and receipts $28,420,278 06 

Less transfers and advancements 5,237,107 70 

Net disbursements and receipts $23,183,170 36 

GENERAL FUND 

Gross disbursements and receipts $8,615,641 95 

Less transfers and advancements 43,023 34 

Net disbursements and receipts $8,572,618 61 

SUMMARY OF ALL FUNDS 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 

Gross receipts $26,841,371 60 

Less transfers and advancements 5,237.107 70 

Total available for fiscal year 

Gross disbursements $28,420,278 06 

Less transfers and advancements 5,237,107 70 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 

BALANCES BY FUNDS 

General Fund 

Educational institutions 

Vocational education 

State Debt Sinking Fund 

Common School Fund Principal 

Sale of state lands 

Unclaimed estates 

School revenue for tuition 

Fire marshal 

Hydrophobia Fund 

Highway Commission Fund 

Soldiers' War Memorial Fund 

Auto Theft Fund 

Balance September 30, 1921 



Receipts 
$26,841,371 60 
5,237,107 70 

$21,604,263 90 



$7,731,993 61 
2,843,008 76 

$4,888,984 85 



$4,568,397 37 

21,604,263 90 

$26,172,661 27 

23,183,170 36 

$2,989,490 91 



$168,603 94 


307,833 


71 


57,748 


71 


340,000 


00 


3 0,657 


99 


11,446 


47 


47.225 


09 


227,447 


45 


70,724 


07 


16.284 


85 


1,293,434 


18 


180,425 


20 


257,659 25 


$2,989,490 91 



GENERAL FUND DISBURSEMENTS AND RECEIPTS 

Executive Department — Disbursements 

Governor's salary $8,000 00 

Secretary 2,500 00 

Executive clerk 1,200 00 . 

Stenographer o 877 01 

Office expense 999 70 

Rent, light and heat 1,800 00 

Emergency Contingent Fund 86,811 68 

Emergency Compensation Fund 10,063 54 

Alteration, repairs and ventilation 10,756 08 

Committee on Mental Defectives 791 01 

Civil and military contingent 10,000 00 

Lieutenant-Governor 1.000 00 



$84,799 02 



Receipts 



5,878 97 
63 54 



$6,942 51 



Auditor of State 28 

Department of Adjutani>General— Disbursements Receipts 

Adjutant-General's salary $4,300 00 

Chief clerk 1,200 00 

Stenographer 900 00 

Additional stenographer 900 00 

Quartermaster general clerk 1,200 00 

Quartermaster general stenographer 900 00 

Riot Fund 6,396 50 

Indiana Militia 168,609 71 $85,144 91 



$184,406 21 $85,144 91 
Department of State — 

Secretary of State salary $6,500 00 

Deputy 3,000 00 

Assistant deputy 2,000 00 

Clerk and stenographer 1,200 00 

Office expense 947 17 

Distribution of public documents 250 00 

Distribution of court reports 123 86 

Foreign corporation and special recordings 609 58 $9 58 

Printing and distribution of acts 31,227 66 

Foreign corporation fees 80,626 96 

Domestic corporation fees 270,093 65 

Sale of court reports 6,872 00 

Notary fees 7,410 50 

Miscellaneous fees 15,346 49 

Securities clerk 972 59 

First assistant securities clerk 583 56 

Second assistant securities clerk 486 29 

Securities Commission license fees 7,157 04 

State Securities Fund 7,556 10 25,158 96 



$55,456 81 $412,675 18 

Bureau Public Printing and Stationery — 

Printing, binding and stationery $35,681 91 

Election Commission 85,559 85 

Supreme and Appellate Court reports 8,951 86 

Clerk's salary 2,488 41 

Assistant clerk 1,667 53 

Messenger 503 23 

Office expense 147 43 

$85,000 22 
Department of Auditor of State — 

Auditor of State's salary $7,500 00 

Deputy 3,500 00 

Audit clerk 3,000 00 

Settlement clerk 2,500 00 

Audit department stenographer 1,200 00 

Land clerk 1.800 00 

Land clerk traveling expense 176 38 

Land department fees $628 20 

Land department rentals 500 00 

Incorporation and miscellaneous fees 820 00 

♦Office expense 1,688 37 

Real estate dealers' license 370 00 

♦Insurance Contingent Fund 800 00 



$22,164 75 $2,318 20 



*Note — $990.66 of the $1,750.00 appropriated for office expense was disbursed by my 
predecessor prior to December 1, 1920, the date I assumed the office. The $800.00 
shown as disbursed from Insurance Contingent Fund was also vouchered and drawn 
by my predecessor prior to December 1, 1920. 



24 



Year Book 



Department of Treasurer of State — Disbursements 

Treasurer of State's salary $7,500 00 

Deputy 2,500 00 

Clerk and bookkeeper 1,500 00 

Office expense 364 17 

Transportation agent's fees 

$11,864 17 
Department of Attorney-General — 

Attorney-General's salary $7,500 00 

Assistant 3,600 00 

Deputy 2,600 00 

Second deputy 2,100 00 

Traveling deputy 1,600 00 

Stenographer and clerk 1,200 00 

Additional stenographer ." 900 00 

Traveling expense 1,137 93 

Law books ; 319 00 

Office expense 632 42 

Anti-trust, prohibition, escheated estates and other 

cases 15,587 14 

$37,176 49 
Clerk Supreme and Appellate Courts — 

Clerk's salary $5,000 00 

Deputy 2,400 00 

Assistant deputy 1,500 00 

Copy clerk 900 00 

Record clerk 1,500 00 

Clerk-stenographer 900 00 

Office expense 686 25 

Supreme court fees 

Appellate court fees 

' $12,886 25 
Reporter Supreme and Appellate Courts — 

Reporter's salary $5,000 00 

Assistant 2.400 00 

Second assistant 2,000 00 

Third assistant 1,000 00 

Office expense 108 75 

Contingent Fund clerk hire 300 00 

$10,808 75 
Supreme Court — 

Judges' salaries $30,000 00 

Clerk-stenographers 5,965 00 

Librarian 1,800 00 

Messenger and assistant librarian 1,200 00 

Sheriff 900 00 

Law library 2,998 85 

Office and chambers " 1,999 88 

$44,863 73 
Appellate Court — 

Judges' salaries $36,000 00 

Clerks-stenographers 7,200 00 

Messenger 1,200 00 

Expense 1,999 99 



Receipts 



$25 00 



$25 00 



$2,000 00 



$2,000 00 



$3,444 65 
8,383' 27 



$11,827 92 



$46,399 99 



Auditor of State 



25 



Superior, Circuit, Criminal and Probate Courts — Disbursements 

Superior Court judges' salaries .$69,240 28 

Circuit Court judges' salaries 259,773 35 

Criminal Court judges' salaries 2,800 00 

Probate Court judges' salaries 2,800 00 

Prosecuting attorneys' salaries 34,651 85 

Docket fees 

$369,265 48 
Department of Public Instruction — 

Superintendent $5,000 00 

Assistant 3,000 00 

Deputy 1,800 00 

Clerk 1,400 00 

Stenographer 1,050 00 

Office and traveling 2,494 41 

High school inspector 1,666 64 

High school inspector's expense 3,396 61 

Board of Education 12,292 00 

State Teachers' Training Board 9,110 83 

Elementary and high school inspector 3,597 93 

State Board of Attendance 1,504 02 

$46,312 44 
State Library — 

Librarian's salary $2,500 00 

Salaries Office Department 2,834 06 

Salaries Catalogue Department 6,658 00 

Salaries Reference Department 5,464 75 

History and Archives Department 4,519 55 

Cabinets 298 76 

Traveling expense 113 83 

Books and binding 6,984 49 

Office expense, supplies and distribution 1,546 63 

$30,920 07 

Board of Health- 
Secretary's salary $3,500 00 

Expense 29,390 28 

Child hygiene 14,983 87 

Foods and drugs 27,986 49 

Laboratory maintenance 11,954 07 

Division tuberculosis 9,236 82 

Weights and measures 9,601 52 

Baby book 4,403 52 

Venereal disease 32,417 85 

Cold storage license 

Water analysis fees 5,204 98 

Leper Fund 1,047 23 

$149,726 63 
Board of State Charities — 

Expense $15,499 49 

Agency Dependent Children 21,650 00 

License Fund 2,496 72 

~ Outdoor Relief 1,272 10 

Deportation 1,766 95 

Transportation 900 00 



Receipts 



$20,214 75 



$20,214 75 



$4,105 00 



$4,105 00 



$16 37 



$16 37 



$440 00 
6,600 00 



$7,040 00 



$900 00 



$43,585 26 



$900 00 



$515 36 



$515 36 



$100 00 



140 12 



26 . Year Book 

Board of Tax Commissioners — Disbursements Receipts 

Expense $56,044 01 

Secretary's salary 3,000 00 

Tax commissioners' salaries 12,850 00 

Tax commissioners' expense 1,682 18 

Inheritance tax $2,516 20 

$73,576 19 $2,516 20 

Board of Accounts — 

State examiner $4,000 00 

Deputy examiners 6,000 00 

Clerical assistants 7,194 48 

Office and traveling 1,668 09 

Examination fees 14,553 91 

Budget Department 1,827 19 

Board Certified Accountants 

$35,243 67 
Superintendent Public Buildings and Property — 

Superintendent's salary $2,500 00 

Assistants 36,040 00 

Repairs 20,083 56 

Illumination and power 9,000 00 

Water and ice 2,987 41 

Heating and fuel 10,988 55 

Receipts 

$81,599 52 $240 12 

Department of Conservation — 

Salaries and expense $68,369 07 $8,369 17 

Entomology License Fund 2,359 98 551 00 

Geology gas well fees 3,632 00 4,650 00 

Revolving Fund 21,327 23 25,775 42 

Miscellaneous receipts 354 03 

Fish and game 116,267 83 132,852 65 

Division of engineering 7,491 33 

$219,447 44 $172,552 27 

Employment Commission — 

Salaries and expense $21 48 

License fees $50 00 

$21 48 $50 00 

Industrial Board — 

Salaries and expenses $105,719 62 

Fees $16,624 60 

Free employment service 14,086 89 

Employment license fees 500 00 

Department of Women and Children 2,057 70 

$121,863 71 $17,124 60 

Public Service Commission — 

Salaries and expenses $163,650 63 $82,625 83 

Livestock Sanitary Board — 

Salaries and expenses $33,233 36 

Receipts $4,501 00 

Condemned tubercular cattle 49,969 86 

$83,203 22 $4,501 00 



Auditor of Statej 



27 



Board of Pardons — Disbursements Receipts 

Commissioners' salary and per diem $2,699 49 

Commissioners' expense 561 15 

Clerk 1.205 16 

Office expense 148 16 

Extra clerk and stenographer 105 00 

$4,718 96 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument — 

Maintenance $15,000 00 

Special 130 18 

Installing lamps and hangers 1,997 00 

Museum 444 85 

Receipts and earnings 13,371 40 

$17,572 03 $13,371 40 

Board Industrial Aid for Blind — 

Expense $71,314 83 

Equipping Women's Industrial Department 49 60 

Receipts $80,943 18 

$71,364 43 $80,943 18 

Legislative Reference Bureau — 

Expense $13,468 42 

Year Book 18,788 81 

$32,257 23 

Oil Inspection — 

Food and Drug Commissioner, salaries $3,800 00 

Food and Drug Commissioner, traveling expense 2 90 

Office expense 423 88 

Inspectors' salaries and expense 69,960 37 

Fees 

$74,187 15 

Nancy Hanks Lincoln Burial Ground Commission — * 

Expense $1,199 96 

Purchase of land 550 00 

$1,749 96 

State Soldiers' Home — 

Commandant $1,922 22 

Adjutant 1,233 33 

Chief post surgeon 1,250 00 

Assistant post surgeon 83 33 

Maintenance 223,771 68 

Repairs and painting 25,920 28 

Garage 211 64 

Hot water tank 112 50 

Receipts and earnings $908 01 

Government aid 21,750 00 

Clothing store room and equipment 6,184 20 

New hospital and kitchen, etc 4,344 78 

Power lawn mower 180 00 



$152,960 62 



$152,960 62 



$265,213 96 



$22,658 01 



28 



Year Book 



Soldiers' and Sailors* Orphans' Home — Disbursements 

Maintenance $124,367 80 

Repairs 7,999 56 

Library 299 98 

Musical instruments, supplies and gymnasium equip- 
ment 999 58 

Officers' salaries 4,096 82 

Insurance 399 89 

Agents' Fund 37 81 

Additional clothing for girls 1,000 00 

Receipts and earnings 

Construction ice and cold storage plant 1,099 80 

$140,301 24 
Tuberculosis Hospital — 

Maintenance $87,135 14 

Repairs 7,997 98 

. Dairy barn extension 1,621 56 

Turbine engine 2,250 00 

Children's building 2,157 88 

Superintendent's and nurses' cottage 500 00 

Kitchen equipment 229 00 

Fencing, tiling and clearing 891 69 

Topographical survey 200 00 

Milking machine 250 00 

Receipts from counties 

Receipts from patients 

Receipts and earnings 

Individual support 

$103,233 25 
Central Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $505,740 93 

Repairs 49,998 26 

Clothing 29,061 28 

Boiler room and steam lines 621 54 

Plastering 3,300 00 

Painting 13,805 43 

Plumbing and reconstructing department for women. 5»000 00 
Remodeling old building and erecting new building 

for men 15,154 46 

Iron fences 6,000 00 

Receipts and earnings 

Receipts from counties 

Individual support 

$628,581 90 
Eastern Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $239,593 60 

Repairs 19,931 01 

Clothing 8,983 28 

Cottage for women 20,379 07 

Medical equipment 7,295 25 

Mechanical equipment 7,123 39 

Colony extension and improvements 3,821 57 

Industrial building 14,399 83 

Rebuilding and re-equipment men's hospital 380 36 

Receipts and earnings 

Receipts from counties 

Individual support 



Receipts 



466 25 



$466 25 



$27,786 


77 


1,167 


06 


207 


46 


1,607 


16 


$30,768 


45 



$1,891 
17,970 
31,675 


01 
45 
99 


$51,537 


45 



$2,183 92 

8,675 20 

20,132 43 



$321,907 36 



$30,991 55 



Auditor of State 29 

Northern Hospital for Insane — Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $281,668 81 

Repairs 12.500 00 

Clothing 10,000 00 

Improvement to power plant 40,037 99 

Industrial building 8,767 14 

Repairs Assembly Hall 651 80 

Installation soft water supply system 3,010 12 

Receipts and earnings $1,375 46 

Receipts from counties 13,031 27 

Individual support 12,359 26 



$356,655 86 $26,765 99 

Southern Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $163,827 83 

Repairs 6,990 09 

Clothing 5,895 43 

Receipts and earnings 6,783 53 

Receipts from counties 5,721 46 

Individual support 3,309 21 



$176,713 35 $15,814 20 

Southeastern Hospital for Insane 

Maintenance $318,749 80 

Repairs 10,000 00 » 

Clothing 8,500 00 

Bridges, walks, roads, etc 4,883 58 

Industrial building, root house, etc 7,688 45 

Remodeling and repairing farm buildings 402 53 

Cold storage plant 7,002 45 

Greenhouse and equipment 27 58 

Farm colony 9,952 69 

Receipts and earnings $882 42 

Receipts from counties 7,953 50 

Individual support 17,415 1 



$367,207 08 $26,250 93 

School for Feeble-Minded Youth — 

Maintenance $269,569 25 

Repairs and painting 12,500 00 

Black Hawk Farm — fencing, tiling and equipment. . . 3,349 73 

Colony farm dairy bam extension 4,895 82 

Industrial siding and remodeling coal bin 277 44 

Ventilators and fire fighting apparatus 2,126 71 

Insurance 241 00 $241 00 

Black Hawk Farm repair fire loss 1,707 26 

Receipts and earnings 600 19 

Individual support 11,027 99 



$294,667 21 $11,869 18 

Village for Epileptics — 

Maintenance $129,684 89 

Repairs 8,000 00 

Groups for female patients 5,113 62 

Additional buildings and equipment 16,578 34 

Industrial building for males 791 20 

Farm buildings 2,000 00 

Farm improvements, tools and equipment and grad- 
ing roads 6,992 88 

Receipts and earnings $520 75 

Individual support 637 40 

Receipts from counties 5,962 95 



$169,160 93 $7,121 10 



30 Year Book 

Indiana Girls* School — Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance -. $120,566 50 

Repairs 7,994 13 

Receipts and earnings $128 25 

Receipts from counties 53,543 16 



$128,560 63 $53,671 4] 



Indiana Boys' School — 

Maintenance $144,999 95 

Repairs 12,498 78 

Live stock and farm equipment 3,955 49 

Remodeling building 3,295 08 

Dairy barn and silo 1,144 46 

Industrial Rotary Fund 

Receipts and earnings 

Receipts from counties 



Indiana Women's Prison — 

Maintenance 

Repairs 

Rotary Fund 

Repairing roof 

Receipts and earnings 



Indiana State Prison — 

Maintenance $201,166 84 

Repairs 9,994 52 

Discharged, parole, supervision and rewards 17,996 70 

Library and amusements 745 16 

Binder twine 607,752 17 $408,741 15 

Farm Fund 38,440 78 15,042 90 

Receipts and earnings 49,739 64 

Insurance 1,104 00 



276 50 


533 32 

86 88 
72,948 64 






$166,170 26 

$34,242 20 

2,949 38 

428 90 

1.960 47 


$73,568 84 

$9 00 

191 52 

3,837 39 


$39,580 95 


$4,037 91 



$876,096 17 $474,627 69 

Indiana Reformatory — 

Maintenance $243,209 98 

Repairs 20,159 09 

Trade schools 14,961 60 

School of letters 7,471 22 

Paroled and discharged prisoners 22,068 01 

Beds and bedding 3,965 14 

Reconstruction "A" cell house 17,220 80 

New dining room, kitchen and equipment 20,103 74 

Kitchen utensils and dining room 6,764 91 

Foundry equipment and repairs 13,409 16 

Relocation of reformatory 2,007 96 

Farm Fund 3,134 79 $ 2,239 00 

Manufacturing trade schools 229,262 39 181,686 92 

Receipts and earnings 749 80 

Sale of property 105,330 81 



$603,738 79 $290,006 03 



Auditor of State 81 

Indiana State Farm — Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $84,233 58 

Repairs 2,798 63 

Recapturing prisoners 869 13 

Material for three cottages 400 00 

Material for five kilns 260 10 

Completion of dormitory and hospital 1,608 38 

Radiation dryer and brick kiln 1,664 68 

Industry Fund 62,286 69 $70,102 14 

Transportation of prisoners 2,752 93 

Receipts and earnings 2,770 19 



I 



$154,121 19 $75,625 26 

Indiana School for Deaf — 

Maintenance $135,776 41 

Repairs 3,996 39 

Industries 5,925 92 

Library 285 20 

Painting 676 26 

Coal bunkers and coal hauling equipment 2,999 29 

Fencing, tools and agricultural equipment 348 30 

Receipts and earnings • 1,017 98 

Receipts from counties 171 55 



$150,007 77 $1,189 53 

Indiana School for Blind — 

Maintenance $63,882 97 

Repairs 2,493 49 

Books, musical instruments, etc 1,319 01 

Receipts and earnings $459 31 



$67,695 47 .$459 31 

Farm Colony for Feeble-Minded — 

Maintenance $40,696 53 

Material and equipment 34,239 15 

Building and equipment three colony houses 29,378 36 

Administration and service building 1,789 07 

Fencing and tiling farm 4,991 03 

Purchase of livestock 165 00 

Nursery stock 40 45 

Receipts and earnings $452 27 

Individual support 565 26 



$111,299 59 $1,017 53 

Purdue University — 

United States appropriation $50,000 00 $50,000 00 

Annual state appropriation 282,232 87 

Interest on bonds 17,000 00 

Appropriation, General Fund one cent levy. Acts 1921 . 114,111 59 



$463,844 46 $50,000 00 

Indiana University — 

Robert Long Hospital $65,000 00 

Waterman property rentals 2,776 85 $2,776 85 

Appropriation, General Fund one cent levy, acts 1921. 114,111 59 



$181,888 44 $2,776 85 

Indiana State Normal — 

Appropriation, General Fund one cent levy. Acts 1921. $57,055 80 



$57,055 80 



32 



Year Book 



Insurance Department — ' Disbursements 

Salaries and expense $39,557 09 

Expense and special fees 431 87 

Insurance taxes 666 03 

Insurance fees 

Steel filing cases 1,500 00 

$42,154 99 

Banking Department — 

Salaries and expense $54,610 93 

Expense and special fees 112 89 

Bank fees 

$54,723 82 

Board of Pharmacy — 

Pharmacy Fund $5,986 25 

Anti-Narcotic Fund 4,995 50 

$10,981 75 

Emergency and contingent $52,225 84 

Legislative expenses 103,844 04 

Legislative Visiting Committee 2,141 04 

Presidential electors 434 80 

Board of Medical Registration and Examination 5,213 19 

Board of Embalmers 2,061 84 

Board of Optometry 1,036 03 

Board of Registration and Examination of Nurses 2,978 49 

Board of Agriculture 138,495 66 

Horticultural Society 4,600 00 

Dairymen's Association 500 00 

Stock Breeders' Association 436 03 

State Corn Growers' Association 961 12 

Indiana Historical Commission 8,888 88 

Grand Army of The Republic 2,369 78 

Specific appropriations 7,871 97 

Lunacy Commission 63 00 

Escaped prisoners — Sheriff's expense 1,124 03 

Public Library Commission 17,500 00 

Memorial Art Commission 62 49 

Board of Finance 15,250 00 

Coal and Food Commission 30,977 22 

Child Welfare Commission 1,311 61 

Rhoda J. Chase, pension 1,060 00 

Indiana War Memorial 1,348 80 

Juvenile probation officer 2,343 40 

Battle Flag Commission 737 99 

Teachers' Retirement Fund 51,475 60 

State tax 

Tax refunded 122 88 

Depository interest • . 

Transportation tax 

Vessel tonnage tax 

General Fund miscellaneous receipts 

Investment interest receipts 

Transfer warrants 11,052 11 

Totals General Fund $8,615,641 95 



Receipts 

$360 85 

1,714 37 

1,141,162 27 

121,238 78 



$1,264,476 27 



$112 94 
83,192 75 



$83,305 69 
$9,141 00 

$9,141 00 



$7,090 00 

2,430 60 

1,227 00 

3,725 00 

631 18 



28 00 



82,579 16 



21,526 50 
998,200 80 

53,588 28 

39,974 39 

1,316 60 

3,682 69 

12,418 86 

2,814,817 70 

$7,731,993 61 



L 



Auditor of State 38 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION FUND 

Disbursements ReceiptK 

Tax from counties $2,814,817 70 

Transfer warrants to General Fund $2,814,817 70 

$2,814,817 70 $2,814,817 70 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION FUND 

Purdue University — 

Tax from counties $636,253 20 

Depository interest 7,656 25 

Payroll and miscellaneous $518,024 38 

Building Fund 17,645 00 

$535,669 38 $643,909 45 

Indiana University — 

Tax from counties $636,253 20 

Depository interest ' 1,355 76 

Payroll and miscellaneous $637,195 71 

$637,195 71 $637,608 96 

Indiana State Normal — 

Tax from counties $318,126 61 

Depository interest 457 89 

Payroll and miscellaneous $318,257 68 

$318,257 68 $318,584 50 

Totals Educational Institution Fund $1,491,122 77 $1,600,102 91 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Industrial, agricultural and domestic science $321,254 75 $37 33 

County agents 78,385 86 

Depository interest 1,487 12 848 21 

Government aid 113,906 53 

Tax from counties 113,805 88 

Investment account — Principal 76,380 78 261,754 00 

Investment account — Interest 14,014 62 

State aid, rehabilitation 11,052 11 

$477,508 51 $515,418 68 

STATE DEBT SINKING FUND 

Investment account $262,978 12 $348,460 02 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND 

Transfer from Hydrophobia Fund . $9,575 74 

Reclamation state land 348 60 

$9,924 34 

SALE OF STATE LANDS 

Sale of state land $173 50 $10,555 31 

UNCLAIMED ESTATES 

Unclaimed estates $1,394 78 $3,696 97 

3—19930 



34 Year Book 

SCHOOL REVENUE FOR TUITION 

Disbursements Receipts 

Tax from counties $3,267,944 67 

School Fund interest 616,021 53 

Unclaimed fees 2,869 60 

Manuscript fees 2,684 21 

Show license 7,396 00 

Apportionment $3,435,334 19 

Town and township deficiency 384,100 97 

$8,819,485 16 $3,896,916 01 

PERMANENT ENDOWMENT FUND INTEREST 

Interest from counties $45,871 72 

Professors' salaries Indiana University $45,871 72 

$45,871 72 $45,871 72 

ROAD FUND 

Automobile fees $2,403,703 16 

Depository interest 45,596 20 

Expense and refund $168,712 57 24,958 67 

Transfer warrant 2,305,545 46 

$2,474,258 03 $2,474,258 03 

FIRE MARSHAL 

Tax from companies $68,517 06 

Salaries and expense $46,999 67 140 46 

$46,999 67 $68,657 52 

HYDROPHOBIA 

Receipts from counties $20,955 95 

Salaries and expense $5,712 55 

Transfer warrants 11,534 29 

$17,246 84 $20,955 95 

STATE HIGHWAY FUND 

Salaries and expense $5,010,829 17 $77,674 10 

Construction 3,233,24199 57,276 54 

Tax from counties 2,213,184 30 

Federal aid 1,446,622 73 

Inheritance tax 652,597 10 

Transfer warrant 2,305,545 46 

$8,244,071 16 $6,752,900 23 

AUTO THEFT FUND 

Salaries and expense $108,758 15 

Fees 365,978 75 

Depository interest 443 65 

$108,758 15 $866,417 40 

WORLD WAR MEMORIAL FUND 

Tax from counties $179,776 30 

Depository interest 648 90 

Total $28,420,278 06 $26,841,371 60 



Auditor op State 



35 



STATE DEBT 

Purdue University — Non-negotiable 5 per cent bonds $340,000 00 

Five per cent stock certificates issued under Act 

1845 and 1846 $3,469 99 

Two and one-half per cent certificates issued under 

the same Act 2,145 13 5,615 12 

Total $345,615 12 

STATE TAXES OF INDIANA 



YEAR 


i 
1 


8« 


a 
-g.2 

-3.1 
P 

m 


1 
i 


I.I 
II 


i 
1 


1 

1 


1 


3 
1 


ll 

3 a 


jl 


1 


1900 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
12 
12 
12 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 


11 
11 
11 
11 
11 

11.6 
11.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
13.6 
5.2 
5.6 
7 


5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

3.9 

5.9 

6 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 


1.666 

1.666 

1.666 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.8 
2.8 
5 












29 666 


1901 












29 666 


1902 












29 666 


1903 












30.75 


1904 












30 75 


1905 












31 35 


1906 












31 35 


1907 . 












33 35 


1908 












33 35 


1909 












33 35 


1910 












31 85 


1911 












31.85 


1912 












31 85 


1913 . 


1 

1 

1 

1 

.5 
.5 
.2 
.2 
.5 










40 10 


1914 










40.10 


1915 . . .. 










40 10 


1916 










40.10 


1917 . 










35 10 


1918 










35.10 


1919 . 


3.9 
3.9 
3.3 








18 00 


1920 


.6 
.6 






20.00 


1921 


.4 


.2 


24.00 







36 



Year Book 



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^1 



OOOi«< 

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5,276,560 
2,709.170 
5,085,285 
3.280,930 
1,803,700 

6,463.490 
17,960,130 
7,669.715 
2.045,680 


: § 


'co 


5,899,475 

793.285 
10,521.115 
7,955.870 
3.575.510 
3.761.540 

2.542,370 
6,014,295 
622.145 
1.895.490 
1.331.660 


2,447,090 
1,420,275 
5,619,260 
4,580,535 

1,878,890 
3,851.720 
7,922,120 
2,226,250 
5,349,425 

695,535 
8,185,235 
1,585.100 


00 
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3.418,340 
1,738,780 
3,330,530 
2,361,215 
1,318,885 

4,176.310 

10,695,390 

4,898,960 

1,580,140 


i 

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i>^ 


3,967,335 

592,760 
5,833,275 
5,112,000 
2,309,035 
2.496,680 

1,903,750 
4,201.490 

474.640 
1,287,890 

927,330 


1,797,180 
1,033,730 
3,720,150 
2.873,720 

1,247,010 
2,664,755 
5,276,450 
1,666,205 
3,771,085 

522,150 
4,816,155 
1,116,430 


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1,858,220 
970,390 

1,754,755 
919,715 
484,815 

2,287,180 

7,264,740 

2,770,755 

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1,932,140 

200,525 
4,687,840 
2,843,870 
1,266.475 
1,264,860 

638.620 
1,812,805 
147,505 
607,600 
404.330 


649,910 

386,545 

1,899,110 

1,706.815 

631,880 
1,186,965 
2.645.670 

560.045 
1.578.340 

173.385 

3.369.080 

468.670 


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88 



Year Book 











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Auditor of State 



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coiooomo coc-1'Mcot^ 

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44 



Year Book 





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72,712 01 
17,403 64 
7,971 01 
42,860 43 
17,200 97 

1,884 04 
52,440 88 


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Gravel 

Road 

Construction 

Fund 


$31,137 58 

143,065 27 

68,042 84 

54,732 04 

12,258 03 

159,305 68 
106,919 21 

15,137 00 
137,422 84 

32,111 43 

372 08 
132,872 38 
97,534 19 
188,432 67 

294,397 51 
77,781 49 
96,666 62 
74,853 68 

69,860 18 
103,136 53 
112,444 18 
124,376 57 


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Gravel 
Road 
Repair 
Fund 


446 84 
779 46 
543 51 
461 98 
750 20 

198 93 
018 20 
927 51 
302 26 
803 91 

188 37 
407 15 
165 03 
436 59 

626 92 
249 39 
234 52 
661 46 

984 17 
052 12 
583 09 
188 14 


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CJ eS e« 03 cj <u^^ 



REPORT OF TREASURER OF STATE 



OFFICERS 

OR A J. DAVIE S, Treasurer of State. 

B. H. URBAHNS, Deputy Treasurer of State. 

AMY WOLFE, Stenographer-Bookkeeper. 

The office of Treasurer of State exists by virtue of the state- con- 
stitution. The Treasurer is elected for a term of two years. He may 
succeed himself, but is not eligible to serve more than four years in 
any period of six years. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER 

The statutes prescribe that, "The Treasurer shall receive of the 
several county treasurers, collectors of the public revenue, and of ail 
other officers and persons, all moneys whatsoever which are required by 
any act of the General Assembly to be paid into the treasury of the 
State. He shall keep, in books provided for that purpose, correct and 
separate accounts of all the moneys received by him by virtue of his 
office. He shall keep in like manner, correct accounts of all moneys 
paid by him out of the treasury." Payments may be made only upon 
proper warrants drawn by the Auditor of State. 

It is further required that, "All public funds collected by the State 
officer or board having an office in the State capitol building * * * 
shall be deposited (daily) with the Treasurer of State," who in turn 
shall deposit all such State funds, on the day following the collection 
thereof, in one or more banks or trust companies, which have previously 
been designated state depositories by the State Board of Finance. 

The Treasurer is ex-officio a member of the State Board of Finance, 
which board is composed of the Governor, Auditor and Treasurer. This 
board has supervision of all the fiscal affairs of the State. It selects 
state depositories with reference to the convenience of officers of State 
institutions using them. The 'State depositories pay monthly, into the 
State treasury, interest on daily balances of State funds at the rate of 
two per cent per annum on checking account, two and one-half per cent 
on semi-annual time deposits and three per cent upon annual time de- 
posits. Exception to this schedule of rates is made on deposits on the 
State sinking fund, for which the depositories pay four per cent on 
annual time deposits. 

The Treasurer of State is also ex-officio custodian of the funds and 
interest-bearing securities of the Indiana State Teachers' Retirement 
Fund. 



Treasurer of State 



49 



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53 



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54 



Year Book 



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Treasurer of State 55 

CONDITION OF INDIANA STATE TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 

For the year ending July 31, 1921 



RECEIPTS 



Balance — Cash in depositories July 31, 1920 $8,701 81 

Depository interest $343 77 

Interest on investments 13,416 56 

Securities matured 5,930 00 

Received from secretary 129,^28 28 — 148,918 61 

Total balance and receipts $157,620 42 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Secretary's warrants paid — 

Expenses $4,375 01 

Arrearages and assessments 133,768 20 — 138,143 21 

Total balance $19,477 21 



DEPOSITED AS FOLLOWS 

Commercial National Bank $19,477 21 

SECURITIES ACCOUNT 

Total securities held July 31, 1920 $268,162 80 

Total securities matured 5,930 00 

Total securities held July 31, 1921 $262,232 80 

RECAPITULATION OF RESOURCES 

July 31, 1921 

Cash in depositories $19,477 21 

Total securities held 262.232 80 

Total $281,710 01 



56 



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5 02 <n.(g.g_jf_j.;:^ 







REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
INSTRUCTION 



OFFICIAL STAFF 

BENJAMIN J. BURRIS, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
J. S, HUBBARD, Deputy. 
MAUDE M. WELLS, Clerk. 
MAE CONOVER, Stenographer. 

DIVISION OF TEACHER TRAINING 

OSCAR H. WILLIAMS, Supervisor. 
MARJORIE FORD, Assistant and Secretary. 
MABEL E. STANLEY, Stenographer and File Clerk. 

DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTION 

E. B. WETHEROW, Inspector. 
S. LEROY SCOLES, Assistant Inspector. 
MADGE OBERHOLTZER, Secretary. 
EVELYN G. KETT, Stenographer and Clerk. 

DIVISION OF LICENSING TEACHERS 

ROBT. K. DEVRICKS, Clerk. 
M. P. HELM, Assistant Clerk. 
ERMINA MOORE, Assistant Clerk. 
JUANDA KIRKMAN, Stenographer. 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

E. A. WREIDT, Director. 

H. G. McCOMB, Assistant Director. 

Z. M. SMITH, Agriculture. 

BERTHA LATTA, Household Arts. 

L. B. JOB, Rehabilitation. 

GLEN ANDERSON, Secretary. 

MARTHA MILLER, Stenographer. 

DIVISION OF SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 

BLANCHE MERRY, State Attendance Officer. 
JESSY DENNY, Secretary. 

STATE TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 

ESTES DUNCAN, Executive Secretary. 
ROXIE REESE, Clerk. 
E. K. SHUGERT, Bookkeeper. 
MARIE CONOVER, Stenographer. 



58 Year Book 

FOREWORD 

Indiana's school system is and ever must be a matter of pride to 
its citizens. By sanction of the Governor and state legislature, Indiana 
is planning for an exhaustive survey of all questions intimately affect- 
ing the work of the schools. This important movement will be com- 
paratively inexpensive since most of the work is to be done voluntarily 
and without expense to the state by the general education board, who 
have sent experts to gather the data and report their findings to the sur- 
vey commission. This commission will then make its report to the Gov- 
ernor for public consideration. By this means the citizens of Indiana 
may become informed fully and may be able to discuss intelligently the 
needs of our public school system. 

Among important school problems which are now being stressed 
by the Department of Public Instruction are: 

I. BETTER RURAL SCHOOLS 

The most backward feature of the school work in Indiana is the 
rural schools. There are about five thousand one-room schools in In- 
diana. Many of these buildings are insanitary, poorly heated, lighted 
and equipped, and destitute of nearly everything essential to a twentieth 
century public school plant. Rural schools present one of the state's 
leading school problems. 

II. BETTER TEACHERS AND TEACHING 

Much is being done towards improvement of the training of teach- 
ers for our schools. A shortage of teachers, which has been experienced 
for the past two years, has been relieved in a large measure. Further 
relief is promised by the fact that the normal schools are crowded with 
prospective teachers. 

III. SCHOOL SANITATION AND HEALTH 

Many cities in Indiana are attacking this problem in a manner con- 
sistent with its importance. The problem is also being taken up in 
some of the leading rural schools of the state. 

IV. COMPULSORY SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 

The business of the new attendance department, which works in 
conjunction with the State Board of Attendance, is to see that the chil- 
dren of the state are in school so that all may obtain that degree of 
training essential to efficient participation in civic life. 

RECENT SCHOOL LAWS 

The 1921 session of the legislature passed a number of important 
school laws: 

The retirement fund law was entirely worked over and is now state- 
wide in its operation. 

The state attendance law was changed in many vital points. Chil- 
dren now cannot quit school before they are through the eighth grade 
unless they reach the age of sixteen years. 



Department Public Instruction 59 

The state school levy was increased to seven cents and sets aside 
30 per cent, of the proceeds of this levy for distribution to the poor 
school corporations of the state. 

The work of elementary and high school inspection will be extended 
because of the law which permits the appointment of an assistant in- 
spector. 

The minimum salary for county superintendents was placed at 
$1,500 by an. act which provides several different kinds of qualifications 
for county superintendents. 

Text-book laws were amended so that dealers may charge a price 
which will give them 20 per cent, profit in place of twelve per cent. 

The state vocational levy was increased from one-fifth to one-half 
cent. 

A bill was passed providing for an appropriation of state money 
to match federal money for the rehabilitation of persons injured in 
industry. 

The Vesey life license law was amended so that it will be an easier 
matter for teachers in service to secure life certificates. 

Other acts were passed looking to the improvements of the schools of 
the state. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATION 



GENERAL OFFICE 

A. General supervision over all departmental divisions. 

1. Receipts and expenditures. 

2. Legal interpretation in doubtful cases. 

3. Appeal cases. 

B. Conferences with local school officials. 

C. Keeping minutes and other records of the State Board of Education. 

D. Keeping file of division circulars and reports. 

DIVISION functions AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

I. Division of Teacher Training: 

1. Inspection of teacher training institutions and supervision of 

courses therein: 

(a) For accrediting. 

(b) For classification by the State Teachers' Training 

Board. 

2. Listing approved institutions outside the state. 

3. Evaluating credentials and issuing life and provisional state 

certificates, and county superintendents' certificates. 

4. Classification for salary of holders of life and provisional cer- 

tificates. 

5. Promotion of teacher training through: 

(a) Conferences — local, district, state; 

(b) Monthly circulars mailed to teacher training institu- 

tions and school superintendents; and 

(c) Advisory and State Board committee work. 



60 Year Book 

II. Division of Elementary and High School Inspection: 

1. Inspection of elementary and high schools: 

(a) For purposes of accrediting. 

(b) For classification purposes. 

2. Administering state aid. 

3. School consolidation. 

4. High school credit. 

(a) General deficiency. 

(b) Dental college entrance. 

(c) Disabled ex-service men. 

5. Granting to teachers permits and exemptions on training. 

6. Bible study credit. 

7. Commissioned equivalency. 

III. Division of Licensing Teachers: 

1. Preparation and distribution of examination lists. 

2. Grading examination manuscripts. 

3. Issuing teachers' licenses. 

(a) General. 

(b) Exemption. 

(c) Life state on examination. 

4. Supervision of county permits to teach. 

5. Classification and wages based on licenses. 

6. Evaluating and filing certificates of training. 

7. Receiving and approving all certificates of professional train- 

ing for examination license. 

8. Issuing certificates of professional training for outside insti- 

tutions. 

IV. Division of Vocational Education: 

1. Promotion of vocational education by 

a. Studying conditions in the state with a view to recom- 

mending the establishment of vocational schools or 
classes. 

b. Preparing bulletins and circulars. 

c. Conferences and correspondence with teachers, school 

officials, and members of boards of education. 

d. Addresses to committees, clubs, and conventions of 

teachers and farmers. 

e. Assisting local authorities in the establishment of voca- 

tional schools or classes. 

2. Inspecting, supervising, and reimbursing vocational schools 

and teacher training courses, in (a) agriculture, (b) home 
economics, and (c) industry. 

3. Issuing licenses to vocational teachers. 

4. Granting reimbursement for tuition paid for transfer pupils 

enrolled in vocational schools. 

5. Providing vocational training courses for the vocational re- 

habilitation of persons having a physical disability which 
constitutes a vocational handicap. 



Department Public Instruction 61 

V. Division of Statistics and Accounting: 

1. Apportionment of school funds. 

2. Readjustment of congressional school funds (every ten years). 

3. Receiving and approving statistical and financial reports from 

county superintendents. 

4. Receiving and approving reports from county auditors. 

5. Compilation of statistical summaries of said reports. 

6. Warrant clerk for the department. 

7. Bookkeeping records of salaries and traveling expenses of the 

staff, and other office expenses. 

VI. Division of School Attendance: 

1. Approval of qualifications of local attendance officers. 

2. Supervision of work of local attendance officers. 

3. Receiving and approving work permits issued to children be- 

tween 14 and 16. 

4. Receiving and approving reports of local attendance officers. 



DIVISION OF TEACHER TRAINING 



OSCAR H. WILLIAMS, Supervisor. 

One of the outstanding features of teacher preparation during the 
academic year 1920-1921 was the marked increase in attendance in all 
grades of teacher training institutions. The fall enrollment in teach- 
ers' courses in the 35 accredited higher institutions in 1920 was 2,869 
as compared with 2,674 in 1919, an increase of 6.09 per cent; in 1921, 
autumn enrollments in teachers' courses were 4,363, an increase of 63.16 
per cent over 1919. The college and normal school graduates of 1920 
numbered 2,106 as against 1,457 in 1919, a 44.68 per cent increase. 

Perhaps it is in the spring and summer quarters that increases in 
teacher enrollments are most apparent. Thus in 1919, the summer regis- 
tration totaled 6,778; in 1920, it rose to 8,288; in 1921, it reached the 
unprecedented figure of 9,721. In two years summer school attendance — 
composed almost wholly of teachers — increased more than 43 per cent. 

During both spring and summer quarters the number of certificates 
of training of all grades issued on completed courses stood as follows: 
3,950 in 1919; 4,449 in 1920; 6,191 in 1921. In two years these legally 
authorized training certificates increased more than 56.73 per cent in 
numbers. 

The causes of the marked upward trend of enrollments in teach- 
ers' courses are not far to seek. Advancing standards of teacher prep- 
Iaration, higher levels of salaries paid to teachers, the acuteness of the 
business depression (bringing numbers of former teachers back to teach- 
ing), and the enhanced value placed upon college preparation in all 
lines of professional work, are exerting strong influences on teacher 
training. The fixing of the life and the provisional certificate as recog- 
nition of graduation from standard courses has also proved a potent 
influence in stimulating further preparation. As the highest types of 



62 Year Book 

teaching: certificates, these are coveted by teachers both because of the 
high professional standing which they reflect and of the exemption from 
license examinations which they carry. 

VESEY LAW AMENDMENTS 

The legislature of 1921 effected some noteworthy changes in the 
teacher^training law of 1919. Two of these changes are of outstanding 
importance. The first consisted of a change in the basis for awarding 
the life certificate to teachers in service, substituting for specific pro- 
fessional courses of training a successful teaching experience of forty- 
five months or more. The second withdrew from the training board 
the power of prescribing standards in accrediting higher educational 
institutions and vested this power in the General Assembly itself. 

STANDARDS BECOME FIXED 

A peculiar situation arose from the latter amendment. While 
withdrawing from the training board the authority to set standards, 
the legislature made the standards then in force the fi'xed legal stand- 
ards for normal schools and colleges. Among the standards then in 
force was a requirement for colleges of not less than $500,000 of pro- 
ductive endowment (or in lieu thereof a fixed annual income of at least 
$25,000). 

This requirement had been set by the training board in the sum- 
mer of 1920, but was not to become effective until September 1, 1921. 
A few of the standard colleges did not possess the requisite endowment 
or supporting income, but most of them had under way campaigns for 
increasing their financial assets. As the year 1921, with its accom- 
panying business depression, advanced, it became increasingly apparent 
that these colleges could not meet the legal standard of endowment 
assets. The training board had no power to lessen the requirement. 

Relief from the embarrassing situation was found in two ways. 

ENDOWMENT AND INCOME DEFINED • 

It was found that the training board could determine what it would 
accept as endowment or income assets. On April 15, 1921, the board 
established the following: 

I. PRINCIPLES RELATING TO ENDOWMENT AND INCOME 

1. No part of productive endowment should under any circum- 
stances be diverted to college building programs or current maintenance 
funds. 

2. Fixed annual income should constitute the basis of permanent 
support, except in cases of tax-supported institutions or those main- 
tained by religious brotherhoods; it is understood to be net annual in- 
come in every case. 

3. Student fees should be employed primarily for the purposes for 
which they are assessed. Any residue therefrom should be used to 
supplement fixed annual income, but may not be included in the mini- 
mum required. 



Department Public Instruction 63 

4, Building programs or expansion needs should respectively be 
financed by special "drives" or excess of income over normal demands, 
never from prescribed minimum of annual income. 

5. Financial reports of colleges should reveal (a) productive en- 
dowment assets, (b) total supporting income, with sources, (c) income 
derived from taxation or from contributed services where rendered with- 
out money compensation, if any. 

II. definitions applying to same 

1. Productive endowment should be understood to include the in- 
vested permanent assets, exclusive of grounds, buildings, equipment and 
appliances comprising the college plant, which yield a regular income 
for the support of the institution. 

It may include invested assets of any or all of the following kinds, 
so long as they yield a regularly paid net income: 

Bonds — ^municipal, state, federal, or corporation. 

Stocks, if dividend-paying. 

Estate notes or annuities, if yielding income in excess of annuity. 

Productive real estate, not including boarding halls and dormitories. 

Subscription notes, i:& interest-bearing from date. 

Mortgage loans. 

Cash, exclusive of current funds. 

Any other substantial securities yielding a net annual income. 

Pledged endowment, i. e., endowment pledged by national boards or 
foundations or by local organizations, should be included only if interest- 
or income-bearing. 

III. FIXED ANNUAL INCOME 

Exclusive of student fees, should comprehend income from fixed 
endowment, or from subsidiary sources in so far as guaranteed to be 
stable and permanent. 

1. Income derived from annual grants by church boards or con- 
ferences (conventions) should be included to any guaranteed minimum, 
if the guarantee is witnessed by a properly executed instrument; pro- 
vided, that income derived from sustenance notes may be accepted for a 
period of not to exceed three years from date thereof. 

2. Student fees should be understood to include all fees received 
from students for specific purposes, e. g., matriculation, tuition, gradu- 
ation, athletics, .gymnasium, laboratory, dormitory or boarding-hall, spe- 
cial examinations, and the like. All are excluded from recognized sources 
of supporting income. 

IV. FINANCIAL SUPPORT 

For tax-supported institutions shall include all income derived from 
state or federal taxation. Contributed services for colleges supported 
by religious organizations shall be understood to include all services 
by members thereof for which no money compensation is paid; pro- 
vided, that such services should be estimated at current rates for similar 
services in other standard colleges. 



64 Year Book 

Short term sustenance notes became the first expedient for tiding 
over the emergency. 

A second means of relief was found in the board's power to grant 
a reasonable extension beyond September 1, 1921, of time for the re- 
quirement as to endowment or income to become fully effective. This 
was done in the cases of two of the smaller colleges, the time being 
extended to May 1, 1922. One of the larger institutions — Valparaiso 
University — was found to be hopelessly deficient and by alternative 
rating it accepted the standing of a standard normal school. 

The official list of standard accredited normal schools and colleges 
is appended below. 

MINOR CHANGES IN THE LAW 

Amendments of lesser importance enacted by the legislature of 
1921 include provision for a three-year junior high school provisional 
and life certificate course, the making of any business or correspondence 
school amenable for misuse of the term "accredited," the transferring 
from the teacher training institutions to the training board of the au- 
thority to issue provisional certificates to graduates, and the extension 
of the provisional certificate to teachers in service with less than forty- 
five months' experience, who graduated prior to, as well as subsequent 
to May 15, 1919. These changes corrected many of the obvious admin- 
istrative deficiencies of the original law. 

No change was made in the requirements for the provisional cer- 
tificate, one-fifth the required credits consisting of professional work, 
including practice teaching and observation. 

THE TEACHER CENSUS OF 1921 

In the month of January the state department, with the aid of 
the school superintendents, conducted an extended census of the teach- 
ing population. For the first time detailed information respecting the 
teaching personnel, as regards sex, health and social status, age, gen- 
eral and professional preparation, length and character of teaching 
service, certification and classification, was obtained from 95 per cent 
of the teachers of the entire state. 

The data, obtained by means of an extended questionnaire, were 
tabulated by the superintendents and compiled and interpreted by the 
division of teacher training. 

In general, the report of the census shows that only a small por- 
tion — less than 5 per cent — of the teachers come from other states, and 
that nearly 20 per cent reside outside the school district or corporation 
in which they teach. Approximately 74 per cent are women, and 24 
per cent men; 78 per cent report they are married, 24 per cent single; 
60 per cent have dependents, and only 40 per cent are without depend- 
ents. The median age at beginning is 20 for men and 18 for women. 

Considering the entire personnel, 70 per cent are graduates of high 
schools (or equivalent), nearly 12 per cent are normal school gradu- 



Department of Public Instruction 65 

ates, and slightly more than 13 per cent are g-raduates of colleges. 
While far from the ideal, this showing as compared with the several 
states is rather above the average. 

More than 88 per cent of the teachers have obtained their pro- 
fessional preparation in summer schools. 

TRAINING IN SERVICE 

Aside from summer sessions, whose unprecedented growth was noted 
above, the development of plans for training teachers in service was a 
feature of prominence. Extension courses by correspondence, lecture- 
study, and adjunct classes, were carried by many hundreds of teachers 
under the direction of recognized institutions both within the state and 
outside. In August the training board approved a plan for conducting 
lecture-study courses by university extension in connection with the 
township institutes, credit being granted by the higher educational in- 
stitutions toward degrees and advanced teachers' certificates. These 
monthly meetings are thus to become a useful means for the further 
preparation of teachers. 

4 

TEACHER TRAINING CONFERENCES 

During the last quarter of 1920, a series of four district confer- 
ences on the teacher training work was held in as many centers. Facul- 
ties of teacher-training institutions, superintendents, and the state de- 
partment of education participated in the conferences. In June, a two- 
day state conference was held at the state university. These confer- 
ences have proved a valuable means of unifying and co-ordinating the 
work. 

NEEDS IN TEACHER TRAINING 

Among the more patent needs in the training of teachers in Indiana 
may be named the following: 

1. Larger state appropriations for normal schools. 

2. Specific state appropriation for practice and demonstration cen- 
ters. 

3. Prescribed minimum of one year of consecutive normal train- 
ing for beginning teachers. 

4. Minimum wage law fixing schedule of salaries for successive 
levels of preparation. 

5. Extension centers for normal schools for training teachers in 
service. 

6. Follow-up work by coll€;ges and normal schools with graduates 
in teaching service. 

7. System of certification providing lower grade provisional cer- 
tificates based on preparation and successful experience other than an 
examination. 

8. System of teacher certification established by U. S. Bureau of 
Education providing uniform standards and facilitating exchange of 
life certificates with other states. 

5—19930 



63 Year Book 

STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

One normal school and one college were advanced to standard classi- 
fication during the year. One standard college was reclassified as a 
standard normal school after September 1, 1921. 

The following is the official list of standard normal schools and 
colleges : 

STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
For pre33rib3d standards, see Educational Bulletin 43, "Teacher Training in Indiana", pp. 6-11. 

I . 

STANDARD COLLEGES 

Butler College Indiana University 

DePaaw University Manchester College 

Earlham College Notre Dame University 

Franklin College Oakland City College 

*Goshen College Purdue University 

Hanover College St. Mary's College 

Indiana Central College St. Mary-of-the-Woods College 

Wabash College 



STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOLS 

Central Normal College 

Indiana State Normal School, Main Division 

Indiana State Normal School, Eastern Division 

Teachers College of Indianapolis 

Tri-State College 

Valparaiso University 



INDIANA ACCREDITED NORMAL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
I 

ACCREDITED FOR FOUR-YEAR CURRICULA LEADING TO CERTIFICATES IN HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS 

Butler College, Indianapolis 

Central Normal College, Danville (In certain subjects) 

DePauw University, Greencastle 

Earlham College, Richmond 

Franklin College, Franklin 

Goshen College, Goshen 

Hanover College, Hanover 

Indiana Central College, Indianapolis 

Indiana State Normal School, Terre Haute and Muncie 

Indiana University, Bloomington 

Manchester College, North Manchester 

Notre Dame University, Notre Dame 

Oakland City College, Oakland City 

Piirdue University, Lafayette 

St. Mary-of-the-Woods College, St. Mary-of-the-Woods 

Valparaiso University, Valparaiso 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville 



*For a period of four years from September 1, 1920. 



Department of Public Instruction 67 



ACCREDITED FOR TWO-YEAR CURRICULA LEADING TO ELEMENTARY GRADE TBACHKR8 CERTIFICATES 



Central Normal College, Danville 

Evansville College, Evansville 

Fort Wayne Normal School, Fort Wayne 

Goshen College, Goshen 

Hanover College, Hanover 

Huntington College, Huntington 

Indiana Central College, Indianapolis 

Indianapolis Normal School, Indianapolis 

Indiana State Normal School, Terre Haute and Muncie 

Indiana University, Bloomington 

Manchester College, North Manchester 

Marion College, Marion 

Oakland City College, Oakland City 

St. Francis Normal School, Oldenburg 

St. Mary's College, Notre Dame 

Teachers College of Indianapolis 

Vincennes University, Vincennes 

Valparaiso University, Valparaiso 

Tri-State College, Angola * 

Winona Summer School, Winona Lake 



III 

ACCREDITED FOR TWO-YEAR CURRICULA IN SPECIAL SUBJECTS LEADING 
TO SPECIAL teachers' AND SUPERVISORS* CERTIFICATES 

Central Normal College, Danville Commercial subjects 

(Three- Year Course) 

DePauw University, Greencastle, School of Music Music 

Goshen College, Goshen Music 

Agriculture 
Home Economics 

Indiana University, Bloomington, School of Music Music 

Department of Physical Education for Men Physical Education 

Indiana Central College, Indianapolis Music 

John Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis, Normal Department Public School Art 

Indiana State Normal School, Terre Haute Agriculture 

Commercial Subjects 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Music 

Physical Educatio 

Indiana State Normal School, Eastern Division, Muncie Agriculture 

Music 

Home Economics 

Commercial Subjects 

Normal College, N. A. G. U., Indianapolis Physical Education 

Teachers College of Indianapolis Primary 

Kindergartening 
Home Economics 

Valparaiso University, Valparaiso Commercial Subjects 

Home Economics 

Music 

Physical Education 



Year Book 



STATISTICAL SURVEY 



SUMMER SESSION REGISTRATION 

Enrollments July 1. 
Class A Enrollments 

1919 1920 1921 

Standard Colleges 717 746 820 

Standard Normal Schools - 770 696 1063 

Normal Departments 24 101 91 

City and Special Normals 4 5 28 

Total 1515 1548 2002 



Per Cent Gain 

1921 over 1919 

14.36 

38.05 

279.10 

600.00 



32.14 



Class B Enrollments 

Standard Colleges 525 

Standard Normal Schools 

Normal Departments 

City Normal and Special Schools 

Total 1151 



1919 


1920 


1921 


Per Cent Gain 
1921 over 1919 


, 525 


437 
550 


525 
558 




292 


6.06 


30 


58 


121 


303.30 


2 


4 


221 


10,950.00 



1049 



1226 



6.51 



SUMMER SESSION REGISTRATION 
[Enrollments July 1. 

TOTAL REGISTRATION IN COURSES OF COLLEGIATE OR NORMAL SCHOOL GRADE 

I 



STANDARD COLLEGES 

Per Cent Gain 

1919 1920 1921 1921 over 1919 

Butler College 106 166 244 130.18 

DePauw University 88 56 153 73.85 

Franklin College 116 170 265 128.44 

Goshen College 100 112 162 52.00 

Hanover College 91 120 186 104 38 

Indiana Central College 47 51 70 48. 93 

Indiana University 1,308 1,479 1,652 20.82 

Manchester College 36 40 48 33.33 

Notre Dame University 329 463 620 85.16 

Oakland City College 230 229 349 51.73 

Purdue University r . . 40 171 

St. Mary's College 36 33 

St. Mary-of-the-Woods 645 662 607 

Valparaiso University 975 1,168 525 

Totals 4,091 4,792 5,075 24.29 



5.91 
i6.15 



STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOLS 

1919 

Central Normal College 720 

State Normal School (Terre Haute) 791 

State Normal School (Muncie) 536 

Teachers College (Indianapolis) 390 

Tri-State College 126 

Totals 2,563 



1920 


1921 


Per Cent Gain 
1921 over 1919 


750 


931 




26.52 


938 


1,451 




83.43 


902 


982 




83.20 


395 


533 




36.66 


201 


180 




42.85 



3,186 4,059 



36.85 



Department of Public Instruction 



69 



III 



NORMAL DEPARTMENTS IN NON-STANDARD COLLEGES 

1919 1920 

Ferdinand Academy , 

Oldenburg Academy 104 180 

Evansville College 80 

Huntington College 20 50 

Totals 124 310 



1921 


Per Cent Gain 
1921 over 1919 


72 




175 


68.26 


228 




54 


185.00 



529 



268.70 



IV 



CITY NORMAL AND SPECL4L SCHOOLS 
1919 



Fort Wayne Normal 

NormalCoUege, N. A. G. U. 

Grand Totals 



1920 
20 



1921 
80 
50 



6,778 8,288 9,793 



Per Cent Gain 
1921 over 1919 



44.48 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF LIFE AND PROVISIONAL CER- 
TIFICATES ISSUED 

(Fiscal Years 1919, 1920 and 1921, ending September 30, respectively.) 
TRAINING INSTITUTIONS INSIDE THE STATE 

STANDARD COLLEGES 



To Graduates of 



Butler College 

DePauw University 

Earlham College 

Franklin College 

Goshen College 

Hanover College 

Indiana Central College 

Indiana University 

Manchester College 

Notre Dame University 

Oakland City College 

Purdue University 

St. Mary-of-the- Woods College 

Valparaiso University 

Wabash College 

Total 



Provisional Certificates 



1919 



1920 



140 



1921 



161 



Life State Certificates 



1919 



1920 



119 



1921 



7 
7 

178 
1 
2 
4 

16 


14 
5 



312 



STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOLS 



To Graduates of 


Provisional Certificates 


Life State Certificates 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1919 


1920 1 1921 


Central Normal College 



10 


1 



11 

45 
6 

50 
3 


18 
87 
17 
79 
9 


1 
16 


28 
7 


5 
31 

3 

25 
13 


12 




69 


Indiana State Normal, Eastern Division. 

Teachers College of Indianapolis 

Tri-State College 


1 

25 

6 






Total 


11 


115 


210 


52 


77 


113 



70 



Year Book 



NORMAL DEPARTMENTS 



To Graduates of 


Provisional Certificates 


Life State Certificates 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1919 1 1920 


1921 


Art Institute 
















13 
4 



3 


3 



1 
36 
10 
2 


3 







3 



2 

3 






6 





1 








Convent of Sisters of St. Francis 

Evansville College 


9 
3 


Huntington College 

Moores Hill . . 



1 




4 


Normal College, N. A. G. U 

Marion Normal College 

South Bend Training School . . 




4 







Winona Normal College 


1 






Total 





23 


52 


8 


7 


22 



CITY TRAINING SCHOOLS 



To Graduates of 


Provisional Certificates 


Life State Certificates 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1919 


1920 


1921 


Evansville Normal 








10 



14 
45 
19 


1 
2 
1 


10 

30 

1 


1 




8 


Indianapolis Normal 


3 


Total 





10 


78 


4 


41 


12 



TRAINING INSTIIUTIONS OUTSIDE THE STAII 



To Graduates of 


Provisional Certificates 


Life State Certificates 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1919 


1920 


1921 




4 
2 



6 



12 


5 








25 


8 
1 


1 
6 

6 
94 


5 
2 
2 


3 


20 


18 

2 ' 

1 

2 

4 
20 


18 


26 


University of Illinois 


11 




11 




4 


Columbia University 


6 


Michigan State Normal (Ypsilanti) 

Western Michigan State Normal 
(Kalamazoo) 


11 

4 
151 






Total 


24 


30 


110 


32 


65 


224 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



RECEIPTS 

From fees — 

For Life State Certificates $3,410 00 

For Provisional Certificates 719 00 

$4,129 00 

From Interest on Deposits 14 15 

From General Appropriation 4 , 799 68 

Total Receipts $8,942 83 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Printing, Office Supplies, Stationery, Telephone and Telegrams $1 , 702 51 

Postage ; 400 00 

Traveling Expenses 671 29 

State Conference Speakers 283 20 

$3,057 00 



Department of Public Instruction 71 



SALARIES 

Oscar H. Williams $3,WJ0 00 

Marjorie E. Ford 1,400 00 

Mabel C. Stanley 500 00 

Special — 

Roy B. Julian 300 00 

Jessy C. Denny 45 83 

Laura M. Reyer ; 40 00 

5,885 83 

Total Disbarsements $8,942 83 



I 



DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTION 

E. B. WETHEROW, State School Inspector. 

In the last General Assembly a law was passed which provides for 
the appointment of an* elementary and high school inspector and gives 
the State Board of Education authority to appoint one assistant. The 
high school inspection law which was passed in 1913 was repealed. The 
new law provides for inspection and classification of all public, ele- 
mentary and high schools in Indiana. All town, city and county superin- 
tendents are made co-operating agents of the inspectors. 

The elementary and high school inspector began his work on June 
1st and later in the same month S. LeRoy Scoles was appointed his 
assistant. 

SOME DUTIES OF INSPECTORS 

Some of the duties of the school inspectors are as follows: 

1. Inspection of high schools to ascertain needs in buildings, equip- 
ment and teaching. 

2. Reports to the State Board of Education for classification of 
high schools. 

3. Issuance of temporary and permanent permits on training of 
teachers, as approved by the State Board of Education. 

4. Reports to township trustees and to school boards which make 
recommendations for improvement. 

5. Inspection of elementary schools on request. 

6. Inspection of private and parochial schools on request. 

7. Editing of the High School Directory and such other bulletins 
as are needed for the division of inspection. 

8. Recommendations for issuance of permits to establish Bible 
Study for credit. 

9. Supervision of State examinations for high school credit. 

CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH SCHOOLS 

During the school year the commissioned high schools in Indiana 
were classified by the State Board of Education into three classes: 

First Class — All high schools which have a school term of nine 
months and hold commissions on continuous basis. 



72 Year Book 

Second Class — All high schools which have a school term of eight 
months and hold commissions on continuous basis. 

Third Class — All high schools whose commissions are issued for but 
one year and expire at the end of the school year. 

Other high schools which are not commissioned are accredited for 
one, two, three or four years of work, or are known as unclassified high 
schools. 

CLASSIFICATION OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

A plan for the classification of all elementary schools on a basi-^ 
of 100 points was approved by the State Board of Education June 21, 
1921. This plan provides that schools which score 90 points or higher 
shall be known as schools of the first class; that all schools which score 
above 80 points and below 90 shall be known as schools of the second 
class; and that all schools which score below 80 points shall be known 
as schools of the third class. For the school year of 1921-1922 schools 
shall be classified only on request. Beginning in September, 1922, all 
elementary schools in Indiana will be classified. 

The main divisions on the score card and the points for each are 
as follows: 

Points 

I. The school ground 6 

II. The school building 20 

III. Heating and ventilation 7 

IV. Equipment 21 

V. The school term 8 

VI. The teacher and the school 25 

VII. Supervision 7 

VIII. Janitor service 6 

Total .100 

These divisions are sub-divided so that any school official may score 
a school intelligently. 

THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

During the year there was a noticeable growth in the junior and 
six-year high schools. One hundred and sixty-five were reported as 
having such organization, but only thirty-eight, as listed below, were 
approved by the State Board of Education: 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 

Anderson Brazil 

Bedford Elkhart Roosevelt 

SIX-YEAR HIGH SCHOOLS 

Bourbon Forest 

Bowers Howard Township 

Charlottesville Lancaster Center 

Clarkesburg Liberty Township 

Clear Creek Center Linden 

Dallas Township Markle 

Darlington Mount Comfort 






Department of Public Instruction 73 

New London Salamonie Township 

l4'ew Palestine Sandusky 

Petroleum Seymour 

Plainfield Straughn 

Polk Township Union Center 

Posey Township Union Township 

Raccoon Township Warren Township 

Roanoke Waveland 

Rock Creek Center Wayne Township 

Russiaville Winamac 

The outlines' of work for the six-year high school and for the junior 
high school have been revised to conform to a program of forty-minute 
recitations instead of thirty-minute recitations. This revision makes it 
possible to make the same time schedule for grades seven and eight 
as for the high school and by so doing, to allow teachers to work m 
both the seventh and eighth grades and in the high school. 

4 

SOME APPARENT NEEDS 

1. A law which will provide for State aid in erection of school 
buildings in several of the counties in southern Indiana. 

2. A number of modern school buildings and additions to old ones 
in many counties. 

3. Better supervision of schools by principals, and by visiting 
teachers for the one-room schools. 

4. Consolidation of schools in many townships and consolidation 
of towns and townships wherever possible. 

5. Many additional vocational teachers in agriculture and home 
economics. 

6. A greater number of properly trained teachers for the special 
subjects. 

. ' FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

SALARIES 

E. B. Wetherow. inspector $2,666 64 

S. LeRoy Scoles, assistant (for three months) 687 50 

Madge Oberholtzer, secretary 1,200 00 

Blanche Richardson, clerk and stenographer (for nine months) ... 900 00 

Gladys Kett, clerk and stenographer (for three months) 300 00 

Jessy Denny, stenographer (for two weeks) 50 00 

— $5,804 14 

TRAVELING EXPENSES 

For E. B. Wetherow $957 52 • 

For S. LeRoy Scoles 346 98 

1.304 50 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Postage $440 00 

Printing of high school directory 1,169 51 

Other pfinting and office supplies 1,569 54 

Telephone and telegrams 100 95 

Office furniture and typewriters 435 77 

3,715 77 

Total $10,824 41 



74 



Year Book 



TABLE AND SUMMARIES 
Total Existing High Schools 





1917-1918 


1918-1919 


1919-1920 


1920-1921 




583 
118 
62 

43 
97 


597 
121 

84 

43 

28 


620 

77 
54 

*26 
60 


631 




68 




51 


Total number private schools with commissioned high school 

equivalency 

Total number of high schools with no standing 


*30 
40 


Grand total number of hif h schools 


903 


873 


837 


820 







INCREASE IN HIGH SCHOOLS 
(Eight-year period) 











Total Number 






Total 


Total 


Total 


High School 


Total 


School Year 


School 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 


Teachers, 


Nimiber 




Enumeration 


in All Schools 


in High Schools 


Principals and 
Superintendents 


High Schools 


1913-1914 


766,383 


548,497 


59,822 


3,307 


628 


1914-1915 


768,622 


552,927 


64,404 


3,696 


719 


1915-1916 


774,342 


564,252 


69,651 


3,926 


809 


1916-1917 


774,642 


567,952 


72,383 


4,242 


847 


1917-1918 


776,868 


564,162 


77,695 


3,819 


903 


1918-1919 


778,786 


557,376 


74,891 


3,780 


873 


1919-1920 


784,430 


566,089 


78,849 


4,732 


837 


1920-1921 


797,537 


578,849 


86,880 


5,123 


820 



ENROLLMENT IN HIGH SCHOOLS 
(Four-year period) 

Commissioned High Schools 1917-18 

Boys 30,829 

Girls : 36,347 

Total 67,176 

Certified High Schools — 

Boys 1 , 835 

Girls 1,932 

Total 3,767 

Accredited and Unclassified High Schools — 

Boys 983 

Girls 1,063 

Total 2,046 

Grand Total 72,989 



1918-19 
32,304 
38,209 



74,891 



1919-20 
34,995 
39,952 



1920-21 
38,762 
44,310 



70,513 


74,947 


83,072 


1,249 
1,523 


1,257 
1,376 

2,633 


1,260 
1,368 


2,772 


2,628 


715 
891 


567 
702 


570 
610 


1,606 


1,269 


1,180 



• GRADUATES OF HIGH SCHOOLS 

Commissioned High Schools — 1917-18 

Boys 4, 676 

Girls 6, 126 

Total 10,802 

Certified High Schools — 

Boys 292 

Girls 306 

Total 598 

Grand total 11,400 

*Includes private and parochial schools. 



1918-19 
4,639 
6,495 

11,134 


1919-20 
4,991 
6,467 

11,458 


1920-21 
5,228 
6,627 

11,855 


217 
243 


183 
236 


209 
200 


460 


419 


409 



11,594 



11,877 



12,264 



Department of Public Instruction 



75 



HIGH SCHOOLS — COST OF MAINTENANCE 

Commissioned High Schools— 1917-18 1918-19 

Total current cost for year $4 , 285 , 945 05 f 4 , 89 1 , 24 1 62 

Total cost per pupil 58 90 69 36 

Certified High Schools — 

Total current cost for year 248,261 07 267,591 05 

Average cost per pupil 74 30 96 53 

Accredited and Unclassified High Schools — 

Total current cost for year 148,334 61 137,551 42 

Average cost per pupil 73 02 85 64 

Grand total for year $4 , 682 , 510 73 $5 , 296 , 384 09 

Grand average cost per pupil 60 26 70 72 



1919-20 
$6,236,072 99 
82 39 


1920-21 
$9,460,999 18 
113 88 


278,504 43 
110 34 


315,963 59 
120 23 


137,204 98 
105 70 


140,740 91 
110 80 


16,651,782 40 
83 66 


$9,917,703 68 
114 15 



STATE SCHOOL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 

1917-18 1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 

Schools having received first commission 20 14 26 11 

Schools having commission reissued 102 72 88 86 

Schools having commission renewed 3 6 9 * 

Schools having commission continued 93 79 63 72 

Schools having commission revoked 10 6 5 * 

Total schools inspected for commissioned standing 228 177 191 169 

Schools having received first certificate 11 5 7 1 

Schools having certificate reissued 20 19 11 8 

Schools having certificate renewed. 14 1 

Schools having certificate continued 10 9 6 

Schools having certificate revoked 6 1 1 

Total schools inspected for certified standing 48 38 18 17 

Schools accredited for one year 1 1 

Schools accredited for two years 8 12 7 7 

Schools accredited for three years 11 12 9 16 

Schools accredited for four years 3 2 

Total schools inspected for accreditment 20 27 16 26 

Total schools given no standing 16 12 5 3 

Total schools inspected 312 254 230 215 

*The commissions of seven high schools were revoked because of delinquent annual reports, but were 
renewed later. 



DIVISION OF LICENSING TEACHERS 

The following kinds of licenses may be used in teaching in the public 
schools of the State: 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Twelve, twenty-four and thirty-six months common school license. 

Primary license for grades 1-4. 

Exemption common school license. 

Elementary provisional certificate. 

Elementary life State certificate. 

State Normal diploma. 

Professional (eight year) license. 

Life State license (by examination). 



76 Year Book 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Twelve, twenty-four and thirty-six months high school license. 
(Issued in the subjects that are to be taught.) 

Exemption high school license. (Exempt in subjects found on 
license.) 

High school provisional certificate. 

High school life State certificate. 

State Normal diploma. 

Professional (eight-year) license. 

Life State license by examination. 

The following licenses are not mentioned above: Explanation fol- 
lowing each will define its use. 

PROVISIONAL AND LIFE STATE SPECIAL CERTIFICATES 

Provisional and life state special certificates are issued in Kinder- 
garten, Kindergarten Primary, Primary and Special subjects such as 
Music, Art, Domestic Science, etc. The -certificates will specify whether 
for elementary or high schools. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LICENSE 

Subjects included in this license qualify the teacher for teaching the 
subjects mentioned therein in the 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grades, and the 
corresponding subjects in the 8th grades. The common school subjects 
mentioned in this license qualify for teaching such subjects in junior 
high schools. 

SUPERVISORS' LICENSES 

Supervisors' licenses qualify for teaching or supervising the subject 
upon which the licenses are granted in both the elementary and high 
schools. Exemptions are issued on 36 months supervisors' licenses. 

SPECIAL COMMON SCHOOL LICENSES 

Special licenses are issued in Music, Domestic Science and Agricul- 
ture, which qualify the teachers for teaching these special subjects in 
the elementary schools. These subjects may be included on the 12, 24 
and 36 months common school licenses or may be taken on a separate 
examination. 

MANUSCRIPTS RECEIVED 

October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921 

Common school — Plan I 8,775 

Common chool — Plan I, cond 2,906 

Common school — Plan II, Div. I 76 

Common school— Plan II, Div. II 24 

High school / 7,425 

Supervisor 2,776 

High school credit (II cond.) , . . , , 821 

Total number manuscripts received 22,803 



Department of Public Instruction 77 

licenses written during the year 1921 

COMMON SCHOOL 

12 months 2,528 

24 months 1,045 

36 months 136 

Total 3,709 

PRIMARY 

12, 24 and 36 months 802 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Junior high school 1,466 

Senior high school 3,976 

Total 5,442 

4 

SUPERVISOR 
12, 24 and 36 months 2,005 

Grand total . . : , . . 11,958 



L 



78 



Year Book 



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80 Year Book 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 



CLAIMS FOR REIMBURSEMENT CANNOT BE PAID 

Although Table 1, below, shows a balance of $27,584.48 on hand 
at the end of the fiscal year, the total resources for the year, $424,232.99, 
were not sufficient to meet all claims for reimbursement. 

TABLE 1. RESOURCES AND EXPENDITURES 
October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921 

RESOURCES 

(1) Balance October 1, 1920 $216,623 67 

(a) State funds, cash^ $8,282 59 

(b) Federal funds, cash 10,917 04 

(c) State funds, invested 197,424 04 

(2) Federal funds • • • 91,802 31 

(3) State taxes -. ,• 115,807 01 

Total $424,232 90 

EXPENDITURES 

(1) state office $18,533 60 

(a) Salaries $14,605 89 

(b) Travel 2,113 65 

(c) Expense 1,814 06 

(2) Reimbursement, teacher-training 22,655 54 

(a) State funds . 246 98 

(b) Federal funds 22.408 56 

(3) County agents^ 78,385 86 

(4) Reimbursement, transfer tuition 37,376 65 

(a) Agriculture $26,535 05 

(b) Home economics 8,093 72 

(c) Industry . 2,536 86 

(5) Reimbursement, vocational courses 239,696 86 

(a) Agriculture $65,949 86 

(b) Home economics 48,242 96 

(c) Industry 125,504 04 

Total $396,648 51 

Balance October 1, 1921 , 27,584 48 

$424,232 99 

The total claims for reimbursement for teacher-training, tuition and 
vocational courses amounted to $385,104.11. This amount, together with 
the expenditures for county agents and State office, totalled $482,023.57, 
which was larger by $57,790.58 than the total resources available. 

In addition to eliminating this deficit, it was necessary to set aside 
the sum of $27,584.48 for county agents and for State office expendi- 
tures up to January 1, 1922, when the next State tax receipts are 
available. To accomplish these results it was decided to prorate the 
claims for reimbursement for vocational courses and for teacher-training, 

1 The Auditor's balance here is $8,921.50. The difference, $638.91, is an interest 
item paid to the Federal government after October 1, which should have been paid 
before October 1. 

2 Although the expenditures for county agents are administered by Purdue Univer- 
sity, the amount is included here since it is taken from the tax levy fixed in the law 
on vocational education. 



Department of Public Instruction 81 

about 75 per cent of these claims being paid. The amounts in Table 1 
are the amounts actually paid. 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

As shown in Table 19, below, the expenditures have increased rapidly 
since 1912-13. For 1920-21 the increase is 25 per cent over 1919-20. 

The legislature of 1913 levied a tax of one cent for vocational 
education with the understanding that during the first few years the 
proceeds of this tax would be larger than needed and that the surplus 
thus accumulated would be applied in later years when the needs should 
exceed the annual income. 

In 1917, in view of the accumulation of this surplus, the legislature 
reduced the tax levy to one-half cent and in 1919 the tax commissioners, 
in a general readjustment of tax levies to correspond to the increased 
valuation, reduced the levy to one-fifth cent. Meantime, the work in- 
creased and in 1918-19 the expenditures for the first time exceeded the 
annual income from State and Federal funds combined, since which time 
it has been necessary to draw increasingly upon the accumulated sur- 
plus, until it was exhausted in the year 1920-21. 

Anticipating the deficit occasioned by the increase in vocational 
education and the decrease in the proceeds of the tax levy, an appeal 
was made to the last legislature to restore the tax levy to its original 
amount, namely, one cent. The legislature, however, saw fit to fix the 
levy at one-half cent. 

HALF CENT LEVY IS NOT SUFFICIENT 

Although the levy of one-half cent is a generous increase over the 
former levy, it is still not sufficient to meet the legal claims for reim- 
bursement for vocational schools already in operation. For the last 
three years the income from the tax levy has each year not been suffi- 
cient to meet the annual expenditures, even when the levy has been 
supplemented by Federal funds. During these three years the surplus 
accumulated from former years, has been drawn upon to meet expendi- 
tures, until in 1920-21 the entire surplus was exhausted. For 1921-22 
and 1922-23 there will be no surplus to draw upon and the resources 
will therefore be limited to the Federal funds and the receipts from 
the State levy of one-half cent. These resources will each year be less 
than the actual expenditures in 1920-21 when the surplus was available 
to supplement the insufficient receipts from the State and Federal funds. 

EXPENDITURES MUST BE LARGELY REDUCED 

Since the available funds for 1921-22 and 1922-23 are largely re- 
duced, the expenditures must also be largely reduced. The available 
funds. State and Federal, are (partly estimated) $327,801.10 for 1921-22 
and $383,665.62 for 1922-23. The expenditures (estimated) for 1921-22 
are $439,548.83, which amount includes reimbursement for no schools 
other than l^hose reimbursed for 1920-21. These figures show a deficit of 
$111,747.73 for 1921-22. 

To eliminate this deficit, notice has been given to local school au- 

6—19930 



82 Year Book 

thorities that no new schools can be aided during 1921-22 and that 
the amount to be granted to schools already on the list would be about 
50 per cent of the amount received in 1920-21. In other words, the reim- 
bursement for 1921-22 for schools already on the list, will be about one- 
fourth of the salaries of vocational teachers whereas before 1920-21 it 
was two-thirds of the salaries. 

The estimated deficit for 1922-23 is $40,997.33 which is less than 
the deficit for the preceding year, 1921-22. This decrease in the deficit 
is due mainly to the fact that for 1921-22 the tax receipts are. still on 
the one-fifth cent basis for the money received in December, 1921, and 
do not advance to the one-half cent basis until June, 1922. For 1922-23 
the tax receipts are on the one-half cent basis for the entire year. 

The larger receipts for 1922-23, however, will still leave a deficit 
of $40,997.33 for that year, even if no schools are reimbursed other than 
those on the list in 1920-21. In other words, as long as the levy remains 
at one-half cent there will be a deficit, even if no new schools are reim- 
bursed, and the schools already on the list can not receive the minimum 
reimbursement fixed in the law. 

SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS ABANDONED AND EXPANSION ELIMINATED 

As a consequence of the reduced reimbursement for 1921-22, seven- 
teen schools in operation last year have already (November, 1921) been 
abandoned, nine in agriculture and eight in home economics. These 
seventeen schools were located mainly in small rural communities. In 
addition, about fifty school corporations were making definite plans 
to establish vocational schools for the first time in 1921-22 but abandoned 
their plans on learning that no reimbursement whatever could be granted 
for new schools. 

STRONG DEMAND FOR VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

The fifty school corporations just referred to were not en- 
couraged by the State oflfice to make plans for new schools this year. 
Their plans were entirely the result of their own initiative. This fact 
is evidence of the need and the strong demand for vocational schools. 
On the other hand, the fact that these fifty school corporations 
abandoned their plans on learning that no reimbursement could be 
secured is evidence that very little increase in the number of vocational 
schools in the State can be expected in the near future unless State aid 
is available for a portion of the cost of such schools. 

Every year during the last four years the demand for new agri- 
culture schools has been greater than the number of teachers available 
for such schools. About twenty new agriculture schools have been added 
each year. Many more could have been added if more teachers had 
been available. This year, 1921-22, agriculture teachers are being sent 
to other states, partly because insufficient State funds make it impos- 
sible to establish new agriculture schools in Indiana. 

HOW MUCH IS LEFT UNDONE 

Indiana has every reason to be proud of its progress thus far in 
vocational education. The percentages in Table 19, below, indicate the 



Department of Public Instruction 



83 



rapid expansion which has taken place since 1913 when the State law 
was enacted. 

Are we justified, however, in concluding that we have completed the 
program involved in a State system of vocational education? Are we 
using all the State money that should be devoted to vocational educa- 
tion? What portion of the State has now been reached by vocational 
schools ? 

Last year, 1920-21, of the 1,256 school corporations in the State, 
there were 341 school corporations, about one-fourth of the total, which 
had over 23,000 pupils enrolled in vocational schools. These 341 school 
corporations included ninety-eight which conducted vocational schools 
and 243 which did not conduct vocational schools but which transferred 
some of their pupils to vocational schools in neighboring school cor- 
porations. 

About three-fourths of the State, then, has not yet been reached by 
vocational schools. More than 70,000 of the youth of the State do not 
now have the opportunity for vocational training which they should have 
if the intent of the law is to be carried out. Stated in other terms, 
there were fifty-one counties which had no agriculture school last year; 
fifty-seven counties which had no home economics school; and sixty- 
nine counties with no industrial school. 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS, 1920-21 

Table 2, below, shows the location of the ninety-eight school cor- 
porations conducting vocational schools in 1920-21, in one or more of 
the fields of agriculture, home economics, and industry. It also shows 
for each school corporation the number of vocational pupils and teachers, 
the total amount expended for salaries of vocational teachers, and the 
portion of this amount which was paid from Federal funds, from State 
funds, and from local funds. Table 3 classifies the totals of Table 2 
in terms of agriculture, home economics, and industry. 

TABLE:2. VOCATIONAL^SCHOOLS, 1920-21 



Location 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 
Teachers 


Reim- 
bursement 


Local 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total cost 
for salaries 


Anderson 


1,377 
25 
14 
77 
54 
12 

194 
46 
35 
36 
11 
13 
26 
62 

158 
12 
43 

156 

9 

21 

25 

524 

377 
69 


45 
1 

1 
3 
2 
1 
5 
2 

2 

2 

1 
1 

1 
2 
8 
1 
3 
7 
1 
1 
1 
27 
11 
8 


$9,346 09 

918 75 

500 00 

2,163 61 

1,650 00 


$9,469 25 

918 75 

500 00 

2,163 62 

1,650 00 


$5,244 72 


$4,101 37 

918 75 

500 00 

1,087 50 

1,650 00 


$18,815 34 




1,837 50 


Attica 




1,000 00 




1,076 11 


4,327 23 


Aurora 


3,300 00 


^Battle Ground* 






Bedford 

Brazil 


500 00 

1,337 49 

1,779 58 

971 35 

492 19 

666 66 

1,162 50 

1,991 61 

1,459 50 

1,056 66 

2,272 91 

1,371 66 


500 00 

1,337 51 

1,779 59 

971 35 

492 18 

666 66 

1,162 50 

1,991 63 

1,657 50 

1,056 67 

2,272 92 

1,439 17 


100 00 
49 05 
779 58 
971 35 
492 19 


400 00 
1,288 44 
1,000 00 


1,000 00 
2,675 00 


Bremen 

Brookston 


3,559 17 
1,942 70 


Chalmers 


""666'66 
1,162 50 
1,991 61 
1,332 50 


984 37 


Charlestown 


1,333 32 


Clay City 




2,325 00 


ColiiTnhia. nity 




3,983 24 


Cnliimhiia 


127 00 
1,056 66 
1,072 91 

257 41 


3,117 00 


Cory , 


2,113 33 


Corydon ... 


1.200 00 
1,114 25 


4.545 83 


Crawfordsville 

Dayton* 


2.810 83 


Delphi 


1,275 00 
945 00 
3,268 70 
1,506 00 
1,381 12 


1,275 00 
945 00 
3,932 55 
2,017 00 
1,501 88 




1,275 00 
945 00 
363 00 
864 00 

1,320 75 


2,550 00 


DePauw 




1,890 00 


East Chicago 


2,905 70 

642 00 

60 37 


7,201 25 


Elkhart 


3,523 00 


Elwood 


2,883 00 



Used as practice-teaching centers for the teacher-training courses in agriculture at Purdue University. 



84 



Year Book 

TABLE 2. VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS, 1920-21— Continued 



Location 



Evansville 

Fairmount 

Flora 

Forest .• 

Fort Wayne 

Frankfort 

Garrett 

Gary 

Goshen 

Gosport 

Greenfield 

Greensburg 

Hammond , 

Hanover 

Hillsboro 

Huntington 

Indianapolis 

Jackson Twp., Tippecanoe Co. . . . 

Kingman 

Kokomo 

Lake (Richland) 

Lawrenceburg 

Logansport 

Loogootee 

Manilla 

Marion. 

Matthews 

Mauckport 

Metz 

Michigan City 

Mishawaka 

Monticello 

Moores Hill 

Mooresville. 

Morristown 

Mt. Summit 

Mt. Vernon 

Muneie 

New Salisbury 

Owensville 

Palmyra 

Paragon 

Pendleton 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Plainville 

Plymouth. .• 

Reelsville 

Richmond 

Romney 

Rossville 

Scottsburg 

Seymour 

Shelbyville 

South Bend 

Spencer 

Star City 

Stockwell 

Summitville - 

Terre Haute 

Union Twp., Johnson Co 

Veedersburg 

Vevay 

Vincennes. 

Wabash 

Warsaw 

Waterloo 

Wayne Twp., Tippecanoe Co 

W. Lafayette* 

W. Lebanon 

White River Twp., Randolph Co. 

Whiting 

Winamac 

Worthington 

Totals 



No. of 
Pupils 



1,388 
20 
10 
17 

1,414 
33 
17 

2,285 
52 
25 
29 
59 

1,065 

50 

12 

541 

3,205 

25 

23 

678 

29 

30 

499 

21 

17 

302 

7 

12 
19 
303 
75 
61 
42 
28 
30 
21 
21 

1,664 
30 
30 
18 
20 
57 
83 
48 
17 
47 
10 
750 
16 



37 
27 

2,000 
51 
20 
17 
24 

1,909 

16 

50 

24 

269 

176 

85 

24 

18 

10 

12 

17 

224 

37 

50 



23, 766 



No. of 
Teachers 



1 
1 

1 

43 
1 
1 

57 
3 
1 
1 
2 

17 
2 
1 

14 

132 

2 

1 

24 
1 
1 

26 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
6 
8 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

29 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
2 
1 
2 
1 

29 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

68 
2 
1 
1 
1 

46 
1 
2 
1 

11 
9 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 
2 
2 



779 



Reim- 
bursement 



$7,156 87 
371 25 
875 00 

1.036 66 
11,937 27 

1,200 00 

1,145 83 

11,551 

2,005 69 

1,031 25 

1,050 00 

2,050 00 

6,776 95 

1,927 11 

1,000 00 

2,458 53 

36,728 77 

1,173 00 

931 50 

3,587 50 

1,025 00 

168 75 

3,527 95 

1,200 00 

1,181 25 

2,994 

800 00 

962 50 

968 73 

2,563 50 

1,737 75 

1,974 99 

1,739 58 

1,200 00 

1.037 50 
1,200 00 
1,008 33 
6,410 65 

962 50 

1,210 00 

1,050 00 

833 33 

2,166 

214 50 

650 00 

1,025 00 

825 00 

611 10 

5,007 

854 13 

916 66 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

1,150 00 

15,167 91 

1,612 50 

125 00 

950 00 

1,175 00 

18,122 31 

1,000 00 

1,821 87 

1,050 00 

3,377 03 

1,292 00 

1,883 33 

916 66 

675 00 



916 66 

833 33 

681 88 

1,056 66 

1,650 00 



$239,1 



Local 
Funds 



.?9,405 50 
371 25 
875 00 

1.036 67 
13,748 40 

1,200 00 

1,145 84 

13,792 90 

2,005 71 

1,031 25 

1,050 00 

2,050 00 

8,066 95 

1,927 12 

1,000 00 

2,652 80 

40,560 68 

1,173 00 

931 50 

3,850 75 

1,025 00 

281 25 

3,626 60 

1,200 00 

1,181 25 

2,995 01 

800 00 

962 50 

968 74 

4,014 00 

1,737 75 

1,975 01 

1,739 58 

1,200 00 

1.037 50 
1,200 00 
1,008 33 
6,696 

962 50 

1,210 00 

1,050 00 

833 34 

2,166 67 

315 50 

650 00 

1,025 00 

825 00 

611 12 

5,487 61 

854 13 

916 67 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

1,150 00 

18,785 13 

1,612 50 

125 00 

950 00 

1,175 00 

19,238 00 

1,000 00 

1,821 87 

1,050 00 

4,142 04 

1,470 58 

1,883 33 

916 67 

675 00 



916 67 

833 33 

681 89 

1,056 67 

1,650 00 



$261,466 47 



State 
Funds 



.$4,513 27 





1,036 66 
10,653 27 


1,145 83 
9,390 55 
2,005 69 




1,000 00 
6,377 95 
1,927 11 


2,108 28 

29,038 15 

1,173 00 


2,978 25 


56 25 
3,257 95 


1,181 25 
1,653 99 





968 73 

1,113 00 

1,636 75 

837 49 

375 00 



5,769 65 



829 19 

991 66 

172 50 

650 00 

1,025 00 

825 00 



2,607 21 

854 13 

916 66 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

1 , 150 00 

12,720 91 

1,612 50 

125 00 

950 00 

1,175 00 

16,790 51 



1,821 87 
1,050 00 
3,361 03 
1,260 00 
1,883 33 
916 66 
675 00 



916 66 
833 33 



1,056 66 
1,650 00 



1166,449 81 



Federal 
Funds 



$2,643 
371 

875 



1,284 00 
1,200 00 


2,161 36 


1,031 25 

1,050 00 

1,050 00 

399 00 


1,000 00 

350-25 

7,690 62 



931 
609 

1,025 
112 
270 

1,200 



1,341 
800 
962 



1,450 

101 

1,137 

1,364 

1,200 

1,037 

1,200 

1,008 

641 

962 

1,210 

1,050 

4 

1,175 

42 



611 
2,400 



2,447 00 



1,331 80 
1,000 00 



16 00 
32 00 



285 00 



$73,247 05 



Total cost 
for salaries ■ 



$16, 



$501,163 33 



*Used as practice-teaching centers for the teacher-training courses in agriculture at Purdue University. 



Department of Public Instruction 



85 



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86 Year Book 

AGRICULTURE SCHOOLS, 1920-21 

Evidence that the four-year high school course in vocational agri- 
culture is becoming established as a permanent and important part of 
the program of education in the public schools of Indiana is found in 
the fact that the number of schools maintaining vocational courses in 
agriculture has uniformly increased from year to year. The first year 
there were seven schools that maintained vocational agriculture instruc- 
tion. The next year there were fifteen, the next thirty-two, the next 
forty-five, the next thirty-four (reduced on account of shortage of 
teachers due to military service), the next fifty-two, and the last year 
there were seventy. 

Further indication of the permanent development of these courses 
is seen in the increased demand for them that comes unsolicited. Every 
year the demand greatly exceeds the number of available qualified 
teachers. Men of high grade are being attracted to the work and it 
is hoped that a sufficient number to meet the demand will be supplied 
by the training schools in the near future. 

Vocational teachers must be constant students of the many problems 
that confront them. For the assistance of these teachers in the study 
of their problems, state and district conferences are held under the 
direction of the state supervisor. During the year seven district and 
two state conferences were conducted. The district conferences were 
held at points convenient for a group of from eight to twelve teachers. 
One state conference was held in connection with the State Teachers' 
Meeting at Indianapolis, and one at Purdue University from June 13 to 
18, inclusive. 

Under the general direction of the state supervisor the vocational 
teachers issued monthly from September to June, inclusive, a vocational 
digest or news-letter. The consensus of opinion among the teachers is 
that each received highly valuable assistance from the suggestions and 
the information contained in the several numbers of the digest. 

During the year evening classes meeting from six to ten weeks and 
from two to four hours per week, with a total enrollment of 125, were 
conducted by the vocational teachers at Marion, Elwood, Moores Hill, 
and Gosport. The work consisted of laboratory exercises, round table 
discussions, and lectures on such special subjects as poultry, orcharding, 
dairy husbandry, and soil fertility. 

Each of the vocational agriculture teachers in all-day schools con- 
ducts part-time work with boys over fourteen years of age who are not 
enrolled in all-day or full-time classes. The greater part of such work 
is done during the crop production period. The boys carry out projects 
in corn growing, swine production, poultry raising, potato growing, 
orchard management, cattle feeding and management. For the year 
ended June 30, 1921, a total of 778 boys in these part-time classes com- 
pleted projects under the supervision of vocational teachers. The value 
of their products was $72,437, and the net profit realized was $30,703. 

The following table gives further information regarding the seventy 
schools in the State conducting full-time or all-day classes in vocational 
agriculture for the year ended June 30, 1921. 



Department of Public Instruction 

table 4. agriculture schools, 1920-21 



87 



Location 



I 



I 



Angola 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Battle Ground* 

Brazil 

Bremen 

Brookston 

Chalmers 

Charlestown 

Clay City 

Columbia City 

Columbus 

Cory 

Corydon 

Crawfordsville 

Dayton* 

Delphi 

DePauw 

Elwood 

Flora 

Forest 

Frankfort 

Garrett 

Gosport 

Greenfield 

Greensburg 

Hanover 

Hillsboro 

Indianapolis 

Jackson Twp., Tippecanoe Co. 

Kingman 

Lake 

Loogootee 

Mamlla 

Marion 

Matthews 

Mauckport 

Metz 

Monticello 

Moores Hill 

Mooresville 

Morristown 

Mt. Summit 

Mt. Vernon 

New Salisbury 

Owensville 

Palmyra 

Paragon 

Pendleton 

Plainville 

Reelsville 

Romney 

Rossville 

Scottsburg 

Seymour 

Shelbyville 

Spencer 

Stockwell 

Summitville .- . 

Union Twp., Johnson Co 

Veedersburg 

Vevay 

Warsaw 

Waterloo 

Wayne Twp. Tippecanoe Co. 

W.Lafayette* 

W. Lebanon 

White River Twp., Randolph 

Winamac 

Worthington 

Total 



No. of 
Pupils 



1.530 



No. of 
Teachers 



Reimburse- 
ment 



$918 75 

1,076 11 

750 00 



1,175 00 
1,000 00 

492 

492 19 

666 66 
1,162 50 
1,108 32 
1,042 50 
1,056 66 
1,200 00 

960 00 



1,275 00 
945 00 

1,200 00 
875 00 

1.036 66 
1,200 00 
1,145 83 
1,031 25 
1,050 00 
1,050 00 

947 11 

1,000 00 

750 00 

675 00 

931 50 

1,025 00 

1,200 00 

1,181 25 

1,200 00 

800 00 

962 50 

968 73 

1,137 50 

1,364 58 

1,200 00 

1.037 50 
1,200 00 
1,008 33 

962 50 

1,210 00 

1,050 00 

833 33 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

611 10 

854 13 

916 66 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

1,150 00 

1,162 50 

950 00 

1,175 00 

1,000 00 

921 87 

1,050 00 

1,050 00 

916 66 

675 00 



833 33 
125 00 
687 50 



$65,949 86 



Local 

Funds 



S918 75 

1,076 12 

750 00 



1,175 00 

1,000 00 

492 18 

492 18 

666 66 

1,162 50 

1,108 34 

1,042 50 

1,056 67 

1,200 00 

960 00 



1,275 00 
945 00 

1,200 00 
875 00 

1.036 67 
1,200 00 
1,145 84 
1,031 25 
1,050 00 
1,050 00 

947 12 

1,000 00 

750 00 

675 00 

931 50 

1,025 00 

1,200 00 

1,181 25 

1,200 00 

800 00 

962 50 

968 74 

1,137 50 

1,364 58 

1,200 00 

1.037 50 
1,200 00 
1,008 33 

962 50 

1,210 00 

1,050 00 

833 34 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

611 12 

854 13 

916 67 

1,175 00 

1,025 00 

1,150 00 

1,162 50 

950 00 

1,175 00 

1,000 00 

921 87 

1,050 00 

1,050 00 

916 67 

675 00 



916 67 

833 33 
125 00 
687 50 



S65,949 



State 
Funds 



SI, 076 



492 19 
492 



1,056 



1,036 66 
1J45'83 



947 11 



675 00 



1,181 25 



968 73 



829 



1,025 00 



854 13 
916 66 
1,175 00 
1,025 00 
1,150 00 
1,162 50 
950 00 
1,175 00 



921 87 

1,050 00 

1,050 00 

916 66 

675 00 



916 66 

833 33 
125 00 

687 50 



$26,510 23 



Federal 
Funds 



$918 75 



750 00 



1,175 00 
1,000 00 



666 66 
1,162 50 
1,108 32 
1,042 50 



1,200 00 
960 00 



1,275 00 
945 00 

1,200 00 
875 00 



1,200 00 



1,031 25 
1,050 00 
1,050 00 



1,000 00 
750 00 



931 50 
1,025 00 
1,200 00 



1,200 00 
800 00 
962 50 



1,137 50 
1,364 58 
1,200 00 
1,037 50 
1,200 00 
1,008 33 
962 50 
1,210 00 
1,050 00 
4 14 
1,175 00 



611 10 



1,000 00 



$39,439 63 



Total co«t 
for Salaries 



$1,837 50 
2,152 23 
\,!m 00 



2,. 350 00 
2,000 00 
984 37 
984 37 
1,333 32 
2,325 00 
2,216 66 
2,085 00 
2,113 33 
2,400 00 
1,920 00 



2,550 00 
1,890 00 
2,400 00 
,750 00 
,073 33 
,400 00 
,291 67 
,062 50 
,100 00 
,100 00 
,894 23 
,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,350 00 
1,863 00 
2,050 00 
2,400 00 
2,362 50 
2,400 00 
1,600 00 
1,925 00 
1,937 47 
2,275 00 
2,729 16 
2,400 00 
2,075 00 
2,400 00 
2,016 66 
1,925 00 
2,420 00 
2,100 00 
1,666 67 
2,350 00 
2,050 00 
1,222 22 
1,708 26 
1,833 33 
2,350 00 
2,050 00 
2,300 00 
2,325 00 
1,900 00 
2,350 00 
2,000 00 
1,843 74 
2,100 00 
2,100 00 
1,833 33 
1,350 00 



1.833 33 

1,666 66 

250 00 

1,375 00 



1131,899 84 



Used as practice-teaching centers for the teacher-training courses in agriculture at Purdue University. 



88 Year Book 

HOME ECONOMICS SCHOOLS, 1920-21 

During the year 1920-21 the greatest growth in vocational home 
economics in Indiana was in the full-time schools. As indicated in the 
table below, the number of full-time schools meeting the standards of 
the Federal and State Boards for Vocational Education shows an in- 
crease of 37 per cent, with a gain in enrolment of 50 per cent. 

In the evening schools in the State there was a gain in enrolment 
of 835 although the number of cities maintaining evening courses in 
home economics dropped from twenty-eight in 1919-20 to twenty-five 
in 1920-21. 

In 1920-21 one city maintained part-time courses in home economics 
for housewives, for which reimbursement was granted from State funds. 

TABLE 5. HOME ECONOMICS SCHOOLS, 1919-20 and 1920-21 
1919-1920 





No. of 
Cities 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 
Teachers 


Amt. of 
Reimbursement 


Full-time 


24 

28 


740 
6,795 


34 
166 


$20,778 73 


Evening 


15,598 81 


Total 


*41 


7,535 


■ 200 


$36 377 54 







1920-1921 





No. of 
Cities 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 
Teachers 


Amt. of 
Reimbursement 


Full-time ... 


33 

1 
25 


1,165 

680 

7,630 


47 

19 

199 


$28,509 04 


Part-time 

Evening 

Supervision 


2,299 87 
15,358 90 
2,075 15 












Total 


*47 


9,475 


265 


$48,242 96 







"Different cities. 



For each year, 1919-20 and 1920-21, home economics for employed 
girls 14-16 years of age was taught in all general continuation schools 
for girls, the number of schools in 1920-21 being twenty-two. Reim- 
bursement each year was made from the Industrial funds. 

As in the past, teacher-training conferences were held. These in- 
cluded five regional meetings of two days each and a State conference 
held the last two weeks in June which was attended by all home eco- 
nomic teachers in full-time schools. 



Department of Public Instruction 



89 



table 6. HOME ECONOMICy SCHOOLS IN FULL-TIME, I'ART-TIME, Oil EVENING 

CLASSES. 1920-21. 



Location 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 

Teachers 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Local 

Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total cost 
for Salaries 




692 
14 
50 
36 
61 
15 
24 
16 

^ 

25 
46 
43 

166 

478 
20 

427 
1,324 
52 
20 
90 
23 

284 

1,699 

16 

196 

271 

140 
29 
28 
14 

834 
28 
17 
47 

283 

595 
17 
20 

736 

24 

. 160 

104 
40 

149 
27 
34 


15 
1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
8 
1 

12 

27 
3 
1 
2 
1 
7 

62 
1 
3 

11 
4 

? 

1 
11 
1 
1 
2 
9 
22 
1 
1 
19 
1 
5 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 


1,644 25 
500 00 

1,087 50 
900 00 
200 00 
162 49 
779 58 
479 16 
883 29 
36 00 

1,072 91 
36 75 
94 00 
180 00 

1,057 60 
371 25 

3,014 99 

3,730 96 

2,005 69 

1,000 00 
195 00 
980 00 

1,273 16 

6,065 37 
498 00 
199 50 

1,481 67 

283 50 

142 50 

' 837 49 

375 00 

1,420 00 
991 66 
300 00 
825 00 
303 44 

1,721 60 
450 00 
125 00 

5,418 24 
900 00 
311 25 
928 16 
833 33 
253 51 
931 66 
962 50 


1,644 25 
500 00 

1,087 50 
900 00 
200 00 
162 51 
779 59 
479 17 
883 29 
36 00 

1,072 92 
36 75 
94 00 
180 00 

1,057 60 
371 25 

3,015 01 

3,730 95 

2,005 71 

1,000 00 
195 00 
980 00 

1,273 17 

7,598 63 
498 00 
199 50 

1,481 68 
283 50 
142 50 
837 51 
375 00 

1,420 00 
991 67 
300 00 
825 00 
303 44 

1,721 62 
450 00 
125 00 

5,418 26 
900 00 
311 25 
928 17 
833 33 
253 51 
931 67 
962 50 




1,644 25 
500 00 

1,087 .50 
900 00 
200 00 
113 44 


3,288 50 
1,000 00 
2,175 00 
1 800 00 


Attica 








Aurora 




Bedford 




400 00 


Brazil 


49 05 
779 58 
479 16 


325 00 
1 559 17 


Bremen 


Brookston 




958 33 


Columbia Cifv 


883 29 
36 00 


1,766 58 
72 00 


Columbus 


Corydon 


1,072 91 


2 145 83 


Crawfordsville 


36 75 
94 00 
180 00 


73 50 








Elkhart 




360 00 


Evansville 


1,057 60 

" 2;299'99 

3,7.30 96 

2,005 69 

1,000 00 

195 00 

980 00 

1,273 16 

6,065 37 

498 00 

199 50 

1,481 67 

283 50 

142 50 

837 49 

375 00 

1,420 00 

991 66 

300 00 

825 00 

303 44 

1,721 60 

450 00 

125 00 

5,418 24 

900 00 

311 25 

928 16 

833 33 

253 51 

931 66 

962 50 


2 115 20 




371 25 
715 00 


742 50 
6,030 00 
7,461 91 
4,011 40 
2 000 00 


Fort Wayne 


Gary 


Goshen 




Greensburg 




Hammond 




390 00 


Hanover 




1 960 00 


Huntington 




2,546 33 

13,664 00 

996 00 


Indianapolis 




Jackson Twp. Tippecanoe Co. 




Kokomo 




399 00 


Logansport 




2 963 35 


Marion 




567 00 


Mishawaka 




285 00 


Monticello 




1 675 00 


Moores Hill 




750 00 


Muncie 




2,840 00 


Pendleton 




1 983 33 


Petersburg 




600 00 






1 650 00 


Richmond 




606 88 


South Bend 




3,443 22 
900 00 


Spencer 




Star City 




250 00 


Terre Haute 




10,836 50 
1 800 00 






Vincennes 




622 50 


Wabash 




1,856 33 


Warsaw . . 




1 666 66 


Whiting 




507 02 


Winamac 




1 863 33 






1,925 00 








Total 


9,475 


265 


$48,242 96 


$49,776 41 


$41,481 48 


$6,761 48 


$98,019 37 


TABLE 7. 


FULL-TIME SCHOOLS IN 


HOME EC 


ONOMICS, 


1920-21. 




Location 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 
Teachers 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Local 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total cost 
for Salaries 




24 
14 
50 
36 
15 
24 
16 
31 
25 
27 
20 
46 
128 


2 
1 
2 

3 
2 


$850 00 
500 00 

1.087 50 
900 00 
162 49 
779 58 
479 16 
883 29 

1,072 91 
400 00 
371 25 

2,299 99 

1,227 35 


$850 00 
500 00 

1,087 50 
900 00 
162 51 

• 779 59 
479 17 
883 29 

1,072 92 
400 00 
371 25 

2,300 01 

1,227 35 




$850 00 

500 00 

1,087 50 

900 00 

113 44 


SI. 701 00 


Attica 




1,000 00 


Auburn . . 




2,175 00 






1,800 00 


Brazil , 

RrPTnpn 


$49 05 
779 58 
479 16 


325 00 
1 559 17 


Brookston . 


88329 


958 33 
1,766 58 


Corydon 

Evansville 


1,072 91 
400 00 


2,145 83 




800 00 




371 25 


742 50 


Fort Wayne 


2,299 99 
1,227 35 


4,600 00 


Gary 




2.454 70 



90 Year Book 

TABLE 7. FULL-TIME SCHOOLS IN HOME ECONOMICS, 1920-21— Continued 



Location 



Greensburg 

Hanover 

Huntington 

Jackson Twp. Tippecanoe Co 

Logansport 

Monticello 

Moores Hill 

Pendleton 

Petersburg 

Plymouth 

South Bend 

Spencer 

Star City 

Terre Haute 

Veedersburg 

Wabash 

Warsaw 

Winamac 

Worthington 

Total 



No. of 
Pupils 



l.K 



No. of 
Teachers 



Reimburse- 
ment 



$1,975 70 
1,000 00 
980 00 
916 66 
498 00 
1,047 61 
837 49 
375 00 
991 66 
300 00 
810 00 
250 00 
450 00 
125 00 
2,456 25 
900 00 
854 16 
833 33 
931 66 
962 50 



$28,509 04 



Local 
Funds 



$1,975 

1,000 
980 
916 
498 

1,047 
837 
375 
991 
300 
810 
250 
450 
125 

2,456 
900 
854 
833 

. 931 
962 



$28,509 18 $23,803 



State 
Funds 



975 70 
000 00 
980 00 
916 66 
498 00 
047 61 
837 49 
375 00 
991 66 
300 00 
810 00 
250 00 
450 00 
125 00 
456 25 
900 00 
854 16 
833 33 
931 66 
962 50 



Federal 
Funds 



Total cost 
for Salaries 



$3,951 40 

2,000 00 

1,960 00 

1,833 33 

996 00 

2,095 23 

1,675 00 

750 00 

1,983 33 

600 00 

1,620 00 

500 00 

900 00 

250 00 

4,912 50 

1,800 00 

1,708 33 

1,666 66 

1,863 33 

1,925 00 



$4,705 98 $57,018 22 



TABLE 8. PART-TIME SCHOOLS IN HOME ECONOMICS, 1920-21. 



Location 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 
Teachers 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Local 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total cost 
for Salaries 


Indianapolis 


680 


19 


$2,299 87 


$3,833 13 


$2,299 87 




$6 133 00 









TABLE 9. EVENING SCHOOLS IN HOME ECONOMICS, 1920-21. 



Location 



No. of 
Pupils 



No. of 
Teachers 



Reimburse- 
ment 



Local 
Funds 



State 
Funds 



Federal 
Funds 



Total cost 
for Salaries 



Anderson 

Bedford 

Columbus. . . . 
Crawfordsville. 
East Chicago.. 

Elkhart 

Evansville . . . . 
Fort Wayne... 

Gary 

Goshen 

Hammond 

Huntington . . . 
Indianapolis. . 

Kokomo 

Logansport . . . 

Marion 

Mishawaka . . . 

Muncie 

Plymouth 

Richmond . . . . 
South Bend. . . 
Terre Haute . . 
Viacennes. . . . 

Wabash 

Whiting 

Total 



61 

30 

46 

43 

166 

451 

381 

1,196 

12 

90 

246 

1,019 

196 

214 

140 

29 

834 

18 

283 

574 

553 

160 

71 

149 



$793 75 

200 00 

36 00 

36 75 

94 00 

180 00 

552 60 

715 00 

2,503 61 

29 99 

195 00 

356 50 

3,765 50 

199 50 

270 00 

283 50 

142 50 

1,337 50 

15 00 

303 44 

610 50 

2,099 50 

311 25 

74 00 

253 51 



$793 75 

200 00 

36 00 

36 75 

94 00 

180 00 

552 60 

715 00 

2,503 60 

30 01 

195 00 

356 50 

3,765 50 

199 50 

270 00 

283 50 

142 50 

1,337 50 

15 00 

303 44 

610 50 

2,099 50 

311 25 

74 00 

253 51 



$552 



2,503 61 

29 99 

195 00 

356 50 

3,765 50 

' 199 50 

270 00 

283 50 

142 50 

1,337 50 

15 00 

303 44 

610 50 

2,099 50 

311 25 

74 00 

253 51 



$793 75 
200 00 
36 00 
36 75 
94 00 
180 00 



715 00 



$1,587 50 
400 00 

72 00 

73 50 
188 00 
360 00 

1,105 20 

1,430 00 

5,007 21 

60 00 

390 00 

713 00 

7,531 00 

399 00 

540 00 

567 00 

285 00 

2,675 00 

30 00 

606 88 

1,221 00 

4,199 00 

622 50 

148 00 

507 02 



7.630 



199 



$15,358 90 $15,358 91 $13,303 40 $2,055 50 $30,717 81 



Department of Public Instruction 

table 10. local supervisionj^of home economics schools, 1920-21. 



91 



Location 


No. of 
Supervisors 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Local 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total coat 
for Salaries 






$105 00 
104 06 
82 50 

861 10 

862 49 


$105 00 
164 06 
82 50 

861 12 

862 51 


$105 00 
164 06 
82 50 

861 10 

862 49 




$210 00 
328 12 


Logansport 




Muncie 




South Bend 




1 722 22 


Terre Haute 




1 725 00 








Total 


6 


$2,075 15 


12,075 19 


$2,075 15 




14,150 34 









INDUSTRY SCHOOLS, 1920-21 



FULL-TIME SCHOOLS 



Full-time or all-day trade schools were in operation in seventeen 
cities offering courses in the following trades: 



Auto-mechanics 

Cabinet-making 

Carpentry 

Drafting 

Electricity 



Forge practice 

Founding 

Machine shop practice 

Pattern-making 

Printing 



The plan of the full-time school provides for a thirty-hour week. 
One-half of this time is devoted to practical shop work on a useful or 
productive basis. 

All schools are encouraged to keep closely in touch with local in- 
dustries. Blue prints and material furnished from local plants are often 
used in the shop work of pupils. 

Complete machines for school use are produced wherever possible, 
the school shops and drafting room being used for the five steps of 
production, namely, designing, drafting, pattern-making, casting and 
machining. 

PART-TIME SCHOOLS 

Five cities established part-time general continuation schools for 
the first time in 1920-21, with compulsory attendance for the ages 14 
to 16. In part-time schools in operation in sixteen cities during both 
the years 1919-20 and 1920-21 the attendance increased from 2,952 to 
4,762. Three cities added commercial extension courses to their list 
of part-time courses. In these commercial courses, the store and office 
work of pupils was carefully supervised by the instructors. Twenty-two 
cities now have part-time schools with compulsory attendance for the 
ages 14 to 16. One other city has part-time schools without compulsory 
attendance. 

In addition to the usual general subjects such as civics, English, 
arithmetic, hygiene and safety, the following trade extension subjects 
were taught in part-time schools: 



92 Year Book 

(a) Machine shop practice — Offered to boys who planned to be 
machine workers. 

(b) Printing — Offered to apprentices in the printing trade and 
credited hour for hour on a printing apprenticeship course recognized 
by the unions. 

(c) Salesmanship — Offered to store workers who are employed 
about one-half time in retail stores. 

(d) Typewriting — Offered to workers who felt that it was the 
training necessary for promotion. 

(e) Woodworking — Offered to boys in cabinet-making trades. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Twenty-four cities offered evening trade extension courses in the 
following subjects: 

Autogenous welding Electricity 

Auto mechanics Forging 

Blue print reading Industrial chemistry 

Drafting Machine design 

(a) Architectural Machine shop practice 

(b) Machine Telegraphy 

(c) Sheet metal 

(d) Stone 

Evening trade extension courses are intended to supplement the 
daily occupation of the worker. For instance, machine operators often 
find that a short unit course in blue print reading is helpful as are 
also classes in mathematics applied to shop problems. 

It is sometimes difficult to secure satisfactory instructors for trade 
extension courses in evening schools. One practical solution of the prob- 
lem is to select men directly from the local industries. Many highly 
trained industrial foremen and executives are performing this teaching 
service at a wage-rate much lower than what they receive in industry. 
The best evening schools are conducted in cities where the industry and 
the school are working in close co-operation. 



CONFERENCES 

As in former years, teacher-training conferences were held. These 
included four regional meetings of two days each for a discussion of 
problems connected with teaching in industrial schools. 



Department of Public Instruction 93 

table n. industry schools in full-time, part-time, or evening classes, 1920-21 



Location 



No. of 
Pupils 



No. of 
Teachers 



Reimburse- 
ment 



Local 
Funds 



State 
Funds 



Federal 
Funds 



Total cost 
for Salaries 



Anderson 

Bedford 

Columbus. . . . 
Crawfordsville 
East Chicago. . 

Elkhart 

Elwood 

Evansville . . . . 
Ft. Wayne. . . . 

Gary 

Hammond . . . . 
Huntington . . . 
Indianapolis. . 

Kokomo 

Lawrenceburg . 
Logansport . . . 

Marion 

Michigan City 
Mishawaka . . . 

Muncie 

Peru 

Petersburg. . . . 
Richmond . . . . 
South Bend... 
Terre Haute . . 
Vincennes. . . . 

Wabash 

Whiting 

Total 



685 
133 
102 

61 
481 
211 

49 
910 
98i( 
961 
975 
257 
,484 
482 

30 
228 
131 
303 

46 
830 

83 

31 
467 
,405 
,173 
109 

72 

75 



$7,701 84 

300 00 

381 00 

374 91 

3,174 70 

1,326 00 

181 12 

6,099 27 

8,922 28 

7,820 95 

6,581 95 

1,185 37 

29,913 40 

3,388 00 

168 75 

2,046 28 

1,511 49 

2,563 50 

1,595 25 

4,990 65 

214 50 

350 00 

4,704 46 

13,446 31 

12,704 07 

3,065 78 

363 84 

428 37 



17,825 00 

300 00 
579 00 
442 42 

3,838 55 
1,837 00 

301 88 
8,347 90 

10,733 39 

10,061 95 

7,871 95 

1,379 63 

32,212 05 

3,651 25 

281 25 

2,144 92 

1,511 51 

4,014 00 

1,595 25 

5,276 68 

315 50 

350 00 

5,184 17 

17,063 51 

13,819 74 

3,830 7« 

542 41 

428 38 



.f5,244 72 

100 00 

127 00 

257 41 

2,905 70 

642 00 

60 37 

3,455 67 

8,353 28 

5,659 59 

6,182 95 

835 12 

22,972 78 

2,778 75 

56 25 

1,776 28 

1,370 49 

1,113 00 

1,494 25 

4,349 65 

172 50 

350 00 

2,303 77 

10,999 31 

11,372 27 

3,049 78 

331 84 

143 37 



S2,457 12 
200 00 
254 00 
117 50 

269 00 
684 00 
120 75 

2,643 60 
569 00 

2,161 36 
399 00 
350 25 

6,940 62 
609 25 
112 50 

270 00 
141 00 

1,450 50 
101 00 
641 00 
42 00 



2,400 69 

2,447 00 

1,331 80 

16 00 

32 00 

285 00 



12,761 444 



$125,504 04 



$145,740 08 



$98,458 10 



$27,045 94 



?)5,526 84 

600 (KJ 

960 00 

817 33 

7,013 25 

3,163 00 

483 00 

14,447 17 

19,6.55 67 

17,882 90 

14,4.53 90 

2,565 00 

62,125 45 

7,039 25 

450 00 

4,191 20 

3,023 00 

6,577 .50 

3,190 50 

10,267 33 

530 00 

700 00 

9,888 63 

30,. 509 82 

26,523 81 

6,896 57 

906 25 

856 75 



$271,244 12 



TABLE 12. FULL-TIME SCHOOLS IN INDUSTRY, 1920-21 



Location 



No. of 
Pupils 



No. of 
Teachers 



Reimburse- 
ment 



Local 
Funds 



State 
Funds 



Federal 
Funds 



Total cost 
for Salaries 



Anderson 

East Chicago. . 
Evansville . . . . 
Fort Wayne. . 

Gary 

Indianapolis. . 
Kokomo. . ., . . 
Logansport . . . 

Marion 

Michigan City 
Mishawaka . . . 

Muncie 

Petersburg. . . . 
Richmond . . . . 
South Bend... 
Terre Haute . . 
Vincennes . . . . 

Total 



$5,760 91 

425 00 

364 00 

4,101 69 

2,363 76 

17,436 25 

1,275 00 

500 85 

199 99 

387 75 

1,443 75 

2,754 16 

350 00 

2,567 00 

5,606 07 

8,948 60 

694 28 



$5,760 93 

425 00 

364 00 

4,101 73 

2,363 76 

17,436 25 

1,275 00 

500 85 

200 01 

387 75 

1,443 75 

2,754 17 

350 00 

2,567 00 

5,606 08 

8,948 60 

694 29 



$3,760 91 

425 00 

364 00 

4,101 69 

2,363 76 

15,436 25 

1,275 00 

500 85 

199 99 

387 75 

1,433 75 

2,754 16 

350 00 

567 00 

5,606 07 

8,237 80 

694 28 



.12,000 00 



2,000 00 
''71080 



$11,521 84 

850 00 

728 00 

8,203 42 

4,727 52 

34,872 50 

2,550 00 

1.001 70 

400 00 

775 50 

2,887 50 

5,508 33 

700 00 

5,134 00 

11,212 15 

17,897 20 

1.388 57 



$55,179 06 



$55,179 17 



$48,468 26 



$6,710 80 



$110,358 23 



94 



Year Book 

table 13. part-time schools in industry, 1920-21 



Location 



No. of 
Pupils 



No. of 
Teachers 



Reimburse- 
ment 



Local 
Funds 



State 
Funds 



Federal 
Funds 



Total cost 
for Salaries 



Anderson 

Columbus. . . . 
Crawfordsville. 
East Chicago. . 

Elkhart 

Elwood 

Evansville* . . . 
Fort Wayne. . . 

Gary 

Hammond** . . 
Huntington . . . 
Indianapolis . . 

Kokomo 

Lawrenceburg . 
Logansport . . . 
Michigan City . 

Muncie 

Peru 

Richmond .... 
South Bend... 
Terre Haute . . 
Vincennes .... 
Wabash 



55 

52 

26 

234 

107 

49 

520 

599 

469 

779 

110 

174 

99 

30 

48 

287 

93 

41 

309 

986 

541 

80 

55 



$184 68 

297 00 

101 25 

995 70 

766 50 

181 12 

3,791 90 

2,716 59 

2,115 54 

4,959 10 

291 37 

3,447 93 

394 88 

168 75 

147 93 

2,175 75 

429 00 

151 50 

344 50 

5,425 74 

1,260 97 

1,147 50 

201 09 



$307 82 

495 00 

160 75 

1,659 55 

1,277 50 

301 88 

6,040 52 

4,527 66 

3,525 90 

6,249 10 

485 63 

5,746 57 

658 12 

281 25 

246 57 

3,626 25 

715 00 

252 50 

574 19 

9,042 93 

2,101 64 

1,912 50 

335 16 



$61 

99 

33 

995 

255 

60 

1,543 

2,716 

705 

4,959 

97 

1,149 

130 

56 

147 

725 

429 

151 

74 

3,425 

1,260 

1,147 

201 



$123 12 
198 00 

67 50 



511 00 
120 75 

2,248 60 



1,410 36 



194 25 

2,298 62 

264 25 

112 50 



1,450 50 



2,000 00 



$492 50 

792 00 

270 00 

2,655 25 

2,044 00 

483 00 

9,832 42 

7,244 25 

5,641 44 

11,208 20 

777 00 

9,194 50 

1,053 00 

450 00 

394 50 

5,802 00 

1,144 00 

404 00 

918 69 

14,468 67 

3,362 61 

3,060 00 

536 25 



Total 5,748 155 



$31, 



29 $50,531 99 $20,427 15 $11,269 14 $82,228 28 



*$419.00 of this amount is reimbursement for part-time trade work and was reimbursed on a 50% 
All other cities reimbursed on a 373^% basis. 

**$3,024.14 of this amount is reimbursement for part-time trade work. See note above. 



TABLE 14. EVENING SCHOOLS IN INDUSTRY, 1920-21. 



Location 


No. of 
Pupils 


No. of 
Teachers 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Local 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total cost 
for Salaries 




476 

133 

50 

35 

202 

104 

374 

321 

378 

196 

147 

1,004 

330 

159 

107 

20 

644 

42 

98 

234 

431 

10 

17 

75 


13 
3 

2 
2 
6 
5 
10 
10 
8 
6 
3 

34 
9 
7 
2 
2 
9 
3 
5 
7 

I 

1 
5 


$506 25 

300 00 

84 00 

75 00 

404 00 

259 50 

593 37 

854 00 

1,127 32 

598 50 

234 00 

3,963 75 

518 12 

310 00 

211 50 

151 50 

962 49 

63 00 

196 50 

671 25 

932 00 

24 00 

48 00 

428 37 


$506 25 

300 00 

84 00 

75 00 

404 00 

259 50 

593 38 

854 00 

1,127 34 

598 50 

234 00 

3,963 75 

518 13 

310 00 

211 50 

151 50 

962 51 

63 00 

196 50 

671 25 

932 00 

24 00 

48 00 

428 38 


$172 25 
100 00 
28 00 
25 00 
135 00 
86 50 

198 37 
285 00 
376 32 

199 50 
78 00 

1,321 75 

173 12 

40 00 

70 50 

50 50 

321 49 

21 00 

65 50 

224 25 

311 00 

,8 00 

16 00 

143 37 


$334 00 

200 00 

56 00 

50 00 

269 00 
173 00 
395 00 
569 00 
751 00 
399 00 
156 00 

2,642 00 
345 00 

270 00 
141 00 
101 00 
641 00 

42 00 
131 00 
447 00 
621 00 
16 00 
32 00 
285 00 


$1 012 50 


Bedford 


600 00 


Columbus 


168 00 




150 00 


East Chicago 


808 00 


Elkhart 


519 00 


Evansville 

Fort Wayne 


1,186 75 
1,708 00 


Gary 


2,254 66 


Hammond 


1,197 00 
468 00 




7,927 50 




1,036 25 


Logansport 

Marion . 


620 00 
423 00 




303 00 


Muncie ... ... 


1,925 00 


Peru 


126 00 


Richmond 

South Bend 


393 00 
1,342 50 


Terre Haute , 


1,864 00 
48 00 


Wabash 


96 00 


Whiting 


856 75 






Total 


5,587 


160 


$13,516 42 


$13,516 49 


$4,450 42 


$9,066 00 


$27,032 91 



Department of Public Instruction 

table 15. local supervision of industry schools, 1920-21. 



95 



Location 



Crawfordsville, 
East Chicago . 

Elkhart 

Evansville. . . . 
Fort Wayne. . . 

Gary 

Hammond 

Huntington . . . 
Indianapolis. . . 

Kokomo 

Logansport.... 

Marion 

Muncie 

Richmond . . . . 
South Bend. . . 
Terre Haute. . , 
Vincennes 

Total 



No. of 
Supervisors 



38 



Reimburse- 
ment 



$1,250 00 

198 66 
1,350 00 

300 00 
1,350 00 
1,250 00 
2,214 33 
1,024 35 

660 00 
5,065 47 
1,200 00 
1,087 50 
1,100 00 

845 00 
1,596 46 
1,743 25 
1,562 50 
1,200 00 

114 75 



$25,112 27 



Local 

Funds 



$1,250 00 

198 67 
1,350 00 

300 00 
1,350 00 
1,250 00 
3,044 95 
1,024 35 

660 00 
5,065 48 
1,200 00 
1,087 50 
1,100 00 

845 00 
1,846 48 
1,743 25 
1,837 50 
1,200 00 

159 25 



$26,512 43 



State 
Funds 



•SI, 250 00 

198 06 
1,350 00 

300 00 
1,350 00 
1,250 00 
2,214 33 
1,024 35 

660 00 
5,065 47 
1,200 00 
1,087 50 
1 , 100 00 

845 00 
1,590 46 
1,743 25 
1,562 50 
1,200 00 

114 75 



$25,112 27 



Federal 
Funds 



Total co8t 
for Salaries 



?2,500 00 

397 33 

2,700 00 

600 00 

2,700 00 

2,500 00 

5,259 28 

2,048 70 

1,320 00 

10,130 95 

2,400 00 

2,175 00 

2,200 00 

1,690 00 

3,442 94 

3,486 50 

3,400 00 

2,400 00 

274 00 



$51,624 70 



VOCATIONAL TRANSFER PUPILS, 1920-21 

Persons residing in a school corporation which does not maintain 
an approved vocational course may be transferred to another school 
corporation which does maintain such a course. The trustee of the 
township in which the pupil resides is reimbursed for half of the tuition 
of such pupil. Tables 16 and 17 give detailed information on reim- 
bursement, etc., for transfer pupils for 1920-21. Table 21 shows the 
rapid increase in number of transfer pupils, etc., since the year 1914-15. 
An increase of about 100 per cent each year during the last five years 
is shown in the number of transfer pupils and in the amount of reim- 
bursement. 

TABLE 16. VOCATIONAL TRANSFER PUPILS, 1920-21 



Location of School 

attended .by Transfer 

Pupils 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Industry 


Total 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 












$516 37 


14 


$516 37 
909 85 
237 87 

1,825 56 
679 50 
52 64 
983 51 

1,075 34 

399 00 

99 36 

157 50 

162 72 

1,645 88 
573 00 
342 96 

1,488 90 
747 02 
536 36 
468 47 
393 75 
593 20 

1.057 17 


14 




$909 85 


18 






18 


Attica 


$237 87 

1,089 89 

234 00 


6 
20 

7 






6 




735 67 
445 50 
52 64 
983 51 
533 09 
285 00 
99 36 
157 50 
162 72 

1,160 46 
573 00 
171 48 

1,488 90 
747 02 
536 36 


14 

13 

1 

24 

11 

5 

3 

5 

4 

26 
24 
4 

36 
21 
19 






34 


Aurora 






20 


Battle Ground 






1 


Brazil 










24 




542 25 
114 00 


11 
- 2 






22 


Brookston 






7 








3 


Charlestown 










5 


Clay City 










4 


Columbia City 


485 42 


12 






38 


Cnliinnhii=! 






24 




171 48 


4 






8 








36 


Delphi 










21 


Elwood 










19 


Fairmount 


468 47 


7 






7 


Flora 


393 75 


8 






8 


Ft. Wayne 


86 96 


2 


516 24 


14 


16 


Frankfort 


1,057 17 


31 


31 



96 



Year Book 

TABLE 16. VOCATIONAL TRANSFER PUPILS, 1920-21— Continued 



Location of School 

attended by Transfer 

Pupils 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Industry 


Total 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Reim- 
bursement 


No. of 
Pupils 


Forest .... 


$204 40 
586 34 
153 17 
788 53 
909 72 
133 00 


5 
12 

5 
19 

24 

7 










$204 40 
586 34 
153 17 
788 53 
1,263 12 
285 00 

56 00 

202 50 

86 00 

442 28 

650 25 

281 25 

795 00 

111 92 

115 68 

1,376 84 

225 00 

481 50 

129 28 

765 18 

407 00 

532 80 

199 12 

$177 83 

262 92 

401 44 

593 81 

1,220 08 

888 00 

414 00 

1,100 92 

1,466 93 

693 64 

1,834 53 

1,156 20 

58 08 
156 44 
220 95 
585 00 
850 77 


5 


Garrett 










12 












5 


Greenfield 










19 




$353 40 
152 00 

56 00 


9 

8 

2 






33 


Hanover 






15 


Jackson Twp . 






2 


Kingman... 

Lake (Luce Twp.) 


202 50 
86 00 


5 

2 






5 










2 


442 28 


11 






11 




650 25 
281 25 
795 00 
111 92 
115 68 
809 32 
187 50 
481 50 
129 28 
765 18 
209 00 


17 

il 

2 

2 
20 

5 
12 

4 
19 

5 






17 


Manilla 










5 












18 


Matthews 











2 


Metz 










2 


Monticello 


567 52 
37 50 


14 
1 






34 


Moores Hill 






6 


Mooresville 






12 












4 


Mt Vernon 










19 


Pendleton 


198 00 
206 40 

199 12 


4 
6 
5 






9 


Petersburg 


$326 40 


9 


15 


Plymouth 






5 


Richmond 






177 83 


16 


16 




$262 92 
401 44 
593 81 
1,220 08 
786 00 
414 00 


6 
13 

20 
24 
17 
11 






6 


Scottsburg 










13 












20 


Shelbyville 










24 




102 00 


2 






19 


Summitville 






11 


Terre Haute . 


209 36 
591 01 


22 
13 


891 56 


33 


55 


Veedersburg 


875 92 

693 64 

1,118 88 

1,156 20 

58 08 
156 44 
220 95 


22 
21 
31 
19 

2 
4 
4 


35 








21 


Warsaw' 


715 65 


19 






50 


Waterloo . 






19 


Wayne Twp. 

Tippecanoe Co 

West Lafayette 










2 










4 












4 


Winamac • 


585 00 
366 60 


17 

18 






17 




484 17 


13 






31 










Totals 


$26,535 05 


622 


$8,093 72 


222 


$2,536 86 


86 


$37,165 63 


970 











TALBE 17. VOCATIONAL TRANSFER PUPILS, 1920-21— SUMMARY 





No. of 
schools 
having 
transfer 
pupils 


No. of 
transfer 
pupils 
therein 


No. of 
townships 

from which 
pupils are 

transferred 


Reimbursement 


Agriculture 

Home economics 

Industry 


51 

24 

5 


662 

222 
86 


187 • 
79 
22 


$26,535 05 
8,093 72 
2,536 86 


Totals. 


63 


970 


243 


$37,165 63 



TEACHER-TRAINING COURSES, 1920-21 

For teacher-training courses designed to prepare persons to teach 
vocational subjects in agriculture, home economics and industry, reim- 
bursement is granted for a portion of the cost of maintaining such 
courses. 



Department of Public Instruction 

TABLE 18. teacher-training COURSES, 1920-21 



07 



Institution and Type of 
Training 



Indl\na State Normal School— (Total) 

Industry 

Home Economics 

Induna University — (Total) 

Industry . 

Home Economics 

PuRDiTE University — (Total) 

Agriculture 

Industry 

Home Economics 

South Bend Board of Education 

(Total) 

Industry 

Totals 

Industry 

Home Economics 

Agriculture 



Reim- 
bursement 



$3,673 77 
2,441 27 
1,232 50 

7,351 50 
5,766 98 
1,584 52 

11,456 90 

7,386 02 

892 14 

3,178 74 



173 37 
173 37 



$22,655 54 

$9,273 76 
5,995 76 
7,386 02 



Institution 
Funds 



$3,220 41 
1,987 91 
1,232 50 

7,351 54 
5,767 01 
1,584 53 

11,546 93 

7,386 03 

892 14 

3,178 76 



132 79 
132 79 



$22,161 67 

$8,779 85 
5,995 79 
7,386 03 



State Funds 
(State Board) 



$226 69 
226 69 



20 29 
20 29 



$246 

$246 



Federal 
Funds 



$3,447 08 
2,214 58 
1,232 50 

7,351 50 
5,766 98 
1,584 52 

11,456 90 

7,386 02 

892 14 

3,178 74 



153 08 
153 08 



$22,408 56 

$9,026 78 
5,995 76 
7,386 02 



Total Cost 

of 
Maintenance 



$6,894 18 
4,429 18 
2,465 00 

14,703 04 
11,533 99 
3,169 05 

22,913 83 
14,772 05 
1,784 28 
6,357 50 



306 16 
306 16 



$44,817 21 

$18,053 61 
11,991 55 
14.772 05 



HISTORICAL TABLES 

The following tables show receipts and expenditures, number of 
pupils, etc., for each year since the State law on vocational education 
was enacted in 1913. 

TALBE 19. TOTAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



Year ending Sept. 30 


Receipts 


Expenditures 


Surplus 


State 
funds 


Federal 
funds 


Total 


Amount 


Per cent 
increase 


1913 


$3,505 77 
111,406 89 
199,984 63 
201,027 73 
205,902 92 




$3,505 77 
111,406 89 
199,984 63 
201,027 73 
205,902 92 
200,000 18 
166,061 45 
183,790 82 
207,609 32 


$3,505 77 
22,442 76 
62,564 49 
106,716 35 
153,468 31 
181,477 31 
209,177 03 
315,704 70 
396,648 51 




. , 


1914 




540 
178 
70 
44 
18 
15 
50 
25 


$88 964 13 


1915 




226,384 27 


1916 




320,695 65 


1917 




373,130 26 


1918 


155,965 21 


M4.034 97 


391,653 13 


1919 


110,402 29 55.659 16 


348,537 55 


1920 


113,923 63 
115,807 01 


69,867 19 
91,802 31 


216,623 67 


1921 


27,584 48 







TABLE 20. REIMBURSEMENT FOR VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 



Year ending 
Sept. 30 


Industry 


Home economics 


Agriculture 


Total 


Per cent 
increase 


1915 


$11,602 55 
26,239 09 
39,065 23 
57,999 93 
61,137 89 
107,209 99 
125,504 04 


$11,563 20 
15,859 03 
32,053 31 
24,336 69 
19,998 89 
36,377 54 
48,242 96 


$1,729 98 
7,032 89 
14,022 47 
25,740 22 
27,073 62 
49,781 56 
65,949 86 


$24,895 73 
49,131 01 
85,141 01 
108,076 84 
108,210 40 
193,369 09 
239,696 86 




1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 


98 
73 
27 

.1 
80 
23 



7—19930 



98 



Year Book 



TABLE 21. VOCATIONAL TRANSFER PUPILS IN AGRICULTURE, 

INDUSTRY SCHOOLS. 



HOME ECONOMICS AND 





Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Industry 


Total 




1^ 


.S 

1" 


"I 


M 






bO 

II 




3 

a 

I 


■k 

iz; 


iz; 


1 
1 


1915 


2 
2 
7 

13 
20 
26 
51 


21 
17 
71 
119 
234 
390 
662 


$148 00 
350 75 
1,327 11 
2,302 51 
4,908 20 
11,356 56 
26,535 05 














2 
3 
11 
16 
26 
33 
62 


21 

28 
95 
196 
368 
597 
970 


$148 00 


1916 








1 
3 
3 
3 

i 


11 

17 
38 
55 
59 

86 


$313 06 
690 28 
962 22 

1,096 28 
990 41 

2,536 86 


663 81 


1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 


3 
6 
11 
12 

24 


7 

39 

79 

148 

222 


$235 02 

927 82 

1,400 49 

3,400 97 

8,093 72 


*2,252 41 

*4,192 55 

*7,404 97 

*15,747 94 

*37,165 63 



*These amounts are properly chargeable against each of the years specified. They differ slightly from the 
amounts actually paid each year for the reason that a few small items, payable before October 1, were actually 
paid after October 1. The total amounts actually paid, beginning with 1917, were: $2,066 .78; $4,000.43; $7,441.48; 
$15,878.16; $37,376.65. 



TABLE 22. EXPENDITURES FOR TEA.CHER-TRA.INING, STATE OFFICE 
AND COUNTY AGENTS 



Year ending Sept. 30 


Teacher-training 


State office 


County Agents* 


1913 




$3,505 77 
10,428 70 
13,660 48 
25,681 12 
33,193 66 
16,994 26 
16,638 67 
20,679 86 
18,533 60 




1914 




$12,014 06 
23,860 28 
31 240 41 


1915 




1916 




1917 




33,066 86 


1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 


$7,147 59 
11,510 95 
16,278 92 
22,655 54 


45,258 19 
65,375 53 
69,498 67 
78,385 86 



*Although the expenditures for county agents are administered by Purdue University, the amounts are given 
here because they are taken from the tax levy fixed in the law on vocational education. 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 
(In the Division of Vocational Education) 

Work in vocational rehabilitation v^as begun May 1, 1921, under the 
provisions of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Law approved March 
11, 1921. This law extends the privileges of vocational education to 
disabled persons and provides for their return to profitable employment. 

Vocational courses may be arranged for persons who have a physical 
disability which prevents them from following their regular employment. 
The disability may be congenital, or it may be acquired by disease, or 
by accident on farms, in mines, quarries, shops, factories, or otherwise. 
The following classes of persons are eligible for vocational rehabilitation : 

(1) Persons who because of congenital disability have no regular 
occupation. 



Department of Public Instruction 99 

(2) Persons who have been subjects of accidents which prevent 
their return to their former occupations. 

(3) Persons who by reason of disease are disabled to such an 
extent that they are no longer able to follow their regular occupations. 

The applicant must also be of employable age and must give promise 
of being employable after he has completed a course of vocational 
training. 

Vocational training courses are provided free of charge to such 
disabled persons. Training may be secured in schools, factories, shops, 
or by correspondence. All necessary tools, books, and supplies are fur- 
nished free. 

Placement in suitable jobs and furnishing of special mechanical or 
prosthetic appliances for disabled persons are also provided for under 
the law. 

The State Industrial Board very generously opened its files to the 
rehabilitation agents and made it possible to investigate the large num- 
ber of industrial accidents which appear on our records. 

TABLE 1. RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

May 1, 1921, to September 30, 1921 

RECEIPTS 

(1) State funds $11,052 11 

(2) Federal funds, federal year ending June 30, 1921 22,104 22 

(3) Federal funds, federal year ending June 30, 1922 21,577 39 

T^tal $54,733 72 

EXPEDITURES 

(1) State office $2,200 31 

(a) Salary (supervisor) 1,250 00 

(b) Travel 275 15 

(c) Stenographer (% time) ^ 227 50 

(d) Office supplies 337 18 

(e) Office equipment 108 95 

(f^ Communication 1 53 

(2) Tuition 698 68 

(a) Educational institutions 283 37 

(b) Industrial and commercial 255 71 

(c) Correspondence 159 60 

(3) Instructional supplies 93 11 

Total , $2,992 10 

(a) State funds $1,550 54 

(b) Federal funds 1,441 56 

Unexpended balance, federal funds June 30, 1921, reverted to U. S. Treasury 21,577 39 

Grand total $24,569 49 

Balance September 30, 1921 30,164 23 

(a) State funds 9,501 57 

(b) Federal funds 20,662 66 

Total $54,733 72 



100 Year Book 

table 2. status of cases 

Total number of disabled persons reported to Division 528 

(1) Number of persons who have made application 138 

(a) Placed in training 48 

(b) Eligible and awaiting training 17 

(c) Applications awaiting approval 37 

(d) Rejected service 4 

(e) Not susceptible of rehabilitation 4 

(f) Found ineligible and closed for other reasons 28 

(2) Number disabled persons called to the attention of the Division who 
have not made application for the following reasons (these cases 

have been closed) 172 

(a) Found to have negligible handicap 68 

(b) Failed to reply to letters 49 

(c) Could not locate 32 

(d) Service rejected 16 

(e) Not susceptible of rehabilitation 2 

(f) Deceased 5 

(3) Number of persons under investigation who have not made applica- 
tion but to whom one or more letters have been sent 218 

TABLE 3. TYPES OF TRAINING— BY INSTITUTIONS 

No. in Training 

(1) Higher education institutions, college grade 8 

(2) Trade schools, full-time 11 

(3) Commercial schools 8 

(a) Full-time 4 

(b) Part-time , 1 

(c) Evening 3 

(4) Public evening schools (trade subjects) 3 

(5) Employment training (trades) 12 

( 6 ) Correspondence schools > 6 

Total ..48 

TABLE 4. OCCUPATIONS FOR WHICH DISABLED PERSONS ARE BEING 

TRAINED 

Accounting Law 
Auto mechanics Machine operation 
Bookkeeping Monotype operation 
Broom making Oxy-acetylene welding 
Business executive Railway mail service 
Chiropractic Rug and carpet weaving- 
Clerical work Stock clerk 
Commercial illustrating Salesman 
Combustion engineer Steam engineer 
Contracting Toolmaker 
Drafting Teacher 
Electrical power plant operator Traffic management 
Jewelry engraving 

TABLE 5. PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF DISABLED PERSONS NOW IN TRAINING 

Anderson Fort Wayne Linton 

Bedford Hartford City Michigan -City 

Bourbon Indianapolis Muncie 

Brazil Indiana Harbor New Albany 

Evansville Jasonville New Castle 

Farmersburg Kendallville South Bend 

Farmland Lafayette Terre Haute 

Frankfort Laporte 



Department of Public Instruction 101 

TABLE 6. institutions FURNISHING COURSES TO DISABLED PERSONS 
AND COURSES GIVEN BY EACH 

Alexander Hamilton Institute — Correspondence, professional course. 

Board of Industrial Aid for the Blind — Full-time trade course. 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute — Full-time trade course. 

Benjamin Harrison Law School — Evening school professional courses. 

Brazil Business University — Full-time commercial course. 

Central Business College — Full-time, part-time and evening commercial. 

East Chicago Evening School — Evening trade course. 

Evansville Evening School — Evening trade course. 

Georgetown Law School — Full-time professional course. 

Indiana University — Full-time professional course. 

Indianapolis Y. M. C. A. Evening School — Evening school trade courses. 

International Correspondence School— Correspondence, trade course. 

Lockyear's Business College — Full-time commercial course. 

Louisville Y. M. C. A. — Evening trade course. 

Muncie Business College — Evening commercial course. 

Ross College of Chiropractic— Full-time professional course. 

South Bend Business College — Full-time commercial course. 

South Bend Evening School — Evening trade course. 

Sweeney Automobile and Tractor School — Full-time trade course. 

United Y. M. C. A. Correspondence School — Correspondence trade course. 

University of Wisconsin — Correspondence trade course. 

U. T. A. School of Printing — Full-time trade course. 

CO-OPERATING AGENCIES 

Numerous agencies have given valuable assistance to the Rehabilita- 
tion Division in the promotion of its work. In addition to the State 
Industrial Board, already referred to, those deserving special mention 
are (1) The Indianapolis Charity Organization Society; (2) The Board 
of Industrial Aid for the Blind for its facilities in rug and carpet 
weaving and broom making; (3) The state workers with the Social 
Service Department of the Robert W. Long Hospital for bringing worthy 
cases to our attention, and (4) various social service organizations 
throughout the state. 



DIVISION OF SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 



BLANCHE MERRY, State Attendance Officer. 

The division of school attendance was created by the legislature 
of 1921. The Act concerning school attendance and employment of 
minors, was signed by the Governor on May 31, 1921. On June 6 the 
first state attendance officer of Indiana began work. 

The initial step in building the attendance division of the depart- 
ment of public instruction was the establishment of a basic principle. 
No better fundamental could be found than the core of the law itself: 
"Every child between the ages of seven and sixteen years shall attend 
public school, or other school taught in the English language which is 
open to the inspection of local and state attendance and school officers; 
and such child shall attend such school each year during the entire time 
the public schools are in session." With the above as a standard 
the organization began. It was obvious that a new type of attendance 
officer must be secured in order to bring all the children affected by 



102 Year Book 

this law into the schools of the state. The summer was given over to 
qualifying and selecting officers whom we believed would measure well 
with the standard set. 

We were fortunate in securing a group of men and women espe- 
cially adapted to the execution of the law. Among these are approxi- 
mately thirty high school graduates; many who have had college, 
university or normal school training; others with experience in social 
service work; several ministers and a few ex-service men. With this 
splendid corps of workers we have been able to accomplish a great deal 
in the five months given to the execution of the law. 

When school was opened, early in September, the percentage of 
attendance was far in advance of our expectations. The school offi- 
cials were unable to care for the many children brought in through the 
efforts of these officers. Schools had to be re-opened and new schools 
established. In one county in the state the school trustee was forced 
to open a school that he had neglected for the past year. In another 
county, the nucleus of a high school has been made to care for about 
forty elementary school graduates. In a northern county of the State, 
the people are not satisfied with poor schools but demand that their 
children should be given the advantage of a certified high school. 

In our larger cities, many children were forced to re-enter school 
from various kinds of industry. To care for these children, officials 
have arranged special classes, and in some cases special schools, with a 
course of study particularly adapted to their needs. Everywhere the 
ideal of training for American citizenship was kept in mind. 

In other cases the attendance officer sought help from local or- 
ganizations as well as individuals and was able to care for special 
children in the way of books and clothing. In one part of the State, 
through the efforts of the officer and the school trustee, the ladies of 
a church are helping with the duties of a motherless child who has 
younger brothers and sisters. By this co-operation it is possible for 
this girl to have her chance with other children. In one case the at- 
tendance officer found a family in quarantine. When the time for lifting 
the quarantine was due, she went to the home with clothing, soap and 
disinfectants. Two days were given to helping the mother prepare 
her children for school the following week. 

The people are gradually understanding the law. With an under- 
standing of it, there comes co-operation. With a standard of regular 
attendance on the part of every child in the state, our schools must 
necessarily be more economical in money, time and energy. The latter 
applies to both the children and the teacher. 

The attendance law has brought to the surface many perplexing 
problems. A number of these problems are yet unsolved, but school 
officials are diligently at work on more efficient schools. As the work 
advances, the difficulties which have arisen through the execution of 
the attendance law will be solved. A great forward step has been made 
in bringing the children of the state into touch with the educational 
opportunities offered. 

Indiana is responsible for the education of the youth, but she is 
equally responsible in seeing that the youth avail themselves of the ad- 
vantages offered. 



Department of Public Instruction 
DIVISION OF STATISTICS AND ACCOUNTING 



103 



DEFICIENCY SCHOOL FUND 

Report of money received from state school tax and special ap- 
propriation by state legislature for town and township deficiency fuhd, 
and the amount paid to school corporations to enable them to complete 
a six or seven months' term. 

1. Number of corporations submitting requests for state aid 165 

2. Number of corporations given state aid 147 

3. Number of counties given state aid 28 

4. Amount available for distribution from — 

(a) June 1920 settlement $141,209 25 

(b) December 1920 settlement 117,610 79 

(c) Special appropriation by State Legislature, 1921. 

(See p. 262, Acts 1921) 200,000 00— $458,820 04 

5. Total amount distributed to corporations 384,851 66 

6. Balance in treasury September 30, 1921 $73,968 38 

Note. — A number of corporations failed to continue their schools the required time 
for which aid was granted. It was, therefore, necessary to withhold aid for the num- 
ber of days not taught. Furthermore, a number of corporations applying for aid failed 
to qualify, having made their levies too low to entitle them to the amount of state aid 
for which they applied. This accounts for the large balance in the treasury September 
30, 1921. 

DETAILED REPORT DEFICIENCY FUND, 1920-1921 



Township or Town 


Trustee or Treasurer of School Board 


Amount 

Each 

Corporation 

Received 

From 
the State 


Amount 

Each 

County 

Received 


Adams County: 




$1,248 23 






George Wilkerson 




Brown County: 
Hamblen 


$4,283 02 
6,084 30 
2,150 40 
5,047 31 
3,275 47 
6,000 02 


$1,248 23 




Wes Curry 




Johnson 


William Bales 






Albert Hedrick 




Washington 


Bennie Petro 






William L. Coffey 










Clark County: 


$1,989 87 
739 11 


$26,840 52 


Wood . 


F.M. Brock 

E E. Parr 








Crawford County: 

Boone 


$396 45 
1,568 65 
1,328 37 
2,010 51 
2,514 06 
1,043 20 
2,193 31 
1,235 54 

1.037 74 
6,843 73 

6.038 87 
7,181 08 
6,791 10 


$2,728 98 


Jennings 


John M Mcintosh 




Johnson 


Reuben Cox 




Ohio 


J P Rainforth 




Patoka 


Joseph T. Riley 




Sterling 


Chas P Miller 


" 




Chas. E. Ford 




Whisky Run 


Willard Vance 






D. S. Deuchars 




Erglish, town 


Jas A Goodwin 










Marengo, town 


L L Jenner . 






L. E. Flanigan 














i$40,182 61 



104 



, Year Book 

DETAILED REPORT DEFICIENCY FUND, 1920-1921— Continued 



Township or Town 


Trustee or Treasurer of School Board 


Amount 

Each 

Corporation 

Received 

From 
the State 


Amount 

Each 

County 

Received 


Daviess County: 


Walter Smoot 


$1,730 91 
2,348 36 
1,869 27 




Reeve 


Rett A. Roberts . 
















Dearborn County: 

Kelso 


$2,481 11 

1,582 40 

1,030 13 

139 05 


$5,948 54 


Logan . 


James W. Gaynor 












Clyde Randall 








_ 


Dubois County: 

Cass 


$2,117 24 
5,842 56 
1,983 14 
1,262 79 
4,686 34 


$5,232 69 


Columbia . . 


Amos Bledsoe and Chas. Seneff 




Hall 




Jefferson . 


Herman Cummins 






P. J, Hollowell 






Chas. Wheaton 




Gibson County: 

Barton 


$8/4 18 


$15,892 07 




Oliver Brewer 




Greene County: 
Cass 


$616 57 
3,872 02 
2,552 30 
6,395 72 
3,654 89 


$874 18 


Center 


William C. Hord 

Jas.W. Fuller •. 

Jonas Hayes . ... 




Beech Creek 




Jackson 




Taylor 


Jason Huffman 

Ade Stevens 








Harrison County: 

Blue River .... 


$5,292 42 
5,603 38 
3,818 86 
6,091 07 
4,344 53 
1,930 23 
4,943 39 
1,715 18 
2,621 49 
2,238 13 
3,924 26 
2,876 43 


$17,091 50 




T^tie Robey 




Harrison 


Dan F Stauth 




Heth 


Wm H. Neeley 




Jackson 


Ed Sappenfield 






W E Diedrich . ... 




Posey 


Wm W Weaver 




Scott 


C D. Mauck 




Spencer 


W E Nolot 




Taylor 


Andrew Anchutz 




Washington 


Harry E Trotter 




Webster 


John H Wolfe, Jr 






Wm. H. Russell 




Jackson County: 

Grassv Fork 


$1,208 07 
5,433 87 
5,100 21 
5,225 70 
5,805 34 


$45,399 37 


Owen . 


Elsworth Brown 






Wm. T. McKain 




Salt Creek 


Theodore Davis 






Howard R. Rider 






W. A. Hord 




Jefferson County: 


$892 02 

2,004 24 

2,179 46 

3,051 87 

904 08 


$22,773 19 


Hanover 


Ben H. Banta 






C. L. Rutledge 




Saluda 


Robt A. J. McKeand 




Shelby 








T H Schlottman 




Jennings County: 

Bigger . .... 


$3,179 49 
2,240 89 
2,861 75 
2,537 30 
2,446 35 
2,664 64 
2,877 97 
4,143 07 
2,817 97 


$9,031 67 


Campbell 


J. E. Rine 




Columbia . . . 


Henry Pearcy 






John T. Richardson 




Lovett . . ... 


Wm R McClellan 






A. L. Kysar 




Montgomery 


D W Matthews 




Sand Creek 






Spencer . 


John B. Haley 














$25,769 43 



Department of Public Instruction 105 

DETAILED REPORT DEFICIENCY FUND, 1920-1921— (Jontinuel 



Township or Town 


Trustee or Treasurer of School Board 


Amount 

Each 

(corporation 

Received 

From 
the State 


Amount 

Each 
County 
Received 


Lawrence County: * 
Bono 


John P. Wicker 


$1,202 30 

519 36 

2,085 05 

693 46 

1,498 68 

3,905 12 




Guthrie . 


Chas. M. Henderson 






John R. Smith 




Perry 


Ellis Spoonmore 




Pleasant Run , 






Spice Valley 


J. W. Wilson 






Wm. L. Dunlap . . 




Martin County: 

Center 


$532 63 
1,456 36 
1,497 12 


$9,903 97 


Halbert 






Shoals, town . 


Wm. Sides 






Dill Hughes . ... 




Monroe County: 

Bean Blossom 


$5,026 34 
815 50 

3,412 52 
724 35 
501 05 

2,098 71 
385 10 

1.177 37 

1,285 52 


$3,486 11 




Michael Chitwood 




Clear Creek 


JohnP Harrell 










Marion . 


Conner Hacker 




Polk 


William Hedrick 




Richland 


J M. Rice 




Salt Creek 


Robert Rayl 




Washihgton 


Turner Wiley 






Lynden B. Roberts 

Chas. H. Denbo 




Orange County: 

Greenfield 


$1,456 39 
3,194 93 
1,381 12 
1,130 92 
3,984 54 
2,565 93 
1,314 24 


$15,426 46 






Northwest 


John D Toliver 










South East . 


Edward B Vance 










Paoli town . . 


Arthur J Farlow 






John S Brown 




Owen County: 

Clay 


$1,874 25 

142 27 

598 17 

2,490 42 

553 47 

351 49 

352 59 
2,006 86 


$14,028 07 








Jackson . 


Bruce Davis 






E. F. Bush 




Jennings . .... 


A M. Huffman 




Lafayette 


John White 




Morgan . 


J E Halton 




Taylor 


A. G. Acord 






E. A. Webster 




Parke County: 


$974 13 


$8,369 52 








Perry County: 


$4,269 76 
9,566 56 
8,417 58 
5,824 56 
5,262 98 
4,967 82 
2,283 03 


$974 13 


Clark . . . 


John M. Arehart 

D. 0. Harding 




Tobin 




Union . . . .■ 


John Baysinger 










Oil ■::::::::■:■:■:■■■::;;;;:;: 


J. E. Hubert '. . 












Jas H Borders 




Pike County: 
Clay . . 


$1,964 69 
4,657 56 
2,932 68 
3,727 61 


$40,592 29 


Lockhart 


I. N. Barrett 




Marion 


Samuel Pipes. 




Monroe 


Reece Burns 






Ed. D. Casey 




Scott County: 


$1,576 61 


$13,282 54 












$1,576 61. 



106 



Year Book 

DETAILED REPORT DEFICIENCY FUND, 1920-1921— Continued 



Township or Town 


Trustee or Treasurer of School Board 


Amount 

Each 

Corporation 

Received 

From 
the State 


Amount 

Each 
County 
Received 


Spencer County: 

Carter . . . 


Fred B. Bockstahler 


$3,250 24 
861 91 
2,629 62 
1,089 88 
3,337 09 
1,534 21 




Clay 






Jackson . . 


G. W. Harris 






John C. Clement 




Chrisney, town . . 


Chas. Franzman 










a' 

Sullivan County: 


E. A. Marratta . . . ■ 




$2,303 17 
1,981 61 


$12,702 95 


Jefferson 


John W. Buck 






Eugene Stoops . . 




Switzerland County: 

Cotton 


$1,082 23 
462 30 
662 16 


$4,284 78 


Craig 


A. K. Smith 




York 


Philip Markland 










Vigo County: 

West Terre Haute, town 


$2,317 00 


$2,206 69 








Warrick County: 


$1,909 64 
943 31 
5,021 05 
1,223 54 
5,716 38 
5,755 87 
5,177 98 
792 47 


$2,317 00 


Greer 


Samuel Thene 




Hart 


Jas. H. Ricketts 

Chas. W. Dougan 




Lane 




Owen 


Henry T. Leslie 




Pigeon 


0. E. Evans 




Skelton 






Newburg, town 


Ernest Purdue 






L. B. Ashabraner 




Washington County: 
Franklin 


$1,346 42 
1,025 74 

367 05 

117 50 
1,451 77 

721 56 
1,810 54 
1,164 96 
1,408 95 

732 83 


$26,540 24 




Nestle H. Voyles 




Jackson 


Oliver S. Bush 






C. E. Patton 

John Ryan 




Monroe 






D.W. Still 




Campbellsburg, town 


Jas. C. Wade 






Wm. A. Hulgan 




New Pekin, town 


Homer Lewis 




Saltillo, town 
















$10,147 32 


$384,851 66 











APPORTIONMENT OF COMMON SCHOOL REVENUE FOR TUITION 
Made by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction on January 3, 1921 

Showing the enumeration of children in each county, the amount 
of school revenue ready for apportionment in each county and the 
source from which the same is derived, the total amount of school 
revenue* for distribution, and the distributive shares thereof apportioned 
to each county, as required by Sections 6433, 6465, 6470, 6471 and 6474, 
Revised Statutes 1914, and Acts of 1915, page 633. 



Department of Public Instruction 



107 



SUMMARY 

Balance in treasury after June, 1920, apportionment $418 45 

Balance from Deficiency Fund, September 30, 1920 1 ,2.'j8 78 

Town and Township Deficiency Fund set aside in June, 1920 141,209 25 

State school tax— December, 1920, settlement 1 ,434,277 '.)'.', 

Common School Fund interest^ — ^December, 1920, settlement :'ii:},314 16 

Unclaimed fees ^ 1,182 07 

Manuscript fees 2,684 21 

Show licenses 4,133 50 

$1,898,478 35 
Town and Township Deficiency Fund Set Aside — 

From June, 1920, settlement $141,209 25 

From December, 1920, settlement 117,610 79— 258,820 04 

Total available for distribution $1,639,658 31 

Amount apportioned $1,639,458 70 

Balance in treasury 199 61— 1,639,658 31 

Number of children enumerated 784,430 

Per capita $2 09 



APPORTIONMENT FOR JANUARY, 1921 



COUNTIES 


Number of 

Childern 

Enumerated 

Between 6 

and 21 Years 

of Age 


Amount 
Derived 

from 
State Tax 


Interest 
Collected on 

Common 

School Fund 

Since Last 

Apportionment 


Amount 
Apportioned 
at $2.09 Per 

Capita 


Adams 


6,356 
28,925 
6,432 
3,281 
4,259 

5,932 
2,199 
4,234 
8,694 
8,367 

9,708 
6,970 
3,148 
8,231 
5,351 

4,906 
6,461 

16,622 
6,333 

13,938 

4,313 
8,970 
4,971 
4,076 
4,499 

8,480 
14,701 
11,038 
5,876 
4,128 

5,476 
5,100 
9,612 
10,213 
8.377 


$12,579 64 

56,778 52 

13,581 64 

16,918 24 

7,728 75 

17,413 69 

1,167 01 

13,099 19 

20,393 15 

8,041 71 

9,019 16 
21,139 47 
1,692 35 
9,095 44 
6,124 77 

10,853 92 
12,284 00 
27,516 22 
- 4,691 39 
24,573 87 

8,391 09 
5,446 87 

11,835 69 
6,139 98 

10,360 70 

12,765 20 
24,454 92 
10,377 53 
14,343 77 
13,643 49 

3,399 17 
15,263 46 
18,374 25 
22,668 10 
16,348 00 


$2,210 94 
9,214 39 
2,981 45 
1,721 53 
1,997 80 

2,665 96 
1,158 34 
2,095 45 
3,984 89 
3,423 81 

2,706 96 
3,801 81 
1.507 09 
9,270 52 
3,119 22 

2,916 72 
2,718 28 
4,703 28 
2,474 18 
5,715 08 

1,464 80 
3,285 50 
2,916 54 
859 53 
1,832 22 

3,548 64 
6,407 05 
6,166 01 
3,145 64 
3,000 09 

3,427 05 
3,819 57 
5,545 90 
3.425 64 
3,197 27 


$13,284 04 


Allen 


60,453 25 


Bartholomew 


13,442 88 




6,857 29 


Blackford 


8,901 31 


Boone 


12,397 88 
4,595 91 


Carroll . . 


8,849 06 


Cass 


18,170 46 


Clark ......... 


17,487 03 


Clay 


20,289 72 


Clinton 


14,567 30 


Crawford 


6,579 32 




17,202 79 


Dearborn 


11,183 59 


Decatur 

Dekalb 


10,253 54 
13,503 49 


Delaware . . 


34,739 98 




13,235 97 


Elkhart 


29,130 42 


Fayette . 


9,014 17 


Floyd 


18,747 30 


Fountain . 


10,389 39 


Franklin . , 


8,518 84 


Fulton 


9,402 91 


Gibson 


17,723 20 


Grant 


30,725 09 


Greene . 


23.069 42 




12.280 S4 


Hancock 


8,627 52 




11,444 84 


Hendricks 


10,659 00 




20,0S9 OS 


Howard 


, 21,345 17 


Huntington 


1 17,507 93 



108 



Year Book 

APPORTIONMENT FOR JANUARY, 1921— Continued 



COUNTIES 


Number of 

Childern 

Enumerated 

Between 6 

and 21 Years 

of Age 


Amount 
Derived 

from 
State Tax 


Interest 
Collected on 

Common 

School Fund 

Since Last 

Apportionment 


Amount 
Apportioned 
at $2.09 Per 

Capita 


Jackson 


7,017 
3,925 
6,512 
5,080 
3,909 

5,053 
13,769 

6,913 

3,724 
42,448 

14,888 

8,893 
21,368 
79,788 

6,454 

3,667 
6,942 
7,731 
7,233 
5,465 

2,947 
5,551 
922 
4,653 
3,668 

5,142 
5,050 
5,634 
5,519 
5,390 

3,728 
5,206 
7,222 
5,604 
4,492 

2,471 
6,554 
5,510 
3,345 
3,369 

27,932 / 

9,203 

2,323 
10,641 

4,355 

1,449 
24,659 

8,383 
26,975 

6,933 
2,507 
6,034 
4,519 

10,905 
5,774 
4,656 
4,249 


$9,374 44 
10,157 78 
12,625 44 
5,441 96 
4,589 68 

14,242 28 
20,428 55 
16,019 17 
8,405 85 
76,598 43 

23,564 60 

7,036 57 

26,692 46 

182,000 40 

15,006 20 

2,309 91 
15,562 18 

6,696 21 
19,449 23 

8,003 16 

10,749 69 

12,161 12 

1,234 98 

4,297 38 

4,538 35 

8,447 21 
2,695 67 
4,894 59 
14,892 82 
9,727 44 

7,952 31 
11,844 22 
19,191 10 

5,793 22 
17,508 61 

2,616 97 

18.507 32 
5,205 67 
6,482 67 
5,931 98 

51,298 21 
12,008 27 
2,210 67 
25,729 19 
12,338 43 

4,723 15 
33,766 31 
11,119 77 
34,083 79 

15,545 78 
11,093 09 
5,670 60 
5,437 29 

23,951 44 
13,099 34 

13.508 58 
11,301 85 


$3,123 53 
1,493 13 
2,124 44 
3,304 87 
1,389 27 

2,816 40 
6,144 81 
4,072 82 
1,881 20 
10,708 35 

4,313 69 
2,859 24 
4,616 91 
16,808 43 

2.628 11 

4,735 45 
3,990 57 
2,577 78 
2,196 77 
2,004 02 

1,134 84 
2,605 07 
774 69 
2,357 18 
2,295 99 

3,470 42 
2,148 79 
2,780 40 
2,212 23 
3,720 43 

1,106 23 
1,800 97 
4,271 44 
1,682 10 
2,270 88 

1,840 64 
2,856 96 

2.629 76 
1,870 19 
3,173 76 

4,484 01 
3,412 68 
788 56 
3,782 11 
2,959 33 

728 66 
7,084 11 
3,045 22 
7,374 64 

4,562 33 
1,429 82 
3,028 60 
1,996 62 

6,217 80 
5,049 73 
1,723 54 
2,424 49 


$14 665 53 


Jasper 


8,203 25 




13,610 08 




10,617 20 




8,169 81 


Tr>lm«!nn . ... 


10 560 77 


J^jjOX 


28,777 21 




14 448 17 




7,783 16 


Lake 


88,716 32 


Laporte 


31,115 9 2 




18,586 37 


Mnrlisnn 


44,659 12 




166,756 92 


Marshall " 


13,488 86 




7,664 03 




14,508 78 


Monroe 


16,157 79 




15,116 97 




11,421 85 


Newton 


6,159 2 3 


Noble 


11,601 59 


Ohio 


1,926 98 




9,724 77 




7,666 12 


Parke 


10,746 78 


Perry 


10,554 50 


Pike 


11,775 06 


Porter 


11,534 71 




11,205 10 


Pulaski 


7,791 52 




10,880 54 


Randoloh . . 


15,093 98 


Ripley 


11,712 36 


Rush 


9,388 28 


Scott. 


5,164 39 


Shelby 


13,697 86 




11,515 90 


Starke 


6,991 05 


Steuben . . 


7,041 21 


St Joseoh 


58,377 88 




19,234 27 


Swnt.zprlnnd . 


4,855 07 




22,239 69 


Tipton 


9,101 95 




3,028 41 




51,537 31 


Vermillion 


17,520 47 


Viao 


56,377 75 


Wabash 


14,489 97 




5,239 63 


Warrick 


12,611 06 


Washington 


9,444 71 


Wayne 


22,791 45 


Wells 


12,067 66 


White 


9,731 04 


Whitley 


8,880 41 






Totals 


784,430 


$1,434,277 93 


$313,314 16 


$1,639,458 70 







Department of Public Instruction 



109 



APPORTIONMENT FOR JUNE, 1921 

SUMMARY 

Balance in treasury after January, 1921, apportionment 

Balance from Deficiency Fund set aside from June and December, 

1921, settlements 

State school tax — June, 1921, settlement 

Common School Fund interest — Aine, 1921, settlement 

Unclaimed fees 

Show licenses 



$199 61 

19,698 82 

1.835,666 74 

302,707 37 

1,209 73 

1,830 00 

$2,159,312 27 



Town and Township Deficiency Fund Set Aside — 

8.2% of state school tax from June, 1921, settlement.. $150,360 67 
Supplemental aid from state school tax — ^June, 1921, 

settlement. (See Chap. 107, Acts of 1921) 200,000 00 

Balance from amount set aside from June and Decem- 
ber, 1920, settlements 19,698 82— 370,058 49 

Total available for distribution $1,789,252 78 

Amount apportioned ; $1,788,875 49 

Balance in treasury 377 29— 1,789,252 78 

Number of children enumerated 797,537 

Per capita $2,243 



DISTRIBUTION OF APPORTIONMENT BY COUNTIES 



COUNTIES 



Number of 

Children 

Between 

6 and 21 

Years of Age 



Amount 

Received 

from State 

School 

Tax 



Interest 
Collected on 

Common 

School Fund 

Since Last 

Apportionment 



Amount 

Derived 

from 

Unclaimed 

Fees and 

Other Sources 



Amount 

Apportioned 

at $2,243 

Per 
Capita 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford . . . 

DaAdess 

Dearborn . . . 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware . . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain... . 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton . . . 
Hancock. . . . 

Harrison. . . . 
Hendricks. . . 

Henry , 

Howard 

Huntington . 



6,466 
29,464 
6,541 
3,264 
4,218 

5,947 
2,148 
4,243 
9,108 
8,358 

9,651 
7,226 
3,215 
8,216 
5,355 

4,979 
6,501 

16,471 
6,294 

14,138 

4,030 
9,027 
4,909 
4,216 
4,543 

8,671 
14,743 
11,063 
6,310 
4,229 

5,425 
5,067 
9,174 
10,761 

8,277 



$16,094 34 
69,971 05 
16,069 02 
21,429 66 

9.054 57 

21,866 86 
1,422 86 
16,195 47 
24,321 92 
10,254 81 

11,275 54 
24,671 99 

2.055 90 
11,275 85 

8,219 28 

13,199 25 
17,190 48 
35,369 44 
6,637 96 
37,100 42 

10,757 25 
8,235 42 

15,260 28 
7,546 18 

13,381 37 

18,086 21 
29,142 56 
14,662 06 
17,088 10 
17,422 60 

4,099 01 
17,891 66 
21,618 45 
29,336 78 
21,374 24 



$2,211 84 

10,040 80 

2,973 66 

1,700 06 

2,000 00 

3,832 79 
1,500 00 
2,080 17 
3,893 21 
3,423 80 

4,242 54 
3,757 11 
1,507 09 
5,000 00 
3,123 23 

2,882 93 
2,588 30 
4,774 47 
2,449 91 
5,039 30 

1,459 85 
3,318 88 
2,938 61 
3,783 39 
1,806 78 

3,563 75 
6,268 05 
6,000 00 
3,138 47 
4,000 00 

3,500 00 
3,825 23 
2,681 46 
3,413 38 
3,219 44 



83 61 



86 04 



$14,503 24 

66,087 75 

14,671 46 

7,321 15 

9,460 97 

13,339 12 
4,817 97 
9,517 05 
20,429 24 
18,746 99 

21,647 19 
16,207 92 
7,211 25 
18,428 49 
12,011 27 

11.167 90 
14,581 74 
36,944 45 
14,117 44 
31,711 53 

9,039 29 
20,247 56 
11,010 89 

9,456 49 
10,189 95 

19,449 05 
33,068 55 
24,814 31 
13,749 59 
9,485 65 

12.168 28 
11.365 28 
20,577 28 
24,136 92 
18,565 31 



110 Year Book 

DISTRIBUTION OF APPORTIONMENT BY COUNTIES— Continued 



COUNTIES 



Number of 

Children 

Between 

6 and 21 

Years of Age 



Amount 

Received 

from State 

School 

Tax 



Interest 
Collected on 

Common 

School Fund 

Since Last 

Apportionment 



Amount 

Derived 

from 

Unclaimed 

Fees and 

Other Sources 



Amount 

Apportioned 

at $2,243 

Per 
Capita 



Jackson. . 
Jasper . . . 
Jay. . . . > 
Jefferson. 
Jennings . 



Johnson. . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko. 
Lagrange. . 
Lake 



Laporte. . . 
Lawrence . 
Madison . , 
Marion . . 
Marshall. 



Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery . 
Morgan 



Newton. 
Noble.. 
Ohio. . . . 
Orange . 
Owen. . . 



Parke. . 
Perry. . 
Pike. . . 
Porter . 
Posey . 



Pulaski . . . 
Putnam. . . 
Randolph . 

Ripley 

Rush 



Scott... 
Shelby. . 
Spencer. 
Starke. . 
Steuben. 



St. 

Sullivan. 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe. 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh . 
Vermillion. . . 
Vigo 



Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington . 



Wayne. . 
Wells. . . 
White.. 
Whitley. 



6,939 
3,980 
6,504 
5,098 
3,832 

5,101 
14,064 
7,239 
3,685 
45,949 

15,107 

8,990 

21,213 

82,947 
6,581 

3,643 
7,111 
8,030 
7,323 

5,388 

2,900 
5,610 
914 
4,722 
3,530 

5,248 
5,025 
5,818 
5,753 
5,351 

3,745 
5,172 
7,183 
5,514 
4,672 

2,254 
6,404 
5,493 
3,348 
3,356 

29,238 
9,184 
2,338 

10,777 
4,355 

1,438 
25,033 

8,567 
27,349 

7,140 
2,428 
5,984 
4,685 

11,566 
5,798 
4,602 
4,251 



Jll,514 07 
13,594 37 
15,748 60 
6,587 52 
5,766 42 

15,844 63 
25,117 73 
20,604 38 
10,449 91 
132,316 67 

31,996 80 

8,502 85 

37,222 07 

215,079 46 

17,461 72 

2,833 77 
18,357 05 

8,374 20 
23,729 23 

9,294 19 

14,065 00 
17,543 10 
1,460 91 
5,497 00 
5,590 35 

10,294 26 
4,025 89 
6,527 70 
20,045 13 
12,489 66 

9,578 17 
14,385 54 
21,264 82 

7,341 48 
20,546 01 

3,032 95 
21,972 83 
6,871 25 
9,109 92 
9,046 85 



14,625 32 

2,781 51 

33,560 07 

14,559 34 

5,708 03 
44,538 59 
15,159 18 
43,060 05 

20,112 70 
14,024 94 
7,136 90 
6,247 71 

27,996 58 
16,227 17 
17,469 48 
12,826 23 



13,000 00 
1,542 16 
2,464 18 
4,187 38 
2,006 19 

2,816 17 
6,253 67 
4,028 40 
1,869 74 
5,418 00 

2,727 43 
3,174 93 
4,585 58 
7,579 62 
2,750 66 

3,000 00 
3,891 56 
2,594 05 
2,187 61 
2,681 50 

1,134 84 
2,915 66 
578 02 
2,638 72 
2,698 25 

3,472 26 
2,170 16 
2,796 43 

2.587 59 
3,741 12 

1,095 98 
4,132 68 
4,256 09 
2,487 06 
3,737 12 

732 25 

4.588 67 
2,616 22 
1,886 14 
1,000 00 

6,417 73 
3,673 60 
2,267 60 
6,370 62 
3,167 19 

813 00 
7,311 33 
3,082 37 
7,374 64 

4,500 00 
1,700 00 
3,000 00 
2,243 31 

5,256 60 



1,700 00 
1,866 83 



$136 25 



57 .30 



78 28 



129 35 




154 55 



30 30 



26 85 



$15,564 18 
8,927 14 
14,588 47 
11,434 81 
8,595 18 

11,441 54 
31,455 55 
16,237 08 
8,265 46 
103,063 61 

33,885 00 
20,164 57 
47,580 76 
186,050 12 
14,761 18 

8,171 25 
15,949 97 
18,011 29 
16,425 49 
12,085 28 

6,504 70 
12,583 23 

2,050 10 
10,591 45 

7,917 79 

11,771 26 
11,271 08 
13,049 77 
12,903 98 
12,002 29 

8,400 04 
11,600 80 
16,111 47 
12,367 90 
10,479 30 

5,055 72 
14,364 17 
12,320 80 
7,509 56 
7.527 51 

65,580 83 
20,599 71 

5,244 14 
24,172 81 

9,768 27 

3,225 43 
56,149 02 
19,215 78 
61,343 81 

16,015 02 
5,446 00 
13.422 11 
10,508 46 

25,942 54 
13,004 91 
10,322 29 
9,534 99 



Totals. 



797,537 



$l,833,e 



74 



$302,707 37 



$872 



$1,788,875 49 



Department of Public Instruction 111 



ENUMERATION OF SCHOOL CHILDREN, 1921 

4 

(6 to 21 years of age) 

White males 400,812 

Colored males 10,319 

Total males 411,131 

White females 376, 192 

Colored females 10,214 

Total females 386,406 

Total males and females 797,537 

White males 400,812 

White females 376, 192 



Total white children 777,004 

Colored males 10,319 

Colored females 10,214 



Total colored children 20,533 

Total enumeration (6 to 21 years of age) 797 , 537 

Total enumeration in 1921 797,537 

Total enumeration in 1920 784,430 



Net gain 13, 107 

Total enumeration in townships in 1921 374,874 

Total enumeration in townships in 1920 369, 945 



Gain in 1921 T 4,929 

Total enumeration in towns in 1921 39 , 194 

Total enumeration in towns in 1920 38,225 



Gain in 1921 969 

Total enimieration in cities in 1921 383 ,469 

Total enumeration in cities in 1920 376,260 



Gain in 1921 7,209 

Total Enumeration in 1920: Total Enumeration in 1921: 

1. In townships 369 , 945 In townships 374 , 874 

2. In towns 38,225 In towns 39, 194 

3. In cities 376,260 In cities 383,469 

Total 784,430 Total 797,537 

Gain 13,107 



112 



Year Book 



COMMON SCHOOL FUND 1921 
Interest Computed from November 1, 1920 to November 1, 1921 



COUNTIES 


Amount held 
in trust by Co. 
June 30, 1921 


Interest from 
Nov. 1, 1920 to 
Nov. 1, 1921 


Interest paid 

in June, 1921 

settlement 


Interest due 

in Dec. 1921 

settlement 


Adams . . 


$73,727 94 

328,626 77 

100,019 77 

56,668 53 

66,797 71 

114,193 68 
44,515 71 
69,593 68 
132,716 25 
114,984 31 

118,231 31 
125,237 07 
50,236 30 
250,128 57 
104,107 67 

96,895 54 
93,861 49 

162,798 72 
81,939 85 

170,754 07 

51,426 73 
112,670 82 
97,953 73 
85,451 52 
60,508 82 

119,050 55 

211.670 24 
198,853 51 
106,279 08 

84,006 29 

115.671 91 
128,100 63 
135,949 98 
115,936 44 
107,314 97 

103,961 81 
51,760 54 
98,979 04 

120,302 89 
66,102 60 

96,281 87 
208,853 88 
135,056 01 

62,423 65 
307,270 72 

142,460 24 
108,340 19 
152,852 66 
464,858 10 
92,240 55 

129,169 21 
131,225 43 
85,600 65 
74,884 04 
95,114 48 

37,638 96 
98,751 70 
21,578 10 
61,214 33 
76,276 17 


$4,423 68 
19,717 61 
6,001 19 
3,400 11 
4,007 86 

6,851 62 
2,670 94 
4,175 62 
7,962 98 
6,899 06 

7,093 88 
7,514 22 
3,014 18 
15,007 72 
6,246 46 

5,813 73 
5,631 69 
9,767 92 
4,916 39 
10,245 25 

3,085 60 
6,760 25 
5,877 22 
5,127 09 
3,630 53 

7,143 03 
12,700 22 
11,931 21 
6,376 74 
5,040 38 

6,940 31 
7,686 04 
8,157^00 
6,956 19 
6,438 90 

6,237 71 
3,105 63 
5,938 74 
7,218 17 
3,966 16 

5,776 91 
12,531 23 
8,103 36 
3,745 42 
18,436 24 

8,547 61 
6,500 41 
9,171 16 
27,891 49 
5,534 43 

7,750 15 

7,873 53 
5,136 04 
4,493 04 
5,706 87 

2,258 34 
5,925 10 
1,294 69 
3,672 86 
4,576 57 


$2,211 84 

10,040 80 

2,973 66 

1,700 06 

2,000 00 

3,832 79 
1,500 00 
2,080 17 
3,893 21 
3,423 80 

4,242 54 
3,757 11 
1,507 09 
5,000 00 
3,123 23 

2,882 93 
2,588 30 
4,774 47 
2,449 91 
5,039 30 

1,459 85 
3,318 88 
2,938 61 
3,783 39 
1,806 78 

3,563 75 
6,268 05 
6,000 00 
3,138 47 
4,000 00 

3,500 00 
3,825 23 
2,681 46 
3,413 38 
3,219 44 

3,000 00 
1,542 16 
2,464 18 
4,187 38 
2,006 19 

2,816 17 
6,253 67 
4,028 40 
1,869 74 
5,418 00 

2,727 34 
3,174 93 
4,585 58 
7,579 62 
2,750 66 

3,000 00 
3,891 56 
2,594 05 

2,187 61 
2,681 50 

1,134 84 
2,915 66 
578 02 
2,638 72 
2,698 25 


$2,211 84 


Allen 


9,676 81 


Bartholomew 


3 027 53 




1,700 05 


Blackford 


2,007 86 


Boone . . . . 


3,018 83 




1,170 94 


Carroll 


2,095 45 


Cass 


4,069 77 


Clark . 


3,475 26 


Clay 


2,851 34 


Clinton 


3 757 11 


Crawford 


1,507 09 


Daviess 


10,007 72 




3,123 23 




2,930 80 


Dekalb . . 


3,043 39 




4,993 45 


Dubois . 


2,466 48 


Elkhart 


5,205 95 


Fayette ... 


1 625 75 


Floyd . . 


3,441 37 




2,938 61 


Franklin . . 


1,343 70 


Fulton 


1,823 75 




3,579 28 


Grant 


6,432 17 




5,931 21 


Hamilton 


3,238 27 




1,040 38 


Harrison . . 


3,440 31 




3,860 81 


Henry 


5,475 54 




3,542 81 


Huntington 


3,219 46 


Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings 


3,237 71 
1,563 47 
3,474 56 
3,030 79 
1,959 97 


Johnson ..... . . ... 


2,960 74 




6,277 56 


Kosciusko 


4,074 96 
1,875 68 


Lake . . 


13,018 24 


Laporte .... 


5,820 27 




3,325 48 


Madison ..... 


4,585 58 




20,311 87 


Marshall . . . .. .. 


2,783 77 


Martin 


4,750 15 


Miami i- 

Monroe 


3,981 97 
2,541 99 




2,305 43 


Morgan 


3,026 37 
1,123 50 


Noble ... 


3,009 44 


Ohio 


716 67 


Orange 


1,034 14 


Owen 


1.878 32 



Department of Public Instruction 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND 1921— Continued 



113 



COUNTIES 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph .... 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . . . 
Tippecanoe . . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh. . 
Vermillion .... 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. . . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Totals 



Amount held 
in trust by Co. 
June 30, 1921 



$115,742 08 
72,400 69 
93,214 32 
76,127 70 
124,705 54 

.36,738 81 
105,337 50 
142,025 66 
82,902 10 
98,871 06 

41,549 53 
125,949 63 
88,270 88 
62,871 22 
61,076 63 

199,753 33 
121,190 77 

55,427 36 
175,300 26 

97,138 18 

27,498 61 

243.710 91 
106,194 71 
240,383 35 

151,742 41 
52,717 75 
93,231 81 
81,509 27 

201.711 74 
92,733 29 
57,023 64 
69,880 16 



$10,505,008 



Interest from 
Nov. 1,1920 to 
Nov. 1, 1921 



.■$6,944 52 

4,. 344 05 

5.592 86 
4,567 
7,482 .33 

2,204 33 

6,. 320 25 

8,521 54 

4,974 13 

5,9.32 26 

2,492 97 
7,556 98 
5,296 25 
3,772 27 
3,664 60 

11,985 20 
7,271 45 
3,325 64 

10,518 02 
5,828 29 

1,649 92 
14,622 65 

6,371 68 
14,423 00 

9,104 54 
3,163 06 

5.593 91 
4,890 56 

12,102 70 
5,564 00 
3,421 42 
4,192 81 



$630,300 53 



Interest paid 

in June, 1921 

settlement 



$3,472 26 
2,170 16 
2,796 43 
2.. 587 59 
3,741 17 

1,095 98 
4,132 68 
4,2.56 09 
2,487 06 
3,737 12 

732 25 
4,588 67 
2,616 22 
1,886 14 
1,000 00 

6,417 73 
3,673 60 
2,261 60 
6,370 62 
3,167 19 

813 00 

7,311 33 

3,082 37 

7,374 64 

4,500 00 
1,700 00 
3,000 00 
2,243 31 

5,256 60 



1,700 00 
1,866 83 



$302,707 37 



Interest due 
in Dec. 1921 
Wittiement 



?3,472 26 
2,173 89 
2,796 43 
1,980 07 
3,741 16 

1,108 35 
2,187 .57 
4,2.56 45 
2,487 07 
2,195 14 

1,760 72 
2,968 31 
2,680 03 
1,886 13 
2,664 60 

5,567 47 
3,597 85 
1,058 04 
4,147 40 
2,661 10 

836 92 
7,311 32 
3,289 31 
7,048 36 

4,604 54 
1,463 06 
2,593 91 
2,642 25 

6,846 10 
5,564 00 
1,721 42 
2,325 98 



$327,593 



8—19930 



114 



Year Book 



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co(M»Oi-ii:^ rt <r<i O <M 00 
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i^lll 



Department of Public Instruction 



115 



Ocoosint^ iftTtiirscOOO CD ■* (M o o 

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O CO 00 Tfi lO o: 

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CO »0 CO CO CO >— I CO 00 o t>- 

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116 



Year Book 





a 


791 91 
100 94 
112 53 
931 66 
619 61 


658 59 
765 51 
459 31 

539 17 

540 47 


746 21 
147 15 
047 08 
703 68 


265 93 
080 70 
999 25 
951 35 


516 34 
899 12 
039 27 
644 04 


CO 




$130 
358 
193 
181 
321 


2,600 

-426 

75 

832 

310 


109 
1,146 

542 
1,780 


i*<COCM^ 


05 CO CO CO 


>o 




Total Amount 

paid from 

Special 

School Fund 


181 51 
839 91 
734 52 
900 29 
622 08 


121 43 
143 79 
538 09 
829 66 

744 75 


036 69 
419 20 
025 41 
194 91 


650 63 
965 24 
001 46 
169 93 


515 54 

248 12 
422 26 
408 94 


00 

>o 

o> 




CO CO CO if CO 
t-lOlOOSOJ 


1,624 

224 

33 

449 

189 


00 00 ■* 03 


■* CO 03 CM 

^t^ooco 


i*'T-lOCD 


"o" 




Total Amount 

paid from 

Tuition 

Fund 


610 40 
261 03 
378 01 
031 37 
997 53 


537 16 
621 72 
921 22 
709 51 
795 72 


709 52 
727 95 
021 67 
508 77 


615 30 
115 46 

997 79 

781 42 


000 80 
651 00 
617 01 
235 10 


i 




Tf-HOI^ If 


il^iS 


^§§i 


COOiOCM 


O CD lO O 


i 




Total Amount 

paid for 

Permanent 

Improvements 


683 52 
205 94 
094 24 
486 84 
163 30 


037 65 
351 30 
116 77 
732 01 
622 26 , 


186 73 
765 82 
307 02 
123 29 


158 64 
718 54 
932 16 
524 44 


032 81 
987 33 
275 65 
624 72 


o 

CM 




t-r-cqoocD 


OCM -H03 00 


=^^2^ 


00i*40 

CO -o^ 


lOCOOO^ 

lOOOi-ICO 


oq 




Total Amount 
paid for 
Attending 
Institutes 


336 97 
610 85 
718 70 
790 27 
242 81 


236 01 
505 10 
201 66 
339 29 
833 05 


373 70 
910 90 
647 43 
237 22 


544 90 
449 59 
736 64 
878 73 


393 06 
973 16 

387 74 
772 19 


CO 
CO 




'-4 1* CO CM CO 


CD CO 1-1 00 1*4 


T-l caifO 


lO CO CO CM 


CD lO 1*4 CO 


O 

CO 




III 
111 


749 36 
711 65 
154 63 
583 63 
646 30 


033 55 
834 78 
950 22 
168 49 
739 77 


604 42 
109 82 
157 96 
294 54 


721 50 
110 69 
674 02 
556 04 


825 57 
626 48 
356 89 
451 12 


5 




OO CM CO If 00 


O3C0 1O1-IO3 


^iS^^ 


CD 00 t^ 1*4 


^^^5^ 






Total Amount 

paid for 
Teaching and 
Supervision 


615 50 
973 91 
071 29 
260 29 
973 40 


812 46 
759 00 
475 82 
799 72 
239 87 


306 47 
485 79 
889 43 
487 73 


321 01 

593 47 

847 72 
796 54 


481 99 
413 26 
926 95 
173 14 


»o 




CM 00 CO 1-1 Oa 

»0 05 CO 03 CO 


1,030 

221 

44 

447 

110 


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1—1 00 1*4 05 

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rf 




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m 














H 














^ 








Union 

Vanderburgl 
Vermillion . 
Vigo 


Wabash... 
Warren. . . . 
Warrick... 
Washington 


Wayne.... 

Wells 

White 

Whitley . . . 




Scott 

Shelby... 
Spencer . . 
Starke.... 
Steuben.. 


St. Joseph 
Sullivan . . 
Switzerlanc 
Tippecanoe 
Tipton . . . 





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2 2 



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S^ 



Department of Public Instruction 



117 



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t^OOlO 05 CO 
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118 



Year Book 






III si 



O « fe 

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■* ^ ^ »OiO 



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9 S 



Department of Public Instruction 



119 



O CD CO 

CO >o ■* 
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co'-* oa 



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at^T-i-^i 



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120 



Year Book 

graduates 1920-1921 



COUNTIES 


Commissioned High Schools 


Certified High Schools 


Common Schools 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 




43 
100 
53 
47 
34 

67 
7 
48 
90 
44 

44 
66 
12 
47 
21 

45 
64 

136 
17 

119 

36 
33 
34 

7 
~ 58 

67 
56 
62 

74 
44 

9 

78 
105 
55 
89 

46 
27 
51 
29 
18 

47 
91 
87 
34 
119 

53 
64 
126 
517 
55 

13 
57 
30 
109 
41 

22 
61 

5 
22 

5 


49 
120 
67 
50 
60 

63 
6 
53 
92 
62 

71 
83 
12 
57 
39 

50 
74 

132 
30 

122 

54 
52 
74 
14 . 
46 

87 
113 

96 
101 

57 

21 
93 
86 
98 
113 

53 
44 
70 
40 

21 

70 

103 
95 
68 

166 

77 
55 

180 

641 

78 

16 
72 
62 
132 
62 

43 
65 
9 
50 
17 


92 
220 
120- 
97 
94 

130 
13 
101 
182 
106 

115 
149 

24 
104 

60 

95 
138 
268 

47 
241 

90 
85 

108 
21 

104 

154 
169 
158 
175 
101 

31 
171 
191 
153 
202 

99 
71 
121 
69 
39 

117 
194 
182 
102 

285 

130 
119 
306 
1,158 
133 

29 
129 

92 
241 
103 

65 

126 

14 

72 
22 








115 

395 

184 

96 

76 

133 
34 
111 
211 
159 

81 
103 

32 
11? 
100 

101 
172 
211 
64 
294 

98 
141 
103 

41 
100 

192 
284 
230 
181 
114 

110 
133 
217 
159 
124 

92 
67 
120 
74 
50 

114 
256 
198 
40 
417 

237 
183 
241 
1,661 
163 

27 
158 
121 
153 
144 

63 
108 
18 
75 
65 


149 
503 
200 
100 
91 

151 
31 
140 

249 
184 

95 
106 

28 
149 
105 

117 
182 
253 
99 
265 

100 
150 
115 
37 
124 

184 
317 
285 
198 
116 

140 
162 
230 
188 
139 

140 
79 
146 
127 
69 

114 
296 
219 
45 
462 

276 
180 
290 
1,813 
181 

36 
196 
174 
179 
163 

67 
147 

21 
150 

68 


m 


Allen 








898 










384 


Benton 


1 


2 


4 


196 


Blackford 


167 


Boone 








284 


Brown 


6 
5 


4 

8 


10 
13 


65 


Carroll 


251 


Cass 


460 


Clark 








343 


Clay 








176 


Clinton 








209 


Crawford 








60 




4 


2 


6 


267 


Dearborn 


205 


Decatur 








218 


DeKalb 








354 


Delaware 








464 




2 


3 


5 


163 


Elkhart 


559 


Fayette 








198 


Floyd 








291 










218 


Franklin 

Fulton 


1 
10 

3 


1 

5 

4 


2 
15 

7 


78 
224 


Gibson 


376 


Grant 


601 




12 


8 


20 


515 


Hamilton 


379 


Hancock 


3 
33 


1 

22 


4 
55 


230 




250 


Hendricks 


295 


Henry 








447 










342 










263 


Jackson 


5 


4 


9 


232 
146 


Jay 








266 


Jefferson 


7 
13 


9 
18 


16 
31 


201 




119 


Johnson . . . 


228 










552 


Kosciusko 








417 


Lagrange 


10 


17 


27 


85 


Lake 


879 


Laporte 


7 
5 


9 
2 


16 

7 


513 




363 


Madison 


531 




3 


3 


6 


3,474 


Marshall 


344 


Martin 








63 




7 


8 


15 


354 




295 










332 










307 










130 


Noble 








255 


Ohio 








39 


Orange 








225 


Owen 


7 




7 


133 



Department of Public Instruction 

GRADUATES 1920-1921— Continued 



121 



counties 


« — 

Commissioned High Schools 


Certified High Schools 


Common Schools 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Parke 


47 
12 
19 
34 
55 

30 
56 
95 

28 
28 

10 
58 
27 
23 
47 

121 
52 
13 

116 

38 

13 
71 
41 
142 

68 
15 
32 

44 

94 
59 
46 
44 

5,218 


47 
12 
25 
52 
52 

32 
75 
121 

27 
62 

22 
51 
36 
37 
53 

151 
89 
15 

126 
35 

20 
126 

65 
166 

84 
10 
45 
33 

135 
64 
61 
42 


94 
24 
44 
86 
107 

62 
131 

216 
55 
90 

32 
109 

63 
60 
100 

- 272 

141 

28 

242 

73 

33 
197 
106 
308 

152 
25 

77 
77 

229 
123 
107 
86 








92 
63 
109 
146 
86 

90 
133 
157 
101 
110 

47 
157 
89 
74 
94 

399 
150 
26 
217 
116 

17 
379 
129 
510 

. 199 
65 
102 
121 

272 
127 
128 
114 


98 
72 
113 
184 
120 

88 
149 
179 
117 
134 

59 
178 
88 
90 
81 

521 
201 
30 
238 
109 

26 
452 
196 
680 

231 
67 
106 
163 

301 
155 
128 
117 


190 


Perry 


8 
20 

1 


17 
6 

2 


25 

26 

3 




Pike 


222 
330 


Porter 


Posey 


206 

178 


Pulaski 
















282 


Randolph 








336 


Ripley 


1 


5 

2 


6 
2 


218 


Rush 


244 


Scott 


106 


Shelby 








335 


Spencer 

Starke 









177 
164 


Steuben. 








175 


St Joseph 








920 


Sullivan 


1 
5 


3 
6 


4 
11 


351 




56 


Tippecanoe 


455 


Tipton 


10 


10 


20 


225 




43 


Vanderburgh . 








831 










325 


Vigo . . 








1 190 


Wabash 








430 


Warren 








132 


Warrick 

Washington 

Wayne 


10 
11 


9 

8 


19 
19 


208 
284 

573 


Wells . . 








282 


White 








256 


Whitley 








231 












Totals 


6,658 


11,876 


211 


199 


410 


14,481 


16,792 


31,272 



122 



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4,819 
1,636 
3,630 
3,574 
4,911 
3,806 
2,911 
4,381 
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3,680 
1,856 


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6,741 
4,411 
4,147 
4,432 
6,421 
21,315 


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3,277 
2,681 
3,526 
7,018 
3,844 
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1,411 
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976 
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896 
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2,610 




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618 
1,894 

717 
2,162 
1,220 

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4,077 
1,511 
3,244 
2,957 
4,145 
3,305 
2,483 
3,566 
635 
3,174 
1,647 




5,829 
3,435 
3,547 
3,536 
5,716 
18,705 




2,674 
2,470 
2,718 
5,789 
3,138 
4,295 
1,165 
6,990 


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3,581 
9,823 
4,392 
11,952 
4,927 
3,940 


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Department of Public Instruction 129 

INDIANA STATE TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

DR. T. C. HOWE, Indianapolis, President. 
JAMES M. LARMORE, Anderson, Vice President. 
FLORENCE CASE, Marion, Secretary. 
EBEN H. WOLCOTT, Indianapolis. 
DONALD DuSHANE, Columbus. 

ESTES DUNCAN, Executive Secretary. 
ROXIE REESE, Clerk. 
E. K. SHUGERT, Bookkeeper. 
MARIE CONOVER, Stenographer. 

On August 1, 1921, the Teachers' Retirement Fund Act of 1915 
became inoperative. The 1921 Act succeeded. 

The department has provided forms for the transaction of business ; 
has arranged for the report of employing officials of the state; has 
urged the payment of arrearages under the old law which is being 
heeded by many teachers. 

Much interest is manifested by the teachers over the state and we 
are expecting an increase of between four and five thousand this year. 

October 1, all annuitants were paid up to date. The department 
is bound to grow rapidly in numbers and funds. 

condition of TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

RECEIPTS 

Securities on hand July 31, 1921 $262,232 80 

Cash on hand July 31, 1921 18,095 64 

Balance state appropriation from auditor 16,000 00 

Arrearages and assessments 2,694 04 

Interest on arrearages 156 99 

; Interest on deposits 61 08 

[ Interest on investments _, 518 75 

Total receipts and balance $299,759 30 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Jxpenses $1,089 63 

muities 36,385 97 

Total disbursements 37,475 60 



Secretary's balance September 30, 1921 $262,283 70 



)— 19930 



REPORT OF PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION 



Part One 



MEMBERS 

JOHN W. McCARDLE, Chairman. 

GLENN VAN AUKEN, Commissioner. 
GEORGE M. BARNARD, Commissioner. 
MAURICE DOUGLASS, Commissioner. 
EDGAR M. BLESSING, Commissioner. 

L. CHESTER LOUGHRY, Secretary. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

H. O. GARMAN, Chief Engineer. 
HARRY BOGGS, Chief Accountant. 
A. B. CRONK, Chief of Tariff Department. 
D. E. MATTHEWS, Chief Railroad Inspector. 
FRANK B. FARIS, Examiner and Librarian. 
CARL WILDE, Director of Service. 



LIST OF EMPLOYES 

ENGINEERS 



Earl L. Carter 
Karl W. Behr 
S. T. Beeker 
Wm. F. Habney 
W. F. Lebo 
H. W. Abbett 



E. C. Read 
D. W. Hufferd 
A. 0. Admire 
D. C. Pyke 
C. B. Feasey 

H. A. Johaningsmeier 



ACCOUNTANTS 



W. P. Bidgood 

Laurence Carter 
E. C. Abell 

E. J. Kastner 



Lloyd O'Connell 
L. D. Bledsoe 
Malcolm Lucas 

W. J. Stoutenburg 



J. Q. Martin 



INSPECTORS 

J. F. Geiger 



Ray Gibbens 



I 



Public Service Commission 131 

tariff department 
H. S. McNeely 

STENOGRAPHERS, REPORTERS AND TYPISTS 

Martha Kaplan Faye Marshall 

Ida Drosdowitz Veva Pitsenberger 

Ruth Bills Lois Bremgle 

May Bolton Kathryn Switzer 

Bess Beal Frances Lang 

Anna Glaska Mary Boles 

Ophelia Jones Estella Sanford 

Nellie Waskom Helen Fussner 

Alice Nichols Opal Ford 

Bertha Walker Anna L. Evans 

ORIGIN 

The Public Service Commission of Indiana v^as established in 1913 
(Acts 1913, p. 167), and began operation May 1, 1913. It superseded 
the Railroad Commission of Indiana, which was established in 1905 
(Acts 1905, p. 83). Under various railroad laws, it has general juris- 
diction over the rates and service of railroads, both steam and electric, 
and railroad matters affecting public safety. Under the Public Service 
Commission Act it has still broader powers over public utilities. The 
term "public utilities" includes street or interurban railway, telephone, 
telegraph, heat, light, water, power, elevator and warehouse utilities, 
whether privately or municipally owned. The Commission's powers over 

^public utilities include the regulation of public utility rates, service, 
securities issues, and the consolidation, purchase or lease of public 

futilities. 

REORGANIZATION 

On May 1, 1921, the Commission was reorganized with the appoint- 
lent of Commissioner and Vice-Chairman John W. McCardle, (Rep.) 
)f Indianapolis, to become Chairman to succeed Chairman Ernest I. 
Lewis, (Rep.) of Indianapolis, who resigned to accept an appointment 
[as a member of the Interstate Commerce Commission; Paul P. Haynes, 
(Rep.) of Anderson, who resigned effective March 31, 1921, was suc- 
'ceeded by George M. Barnard, (Rep.) of Newcastle; Fred Bates John- 
^son, (Dem.) of Indianapolis, whose term expired on May 31, 1921, was 
succeeded by Maurice Douglass, (Dem.) of Flat Rock; Edgar M. Bless- 
ing, (Rep.) of Danville, was appointed to the remaining vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Mr. Lewis and took office on June 17, 1921; the 
term of Glenn Van Auken, (Dem.) of Auburn, expires May 1, 1923. 
On May 1, 1921, the staff of the Commission was reorganized. L. 
Chester Loughry of Monticello was appointed Secretary of the Com- 
mission to succeed Frank P. Litschert who filled the unexpired term of 
Carl H. Mote. H. 0. Garman of Indianapolis was retained as Chief 
Engineer; Harry Boggs was retained as Chief of the Accounting De- 




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(132) 



Public Service Commission l^yj 

partment and A. B. Cronk was retained as Chief of the Tariff Depart- 
ment. Carl Wilde was appointed Director of Service to succeed Munson 
D. Atwater. D. E. Matthews was retained as Chief Railroad Inspector. 

On October 1, 1921, Frank B. Faris of Indianapolis, Assistant 
Librarian and Examiner, was appointed Examiner and Librarian to 
succeed Robert D. Armstrong, who resigned effective October 1, no 
successor being appointed for Mr. Faris. 

The organization of the staff of the Commission is illustrated by 
the chart on page 132. 

In the interests of economy the report of the Commission will not 
be so voluminous as in past years, there being omitted the discussion 
of the various elements of rate making such as "return," "depreciation," 
etc. 

The report of the Commission is composed of two parts: Part One 
outlining the work of the Commission in general, and containing the 
reports of the departments; Part Two, preceded by an index, is made 
up of tables of statistics. 

WORK OF THE COMMISSION 

IN GENERAL 

During the past fiscal year the work of the Commission has been 
somewhat lighter than that of the preceding fiscal year. As shown by 
the following tables 638 formal cases were closed last year as against 
856 the year before. Only 89 cases are pending as of September 30, 
1921, whereas on September 30, 1920, there were 189; on the same date 
in 1919 there were 173 and in 1918, 152. 

The following tabulation shows the condition of the formal docket 
during the year: 

FORMAL DOCKET 

Cases pending September 30, 1920 189 

Cases filed September 30, 1920, to September 30, 1921 538 

Total cases pending during fiscal year 727 

Cases closed during fiscal year 638 

Cases pending September 30, 1921 89 

Table IV (infra) contains a complete list of all cases pending Sep- 
tember 30, 1921. 

The following table shows the number of formal cases on the Com- 
mission's docket at various times since its reorganization on May 1, 
1917. 

May 1, 1917 566 

January 1, 1918 324 

May 1, 1918 79 

September 30, 1918 152 

January 1, 1919 , 152 

February 1, 1919 163 

March 1, 1919 166 

April 1, 1919 , 154 



134 Year Book 

May 1, 1919 112 

September 30, 1919 176 

September 30, 1920 189 

September 30, 1921 89 

The following table compares the work of the fiscal years 1918, 1919, 
1920 and 1921: 

FORMAL DOCKET 

Average 

1913-1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 

Pending at beginning of fiscal year 432* 235 152 173 189 

Filed during fiscal year 738 774 654 872 538 

Total pending during fiscal year 1170 1009 806 1045 727 

Closed during fiscal year ,604 857 633 856 638 

Pending at close of fiscal year .566 152 173 189 89 

During this fiscal year the break in costs of labor and material 
entering into the construction and operation of public utilities, occurred. 
It was during the fore part of this fiscal year that prices reached the 
maximum upward limit. It is some satisfaction to make the observation 
that prices of materials and labor have started on the decline which 
ultimately will result in better public utility service, a more liberal 
policy of making public utility extensions and finally a reduction in 
rates commensurate with the reduction in cost of utility service. 

Much was said during the past four years when prices were rising 
that there would be a time when prices would pass the peak, then decline 
and finally reach a new normal, higher than the alleged pre-war normal. 
We are now able to see that there is no such thing as a normal price. 
It has been found by experience that there was no pre-war normal and 
the indications are that there will be no post-war normal and the 
practice of making valuations based upon certain alleged normals and 
alleged trends is a will-o'-the-wisp. Prices are yet chaotic but they 
are upon a general decline. Engineers and experts in valuation matters 
who have appeared before this Commission and its engineering depart- 
ment never have agreed and probably never will agree upon what con- 
stitutes a normal price or trend price as of any period or time. We 
have found by experience that the figures which give the greatest assist- 
ance to the Commission are those reflecting costs when the items of 
property were new, and other figures reflecting costs based upon definite 
and specific averages, and still other figures reflecting spot prices as of 
some particular time. 

The chart on page 135 shows by curves the fluctuations in prices 
of various commodities from 1912 to date. 

SECURITIES ISSUES 

During the fiscal year the Commission has authorized the issuance of 
$1,827,099 of bonds by municipally owned public utilities and stocks, 
bonds and notes of privately owned utilities in the sum of $19,340,436, 

*This is the average for the four years ending May 1, 1917. 



Public Service Commission 



135 



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136 Year Book 

a grand total of $21,167,535. In all instances except one the rate of 
interest on municipally owned utility bonds was 6 per cent as against 
an average interest rate during the last fiscal year of 5.705 per cent. 
A complete list of all securities authorized will be found as Table 3 
(infra). Privately owned utility bonds bore from 5 per cent to as high 
as 8 per cent. The average rate of interest on privately owned utility 
bonds authorized during the past fiscal year was 6.14 per cent. Some of 
the largest bonds issues were those by the Indiana Power Comjmny, No. 
6026, June 8, 1921, $1,250,000; Merchants Heat and Light Company, No. 
5915, Fehrua/ry 19, 1921, $700,000; Public Utilities Company of Evans- 
ville, No. J^309, February 18, 1921, $1,736,000; Southern Indiana Gas 
and Electric Company, No. ^309, April, 9, 1921, $1,420,000, and Indiana 
Railways and Light Company, No. 6058, June 10, 1921, $420,000. 

In several cases the Commission has directed utilities to amortize 
out of gross income the discount suffered in the sale of stocks and bonds. 
(Re Hydro Electric Light and Power Company, No. 583.li., December 28, 
1920; Re Merchants Heat and Light Company No. 5799, December U, 
1920.) 

In Cause No. 5856, February 25, 1921, the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company was authorized to acquire and hold all, or any part, 
of the common stock of the Indiana Bell Telephone Company, aggregat- 
ing $3,588,800, the issue and sale of which was authorized in Cause No. 
5854, February 23, 1921. 

In several instances, among which was that of the City of Frank- 
fort, Cause No. 58^3, March A, 1921, sinking funds were ordered created 
for the redemption of bonds as they may become due. 

CONSOLIDATION AND SALE 

During the past fiscal year the reorganization of utility properties 
has not been of the magnitude of the preceding year. 

The Interstate Public Service Company was authorized to purchase, 
and the following companies were authorized to sell all of the corporate 
assets of the selling companies in return for stock of the purchasing 
company in the following amounts: 

Common Preferred 

United Gas and Electric Company $200,000 00 $575,000 00 

New Albany Water Works Company 100,000 00 250,000 00 

Louisville and Southern Indiana Traction Company 130,000 00 525,000 00 

Louisville and Northern Railway and Lighting Company 550,000 00 400,000 00 

Central Indiana Lighting Company 150,000 00 250,000 00 

(Causes Nos. 5893, 5894, February 25, 1921.) 

Two steps in the program of the Interstate Public Service Company 
were taken in the preceding fiscal year when, in Cause No. 5070 on January 
3, 1921, it was authorized to purchase the property of the Franklin 
Water, Light and Poiver Company and in Cause No. 5216 on April 2, 
1920, it was authorized to purchase the property of the Indiana Public 
Service Company, which owned and operated gas, electric and water 
utilities in Aurora. Practically all of the stock of both these companies 
was already owned by the Interstate. 



r 



Public Service Commission 1,'j7 

In winding up the reorganization of the Interstate Public Service 
Company the value of the stock of the Louisville and Southern Indiana 
Traction Company, the Louisville and Northern Railway and Lighting 
Company and the Central Indiana Lighting Company was found for 
the purpose of fixing the payment to non-consenting stockholders. (No. 
589 U, Supplemental Order, Ajjril 1, 1921.) 

In Cause No. 5596, November 9, 1920, the Gary Connecting Railroad 
was authorized to purchase all the property known as the Gary Con- 
necting Railroad Division and to pay for the same through the issuance 
of stocks and bonds aggregating $347,000, face value. 

There have been no telephone consolidations or mergers having the 
general interest of those of the year before. 

The largest consolidation which was proposed during the last fiscal 
year was that of the Indiana Electric Corpo^ration whose petition was 
filed on August 11, 1921, wherein it asked authority to purchase the 
properties of the Merchants Heat and Light Comjmny, the Indiana Rail- 
ways and Light ^Company, the Elkhart Gas and Fuel Company, the 
Valparaiso Lighting Company, the Wabash Valley Electric Company, 
the Putnam Electric Company and the Cayuga Electric Company and 
for authority to issue and sell securities for acquiring said properties. 
Securities in the sum of $21,062,000 were proposed to be issued by the 
Indiana Electric Corporation. Two questions presented themselves to 
the Commission: First, whether the value of the property involved 
was sufficient to warrant the carrying of burden bearing obligations in 
the amount which the company thought necessary to consummate the 
purchase; second, whether said properties would earn enough gross in- 
come to pay the fixed charges upon such obligation. The commission 
found that there was not enough fair value in the properties sought 
to be purchased to warrant the assuming and issuing of the amount 
of securities bearing fixed charges which the petitioner thought neces- 
sary to make the purchase, to say nothing of other capital obligations; 
and that the gross income from the properties would not be sufficient 
to discharge the payment of interest upon such fixed obligation. The 
petition was accordingly denied. 

One of the most important orders on valuation during the past fiscal 
year was that of the La Porte Gas and Electric Company (Nos. 5398 
and 5399, December 22, 1920). In that order it was held that the surest 
and most equitable method of insuring stability of values is to consider 
a prudent investment as the primary factor of value, since the invest- 
ment principle insures the utility against the evil effects of recurrent 
fits of economic fortune, which, under any other theory of valuation, 
must in varying degree be suffered by public service companies. 

Another feature of that order was the discussion of the "market 
value" rule. The Commission held that it is obvious that the "market 
value" of public utility property cannot be accepted as the measure of 
value, for the elements which determine the "market value" of property 
include its business and financial condition, its earning ability, the nature 
and usefulness of its physical property, and various other less important 
elements, and the "market value" rule as applied to public utility valua- 



138 



Year Book 



tion would be a reductio ad ahsurdum, for "market value" depends chiefly 
on earnings, and earnings depend on rates, and rates depend on values. 
In that case Commissioners Lewis and McCardle concurred with 
Commissioner Haynes; Commissioner Johnson concurred in the order 
but not in the opinion, and Commissioner Van Auken dissented. 



RATES OF PARTICULAR UTILITIES 

STREET RAILWAY RATES 

The most difficult street railway rate problem with which the Com- 
mission has had to cope has been that of the Indianapolis Street Railway 
Company, where the Commission through conferences and investigations 
has sought to bring about a solution. 

The Inspection Department of the Commission in order to determine 
the effect of "jitney" competition upon the street railway, took two 
counts of two days each to find the number of passengers carried by 
"jitneys." 

The report of the Inspection Department to the Commission shows 
that on May 20 and 21, 1921, a total of 43,099 passengers were carried 
by the "jitneys" making a daily average of passengers carried 21,550 
with an average daily revenue of $1,077.50 or a yearly revenue of 
$393,287.50. On June 30 and July 2, 1921, another test was made. This 
shows a total of 58,890 passengers carried in the two days, an average 
of 29,445 per day at an average revenue of $1,472.25 per day or $537,- 
371.25 per year. 

VALUATION 

Table V (inf(ra) contains a complete table of appraisals and esti- 
mates made by the Engineering Department of the Commission during 
the fiscal year for the use of the Commission in fixing the value of 
public utility property. 

Under the report of the Engineering Department will, also, be 
found a discussion of the methods used by that department in making 
an appraisal upon which a valuation is based. 

REPORTS OF^DEPARTMENTS 
Engineering Department 



Kind of Utility 


Total for Period 
May 1,1913 to 
Sept. 30. 1920 


Total for Period 
Oct. 1, 1920 to 
Sept. 30. 1921 


Grand 
Total 


Electric 


843,233,002 
54,198,263 
37,740,289 
5,084,115 
42,145,609 
25,678,264 


$6,591,265 
2,677,529 

17,664,853 

583,936 

1,495,541 

10,147,090 


$49,824,267 


Electric railway 


56,875,7921 


Gas 


55,405,142 


Heating 


5,668,051 


Telephone 


43,641,1501 


Water 


35,825,354i 






Total 


$208,079,542 


$39,160,214 


$247,239,756 



Public Service Commission 139 

During the past fiscal year less property was valuated than during 
the fiscal year immediately preceding. This is explained by the fact 
that there is more activity and more necessity for valuations when there 
is more reason for contention. When operation costs are rising, the 
operators of the property are continually petitioning for increases in 
rates. When operating costs are falling the consumers are continually 
petitioning for a reduction in rates, and since it occurred in this fiscal 
year that the peak was passed, that is, when we passed from a period 
of rising costs to a period of falling costs there was an interval in this 
fiscal year where the costs remained comparatively stable. While this 
temporary stability of prices held, neither side made much effort for a 
change in rates, each one realizing that a change in conditions was taking 
place and that petitions for increases or decreases in rates could not 
well be sustained because of the inability to predict what might happen 
over a reasonable period of time in the future, for which the rates would 
be effective. 

It may be expected that as costs of operation continue to fall, peti- 
tions for decreases in rates will become more numerous which will in 
turn increase the necessity for valuations for various purposes. 

At times like these when public utility properties have units of 
property in them which have varied in prices as much as 300 per cent, 
it is very necessary to include in each appraisal an explanation of the 
methods of pricing used. 

The following explanation of the methods of pricing used during 
the past fiscal year is typical. 

LAND 

The staff of this Commission appraises land by obtaining data in the 
following manner: We find people who are familiar with property 
values in the immediate vicinity of the land to be priced. We gather 
information from the class of people who are inclined to be conservative 
in their estimate of land values, such as bankers, and we also interview 
the class of people who are inclined to be optimistic and forward looking 
concerning land values, such as real estate dealers. After having 
gathered data from all of these sources (from four to six sources as 
a minimum), we reduce these estimates to a common basis, as, for 
instance, front foot, square foot or acre. After weighing the abilities 
of the various parties from whom information was obtained, a figure 
is adopted by the engineer having this part of the work in charge. 

TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION 

Because of various kinds of material entering into this division of 
the report, different methods were used in obtaining the prices. We 
have prices of cast iron pipe running back as far as 1885, and it is 
easy to get any kind of an average price or present day price desired. 
With valves, fittings, hydrants, etc., prices over extremely long periods 
of years are difficult to obtain because the types of manufacture change 



140 Year Book 

and improvements are made. About the best that can be done relative 
to this kind of material, is to obtain actual original cost new or prices 
averaged over a comparatively short span of years. Where utilities are 
located in industrial communities where many extensions were made 
during the war period for the purpose of serving the munition industries 
the actual unit cost of these properties will run higher than the original 
unit cost new of utility properties located in communities where few- 
extensions were made necessary on account of the lack of industrial 
activity for munition purposes. In order to be fair and reasonable we 
usually made a study of the plant additions made each year. Assuming 
the value of the property to be 100 per cent, we determine the propor- 
tion of the property now in existence that has been added each year. 
In this A^ay we are able to reasonably determine the relationship be- 
tween the unit costs new of the property, and certain other unit costs 
averaged over certain periods of years, and the present day unit costs. 
Necessarily we are compelled to use some kind of average costs, be- 
cause in most cases it is impossible to determine the weighted average 
cost to any company of cast iron pipe. It is impossible to prevent the 
influence of present day prices from creeping into the report, because 
present day prices are most available, and we believe that, conservative 
as we try to be, our valuation is somewhat, but not unreasonably, higher 
than the original cost new of the property. 

BUILDINGS AND MISCELLANEOUS STRUCTURES 

Buildings may be priced on various bases such as square feet of 
ground occupied, square feet of floor in the building, cubical contents 
of the building or a detailed estimated cost of all materials entering 
into the construction of the building. In most cases we are unable to 
get the actual original cost new of the building because the records 
are not available. Many times the building has been constructed in 
sections at different periods of time with different unit prices prevailing, 
and at other times we find the buildings have had extensive alterations 
made to adapt them to new machinery or equipment, all of which usually 
makes it impossible for us to get any kind of an average cost of the 
building. In cases of this kind the Engineering Staff works out an 
estimated cost of reproduction new of the building as a whole, as it 
now stands, including all of its additions and alterations and using an 
assumed set of unit prices which will give a total which would be ample 
for the reconstruction of the building new under conditions and circum- 
stances similar to those which obtained when this particular building 
was constructed. The same principles of pricing are followed in the 
valuation of miscellaneous structures as are followed in pricing the 
buildings. 

PLANT EQUIPMENT 

Plant equipment, such as engines, boilers, pumps, etc., is priced 
after making a study of the actual original cost new as indicated by 
the contracts and specifications (when available), the cost of similar 



Public Service Commission 141 

equipment purchased at about the same time, and the present day cost 
of similar equipment. We finally apply a figure which we consider 
ample to reproduce each piece of equipment under the approximate 
circumstances and conditions obtaining during the time these pieces of 
equipment were purchased and installed. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

General equipment, such as automobiles, trucks, office furniture and 
equipment, shop tools, etc., having a much shorter life than other 
elements of value in this property, is priced at unit prices which reflect 
much more nearly present day prices. In some cases they are present 
day prices; in others the prices are from one to five years old. In any 
case, however, they are prices that are comparatively recent. 

PAVING 

We endeavor to determine in each case the amount and kind of 
paving actually cut, and put upon these items a price Mrhich is sub- 
stantially a five-year average cost. In no case do we allow cost of 
cutting pavement where the pavement v^as put down subsequent to the 
laying of the water mains and service pipes. All pavement cut to repair 
water mains and service water pipes should be paid for out of the 
maintenance fund and is an operating expense, and not a capital charge 
and is therefore excluded from the report. 

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 

The item of materials and supplies is a list of the average quantity 
of supplies which it is necessary to keep on hand in the operation of 
the property. These supplies are purchased more or less currently, 
and, of course, are purchased at prices more nearly current or up to 
date. The list of materials and supplies is not necessarily the materials 
we find when we visit the property but is a list of materials and supplies 
which is carried by the utility on an average over a period of twelve 
months' time. In most cases the prices applied to the materials and 
supplies listed are the prices at which the supplies were purchased. 

STRUCTURAL OVERHEAD CHARGE 

There is another item of cost of physical property that must be 
added to all of the property items referred to above. We call this item 
structural overhead expense, because it is an overhead expense which 
applies to structures. The different elements of cost in this structural 
overhead expense apply to different parts of the pi;operty in varying 
amounts, but we find it practicable to introduce it in a lump sum. The 
structural overhead percentage is not applied to the item of material 
and supplies because these quantities have not entered into the property. 
We have submitted in this report an amount equal to 12 per cent on 
the total of all items exclusive of materials and supplies, which we con- 



142 Year Book 

sider only a tentative figure. If the evidence shows that this cost was 
paid out of operating expenses by the company, we suggest that it be 
eliminated, and if the evidence shows beyond the shadow of doubt that 
more than this much was spent and that it has not been included in 
any of the unit prices, then this percentage should be increased. It is 
shown only for the purpose of calling attention to the fact that such an 
item as this exists, and should be taken care of, and is introduced in 
the amount of 12 per cent as being the approximate residue of such 
items as may not have been included in the unit prices. The item of 
structural overhead cost should include such cost as engineering, super- 
intendence, interest during construction (taxes during construction, fire 
and liability insurance, small omissions of) inventory, contingencies, etc. 
In conclusion, the Engineering Department has found that the rules 
and standards of service for electrical utilities, approved by the Com- 
mission in Cause No. 5344, and the rules and standards of service for 
artificial gas utilities, approved by the Commission in Cause No. 5172, 
and the rules and standards of service for central station hot water 
heating plants, approved by the Commission in Cause No. 4082 have 
proved to be of great assistance to the public, to the utility operators 
and to the Commission Engineers in standardizing public utility service. 
Electric light and power service is being extended more and more into 
the rural districts where telephone service has usually preceded it. 
Some difficulty is now being encountered concerning the location of the 
pole lines on the highways and also difficulty arising from inductive inter- 
ference. The Engineering Department is now formulating a set of rules 
and standards for wire crossings and electrical interference. 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

The industrial depression which started during the latter part of 
the year 1920, coupled with the general tendency of business to return 
to a normal level, is reflected in the annual report of this department 
for the fiscal year 1920-1921. 

The demand for audits and financial investigations for rate making 
purposes has decreased materially, thus enabling this department to 
broaden the scope of its examinations to a greater degree than was 
possible during the war period. The average number of pages per 
audit during the fiscal year 1919-1920 was eighteen while the average 
pages per audit during the fiscal period 1920-1921 was thirty-seven. 

Following is a summary of the audits made in the various periods 
of time since the inauguration of this department: 

Per cent Number Per cent Average 

of of of per 

Months time audits audits month 

July 1, 1913, to September 30, 1917 '51 51.6 136 13.3 2.67 

October 1, 1917, to September 30, 1918 12 12.1 185 18.1 15.42 

October 1, 1918, to September 30, 1919 12 12.1 193 18.8 16.08 

October 1, 1919, to September 30, 1920 12 12.1 347 33.9 28.92 

October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921 12 12.1 163 15.9 13.58 



Totftl .,...,,.,., , 99 100.0 1,024 100.0 10.34 



Public Service Commission 14ri 

Of the 1,024 audits made, the various classes of utilities are repre- 
sented as follows: 

Prior to Present 

Oct. 1, 1920 year Total 

Electric light and power 237 41 278 

Electric railway . 38 5 43 

Gas 77 24 101 

Heating 26 9 35 

Telephone 415 59 474 

Warehouse 1 -^ 1 

Water 67 24 91 

Steam railway — 1 1 

Total 861 163 1,024 

TARIFF DEPARTMENT 

During the past year there have been a number of changes of a 
general nature in the rates applicable to steam and interurban railways. 
This has caused a great many tariffs of such carriers to be filed with 
the Commission. The work of indexing and filing these tariffs has been 
heavy. In addition there have been a great many changes in utility rates 
and the schedules and rate sheets of these utilities have been gone over 
carefully, checked against the ordei* authorizing their filing and passed 
to the files. 

The activities of the Tariff Department, in addition to the routine 
work of the office, have covered a variety of subjects connected with the 
adjustment of rates both of the steam and interurban carriers. The 
work of presenting the St. Paul-Minneapolis adjustment, elsewhere re- 
ferred to, has been accomplished by this department. The chief of the 
department acts also in the capacity of examiner for the Commission, 
pgprticularly in cases involving transportation matters. Because of the 
injunction of the United States District Court, jurisdiction of the Com- 
mission in steam railroad transportation matters has been suspended 
and a large number of formal cases of this character are being carried 
on the Commission's docket without action. 

RAILROAD RATES 

In the last annual report attention was called to the fact that the 
Interstate Commerce Commission had authorized the steam railroad 
carriers in this state to increase their freight rates 40 per cent and 
passenger, milk and cream rates 20 per cent. Attention was also called 
to the fact that the Public Service Commission of Indiana in passing 
upon a like application for authority to increase intrastate freight and 
passenger rates granted authority to increase freight rates only 83 1-3 
per cent (on certain commodities the increase authorized was only 10 
per cent and no increase was authorized on brick and burnt clay products 
taking brick rates) ; no increase was authorized on passenger fares. 

On October 16, 1920, the steam carriers operating in the state of 
Indiana filed their petition with the Interstate Commerce Commission 
stating that they had applied to the Public Service Commission of 



144 Year Book 

Indiana for the same general increases in rates, fares and charges on 
intrastate traffic in Indiana as had been permitted on interstate traffic 
in the proceeding entitled Ex Parte 7h, 58 I. C. C. 220, and 302, but 
that the Indiana Commission had allowed such increase only in part. 
It was further stated that as a result of this action of the Public Service 
Commission an unlawful relationship as between the intrastate and inter- 
state transportation charges was brought into existence. Subsequently, 
the Interstate Commerce Commission instituted a proceeding to investi- 
gate the situation and on January 28, 1921, approved its order in Cause 
No. 11894, entitled Indiana Rates, Fares and Charges, 60 I. C. C. 337. 

The Interstate Commerce Commission found in this order and the 
opinion therein that the rates, fares and charges fixed by the Public 
Service Commission of Indiana in its Order No. 5457 for intrastate appli- 
cation in Indiana, except rates on coal for distances of less than thirty 
miles, subjected persons and localities outside the state to undue prejudice 
and disadvantage and resulted in unjust discrimination against inter- 
state commerce. The carriers were then directed to apply to intra- 
state traffic in Indiana the per cent of increases authorized in Ex Parte 
7Jf, supra, for interstate traffic. 

Immediately upon announcement of the order of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission the Public Service Commission of Indiana filed 
a suit in the District Court of the United States to set aside the order. 
Shortly after this suit was filed the railway companies applied to the 
same court for an injunction restraining the Indiana Commission and 
certain officers of the state from interfering with the application of 
the order of the Interstate Commerce Commission and from taking steps 
to enforce its order in Cause No. 5457 or exercising its jurisdiction under 
the Indiana laws. 

Upon a hearing held on this application an interlocutory injunction 
was issued as prayed. No further steps have been taken in these two 
cases for the following reasons: A similar situation arose in Illinois 
with respect to freight and passenger rates in that state. A similar 
situation arose in Wisconsin with respect to passenger fares. In both 
of these states the matter was tried out in the United States District 
Courts of those states and permanent injunctions were issued against 
the state authorities. Both cases are now pending on appeal to the 
Supreme Court of the United States where they have been briefed and 
argued. It is anticipated that the cases will be disposed of prior to 
January 1, 1922. As to the Indiana situation it was agreed that the 
cases here should be disposed of on the principles laid down by the 
Supreme Court in the Illinois and Wisconsin cases. The Public Service 
Commission is on the brief amici cwiae filed in the cases before the 
Supreme Court on behalf of the railroad and utility commissions of 
forty- two states. 

In granting the interlocutory injunction it has been felt that the 
order of the Federal Court was too broad in that it prohibits the In- 
diana Commission from exercising any jurisdiction over intrastate rail- 
road rates under the Indiana law, whereas there are many rates in this 
state over which jurisdiction might be exercised without violating the 



Public Service Commission 145 

provisions of the Transportation Act of 1920 under which the injunction 
was issued. The Attorney General, therefore, has made application to 
the United States District Court for a modification of the injunction 
order so as to permit the Indiana Commission to exercise its jurisdiction 
under the Indiana law in those cases where no relationship between the 
Indiana intrastate rates and the interstate rates is involved or in those 
cases where the provisions of the Transportation Act of 1920, but for 
the injunction, v^ould leave the Indiana Commission free to act. This 
application of the Attorney General has not yet been passed upon by 
the United States District Court. 

RATES FROM INDIANA TO THE TWIN CITIES 

The annual report for 1920 with respect to the adjustment of 
freight rates from Indiana points to Minneapolis and St. Paul contains 
the following paragraph: 

''Immediately after Federal Control was relinquished on March 1, 
1920, the Public Service Commission of Indiana and the Indiana State 
ChaiAber of Commerce filed their joint petition with the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, bringing before that body the discriminations com- 
plained of in the St. Paul-Minneapolis adjustment. Hearings have been 
held and a mass of evidence introduced, but briefs have not yet been 
announced. Every indication points to the fact that some relief will 
be accorded the Indiana shippers in this respect." 

Subsequently briefs have been filed and a tentative report ren- 
dered by the Interstate Commerce Commission. The tentative report 
fully sustains the position of the Commission and the Indiana State 
Chamber of Commerce and directs the carriers to apply rates from 
Indiana points to the destinations in question which are relatively on 
an equality with rates from Illinois. The tentative report approves 
certain increases in the rates from Illinois territory but requires material 
reductions in the rates from Indiana. The matter is set for argument 
at Washington before the Interstate Commerce Commission on October 
22, 1921. With a favorable tentative report it is expected that a full 
measure of relief will be accorded by the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission in its final order. 

Typical illustrations of the rate situation against which complaint 
is made are as follows: 

1. The distance from Springfield, Illinois, to Minneapolis is 498 
miles, from South Bend, Indiana, 494 miles. The rates for the first 
five classes are as follows: 

12 3 4 5 

Springfield $1.01% .84% .67% .42% .34 

South Bend 1.56 1.30% 1.02 .70 .53% 

2. The distance from St. Louis, Missouri, to Minneapolis is 586 
miles and from Indianapolis, Indiana, 592 miles. The first five class 
rates are as follows: 

12 3 4 5 

St. Louis $1.06% .88% .71 .44 .36 

Indianapolis 1.63% 1.37 1.04 .75% .54 

10—19930 



146 Year Book 

3. The distance from Mattoon, Illinois, to Minneapolis is 555 miles, 
from Ft. Wayne, Indiana, 558 miles with rates on the first five classes 
as follows: 

12 3 4 5 

Mattoon $1.06% .SSVz .71 .44 .36 

Ft. Wayne 1.58% 1.321/2 1.02 1.72 .53% 

4. The distance from Cairo, Illinois, to Minneapolis is 718 miles, 
from New Albany, Indiana, 704 miles with rates on the first five 
classes as follows: 

12 3 4 5 

Cairo $1.35 1.10 .88 .56 .44 

New Albany 1.80 1.47% 1.12% .82 .62 

The tentative order of the Interstate Commerce Commission, if 
adopted, would bring the above competitive rates to a level by increasing 
the Illinois rates and by decreasing the Indiana rates. 

RAILROAD INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

The following is a summary of the work of this department for 
the year ending September 30, 1921: 

The duties of the department have, as usual, varied greatly during 
the year, considerable time being devoted to the investigation of railroad 
and highway crossing accidents. 

Attention is called to Table VI (infra) showing accidents and casual- 
ties on steam and electric railroads in Indiana. The first item men- 
tioned is casualties on passenger trains. There was a great increase in 
the number of passengers killed on passenger trains. This increase was 
caused by a wreck which occurred at Porter, Indiana, on February 27, 
1921, in which a New York Central passenger train collided with a 
Michigan Central passenger train at the intersection of the two roads, 
resulting in the death of thirty-five passengers and two employes and 
also caused injuries to many other passengers. 

It will be noticed in the column showing travellers killed on high- 
ways that there is no considerable change in the number of persons killed 
and injured in the fiscal year just closed, as compared with other years. 
The investigation of highway crossing accidents would however prove 
that in fifteen of the cases reported it was shown that the vehicle travel- 
ling in the highway ran into the side of the train after the train had 
covered the crossing. Such accidents as these are usually disastrous, 
there generally being a loss of life. This is absolute evidence that travel- 
lers in the highway are not using any care or judgment when approach- 
ing railroad crossings. 

Considerable time has been devoted to improper wire construction. 
Numerous complaints have reached the department regarding such con- 
struction over and across railroads. Some few accidents have occurred 
in the state because of improper wire construction; and trainmen riding 
on top of cars have been injured by wire sagging closer to the tops of 
the cars than the law governing such construction permits. 



Public Service Commission 147 

LIBRARY 

The duties of the Librarian may be summarized as follows: 

(1) Editing orders of the Commission, checking figures, writing 
headnotes, etc. 

(2) Editing all publications of the Commission, such as annual 
and monthly reports, compilations of statutes, etc. 

(3) Investigating questions referred by the Commission, and sub- 
mitting reports thereon. 

(4) Caring for the Commission's library, and furnishing material 
to the Commission on questions connected with regulation. 

(5) Service to city attorneys, publicists, utilities and others desir- 
ing information on questions connected with regulation, both by corres- 
pondence and by consultation. 

The Librarian is also Examiner and devotes most of his time to 
taking evidence and preparing it for presentation to the Commission 
for its consideration. 

The library of the Commission contains approximately 1,200 volumes, 
and a large collection of pamphlets and other printed matter on public 
utility regulation. It is open to all who desire to consult it, and the 
services of the Librarian are at their disposal. Many city attorneys, in 
particular, have made use of this service. 

During the fiscal year, the Librarian has studied the Commission 
cases, and written reports to the Conamission on the following questions, 
among others: 

(1) (a) Right of Commission to raise rates in excess of franchise 
rates, and (b) whether value of utility's property which was received 
by it from a city might be considered in rate making. 

(2) Whether utility asking modification of order authorizing se- 
curities issues is required to pay second fee for authorization. 

(3) Value of non-utility property (for purposes of comparison). 

(4) Jurisdiction of Commission in matters of extensions of utility 
property. 

(5) Jurisdiction of Commission over municipality borrowing money 
for utility purposes without issuing securities. 

(6) Operation of indeterminate permit in Indiana. 

(7) Right of water company to collect for so-called service for 
private fire protection. 

(8) Emergency rate relief under Public Service Commission Act 
with especial reference to whether Commission is empowered or re- 
quired to fix rates which will yield more than a reasonable return on 
fair value of property. 



148 Year Book 

SEEVICE DEPARTMENT 

This department was established by the Commission as of Septem- 
ber 1, 1919. Its personnel consists of the Director of Service and one 
other employe, who combines the functions of stenographer and clerk. 

RECORDS AND FILES 

The chief records of this department are known as Adjustment 
Records. For each complaint regarding the service, charges or prac- 
tices of any utility, concerning which any correspondence is necessary, 
a file is made and to this file a number is assigned. Index cards relating 
to the Adjustment Records are prepared, through the use of which any 
case can be located by the name of the complainant, the name of the 
utility or the number of the file. 

For matters which may be adjusted by telephone or informal con- 
ferences no file is made, but a memorandum of the complaint and the 
mode of adjustment is prepared and filed under the name of the utility 
complained of. These files are referred to as Informal Complaints. 

Matters involving formal hearings and decisions by the Commission 
are docketed and filed as Formal Cases. 

In addition to these files, there are the usual letter files, calorimeter 
reading files and miscellaneous. Of late there has been added to the 
records of this department a file for protests made by consumers against 
requested increases of rates by utilities. 



SCOPE 

The questions coming before this department are of great variety. 
Matters which do not fall within the province of the other divisions of 
the Commission are referred to the Service Department. These matters 
refer to all classes of utilities — electric, gas, water, telephone, street and 
interurban railways, etc. Because this department is in constant com- 
munication with consumers of utility products, it is through it that the 
Commission is in most intimate and constant contact with the public. 
It is through this department that the Commission becomes cognizant 
at first hand of the attitude of the public toward the utilities and of 
the opinion of the public of the service it is receiving. 



SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES 

An idea of the work handled by this department during the year 
ending September 30, 1921, may be gathered from the following: 

Adjustment cases disposed of 400 

Adjustment cases open October 1st 69 

Informal complaints disposed of 209 

Formal cases disposed of 28 

Formal cases open October 1st 9 

Number of visits to various places in the state 110 



Public Service Commission 149 

public relations 

This department believes that the greatest service it can render 
the public is by bringing about a proper relation between the utility on 
the one hand and the consumer on the other. This relation can only be 
brought about by informing the consumer of the problems and trials 
with which the utility must contend in order to give service — problems 
and trials which are inherent in the very nature of the business con- 
ducted by the utility — on the one hand; and to convince the utility that 
every doubt must be resolved in favor of the consumer, on the other; 
that only the utility which renders adequate service can receive an ade- 
quate rate, and that courtesy and forbearance are the accompaniments 
which alone can render service satisfactory. 

It is highly desirable that each consumer acquaint himself in a 
general way with the methods of production of the utility products 
which he is purchasing. The larger telephone companies, realizing this, 
are encouraging civic and mercantile organizations to visit "their plants 
and are endeavoring to bring- to the knowledge of the public an under- 
standing of their work and their problems. This practice is highly com- 
mendable and should be used by other utilities. 

In general this department has found that the public is entirely 
reasonable in its demands and that the desire of the consumer is for 
good service, for which he is entirely willing to pay an adequate rate. 
He objects to paying for adequate service and receiving service which 
is inadequate. He objects to discourtesy and to the practice still em- 
ployed by a few utilities of sending from officer to officer and from de- 
partment to department, those who desire to make complaints. He 
objects to standing in line for an unduly long time in order to pay his 
bill. He objects to the reluctance displayed by some utilities to offer 
explanations of charges that appear to him to be obscure. He objects 
to the attitude a few utilities still display of believing the consumer 
incapable of understanding their problems, and their difficulties. 

Occasionally, it is true, a consumer takes an unjustifiable and un- 
reasonable attitude and assumes that all utilities are attempting to 
overcharge him on the one hand and to lower the standards of his 
service on the other. The number of consumers of this type in com- 
parison to the entire number of consumers of utility products is neg- 
ligible. 

The experience of this department has been gratifying in that it 
has found that utilities generally are aware of the fact that their first 
duty is to give good service and to satisfy the consumer; they have 
found that courtesy pays and that no credit is given them for good 
service unless accompanied by courteous treatment. Many of the larger 
utilities have established service departments to whom the complaining 
consumer is directly referred and they have so arranged their collection 
department that at busy times a larger number of receiving windows 
is available in order that no customer need waste much time standing 
in line to pay his bill. There are a few notable exceptions consisting 
of utilities who have not yet become aware of the fact that their primary 



150 Year Book 

reason for their existence is the rendering of service. It is probable that 
utilities maintaining this attitude will not long survive the stress of 
these times. 

PUBLIC USE OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The records of the department show that the public is coming more 
and more to avail itself of the department's services. This is highly grati- 
fying not only because the purposes of the establishment of this depart- 
ment are thus served, but because in that way the Commission itself is 
kept in close and constant touch with the needs of that portion of the 
public which consumes the products of the utilities. 



Public Service Commission 15 1 



PART TWO 

TABLES 



Index to Statistical Tables 
Table No. 

I. Financial report of the Commission for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1921. 

II. Comparative financial statement for fiscal years ending Septem- 
ber 30th. 

III. Public utility securities authorized during the fiscal year ending 

September 30, 1921. 

IV. Cases pending before the Commission on September 30, 1921. 

V. Appraisals of public utility property made by the Engineering 
Department of the Commission during the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1921. 

VI. Accidents and casualties on steam and electric railroads in In- 
diana, during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1921. 

VII. Operating statistics of electric railroads for the calendar year 
1920. 

VIII. Operating statistics of public utilities for the calendar year 1920. 

IX. Revenues and expenses of public utilities per unit for the calendar 
year 1920. 



152 Year Book 



TABLE 1 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
(For fiscal year ending September 30, 1921) 

(A) RECEIPTS 

Total fees collected during year available for use of Commission, (being 
statutory fees in authorizing the issue of common and preferred stock, 
bonds, and notes by various utilities) $45,103 89 

Total receipts collected (being amounts refunded by various utilities to reim- 
burse the state for expenses incurred by the Commission in making audits 
of books and appraisals of property as provided by statute ; fees in meter 
test cases, charges for copies of orders, evaluation, etc.) 37,521 94 

Total $82,625 83 

(B) EXPENDITURES 

Salaries of commissioners and secretary $32,655 73 

Salaries of accountants, engineers, librarian, inspectors, clerks, reporters and 

stenographers 96,630 00 

Unclassified personal service ....,..• 8,275 00 

Traveling expense 13,596 23 

Postage 854 00 

Telephone, telegraph, expressage 1,586 71 

Office supplies, printing, etc 7,707 71 

Furniture, typewriters, fixtures 1,546 22 

Miscellaneous 799 03 



Total $163,650 63 



Public Service Commission 



158 



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157 



TABLE IV. 

CASES PENDING BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVKIE (X)MMLSSION 
September 30, 1921 



Docket 
No. 


Parties to Case 


Subject Matter 


1810 
4449 
4620 

4796 
4860 
5311 
5312 
5317 


C. & E. I. Railroad 

Interstate Public Service Company 

Indianapolis Telephone Company and Centrab Union 

Telephone Company 

Indiana General Service Company 

LaPorte Gas and Electric Company 

Indianapolis Light and Heat Company 

Merchants Heat and Light Company 

City of Mt. Vernon v. Mt. Vernon Electric Light and 


Application to I. C. C. to abandon. 

Fares. 

Modify order. 

Rates. 

Rates. 

Valuation. 

Valuation. 

Authority to appraise. 

Rates. 

Rates. 

Rates. 

Inadequate service. 
Grade separation. 

Rates. 


5369 
5398 
5399 
5557 

5647 
5655 


Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Company 

LaPorte Gas and Electric Company 

LaPorte Gas and Electric Company 

Town of Wolcottville et al. v. LaGrange County Light 

and Power Company 

E. W. Lee, et al. v. Big Four Railway Co 


Indiana Log Shippers Association v. B. & 0. Railroad 
Company .... 


5661 
5678 
5684 
5701 
5722 


Greencastle Gas and Electric Company 

Kingan and Company, Ltd 

W. R. Tincher, et al. v. B. & 0. Railroad Company. . . . 

I. & C. Traction Company 

Crothersville Water and Electric Company and Town of 


Rates. 
Rates. 
Crossing. 
Rates. 


5723 
5740 


Indiana General Service Company 

Indiana Railways and Light Company 


Service basis of charge for hot water heating 

service. 
Valuation 


5818 
5851 
5866 
5880 


Macksville Gravel Company v. Penn. Railroad Company 
Vigo Minin''" Company v I C Railroad Co. 


Switching rates. 
Reparation 


Princeton Coal Company v. C. cfe. E. T. Railroad Company 
Town of Ferdinand v. Ferdinand Electric Light and 


Rates. 
Service. 


5897 


Wabash Valley Electric Company v. C. &. E. I. Railroad 




5898 
5912 


Ayreshire Coal Company v. Southern Railway Company 
Mt. Vernon Canning Company v. L. & N. Railroad 


Rates. 
Reparation. 


5919 


Utilities Development Corporation v. P. C. C. & St. L. 


Rates. 


5926 
5927 


City of Lebanon v. Interstate Public Service Company. . 
Ft. Branch Coal Mining Company v. C. *. E. I. Railroad 


Inadequate service, violation of contract, 
tariff, etc. 

Equalization of rates. 


5966 
5972 
5977 
5981 
5993 




Rates. 




Rates. 


Robt. E. Williams et al. v. Big Four Railway Company. 
P P P ^ c;+ T, Pdilwrsv PnTTinnnv 


Crossing. 

Abandon station, Mohawk. 


Town of Paoli and Paoli Water and Light Company and 




6018 


Indianapolis Street Railway Company and Interurban 


Adequate freight terminal facilities. 


6037 
6038 
6044 
6045 
608« 


Pennsylvania Railroad Company v. Town of Hobart. . 
TnriioTici Rpll Tplpnlifinp rinmnfl.nv 


Ordinance No. 275. 
Rates. 




Interchange connection. 




Toll rates. 


Sullivan Telephone Company and Glendora Coal Com- 


Contract. 


6087 
6092 
6106 




Rates. 




Rates. 


Link Belt Company et al. v. Mercha,nts Heat and Light 


Rates. 


6107 


Electric Steel Company of Indiana et al. v. Indianapolis 


Rates. 


6108 


Steuben County Farmers Federation v. Steuben County 

TplpnVinnp Pnmnanv 


Rates and service. 


6110 
6111 
6113 


Tn/^iono 'Roll TplprvVinnp Pnmnnnv 


Rates. 




Rates. 


Frank A. Linville et al. v. Indiana Bell Telephone Com- 


Rates and service. 


6120 
6121 


TToo+ovTi Inrliono TplpnVinnp nnmnanv 


Physical connection. 


Town of Kirklin v. C. I. & L. Railway Company 


Crossing protection. 



158 Year Book 

IV. CASES PENDING BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION— Continued 



Docket 
No. 



Parties to Case 



Subject Matter 



6125 

&.6128 

L 6132 

I 6133 

; 6134 

6151 

i 6152 

6155 

6159 



6162 

K 6164 

» 6171 

Er6172 

fe 6173 

f 6174 

I 6176 

6177 

6178 

6179 

,6180 

6181 

6182 
6183 
6184 
6185 



6210 
6214 
6215 
6217 
6218 
6219 
6220 
6221 



6226 
6229 



Town of Greenwood v. Interstate Public Service Com- 
•ilpany 

Town of Wolcottville v. LaGrange Co. Light and Power 

» Company 

Thomas Conner et al. v. Indiana General Service Com- 
pany 

John S. Knapp et al. v. Indiana Power Company 

Town of LaGrange v. LaGrange Light and Power Com- 
pany 

C. F. Robertson, et al. v. I. C. C. Railroad Company. . 

Greencastle Telephone Company 

Rochester School City and Rochester School Township 
v. United Public Service Company 

Frankton Corporation and Indiana General Service Com- 
pany 

Town of North Judson v. P. C. C. & St. L. Railroad 
Company 

Ft. Wayne and Northeastern Railway Co 

City of Elkhart v. Elkhart Gas and Fuel Co 

Town of Corydon 

Indiana Bell Telephone Company 

Bryant Electric Company 

Citizens Gas Company 

Citizens Gas Company 

Citizens Gas Company 

Central Indiana Gas Company 

North Judson Water Company and Town of North 
Judson 

Ingalls Telephone Company and Fall Creek Telephone 
Company 

Citizens Gas and Fuel Company of Terre Haute, Indiana 

Indiana Service Corporation and Town of Monroeville. . 

G. P. Moss et al. v. Pennsylvania Railroad System 

Orange County Public Service Company v. South 
Central Service Company 

James Hodgson and Sons v. C. I. dfc L. Ry 

City of Goshen v. Goshen Gas Company 

Home Telephone Company 

Town of Knightstown and Fred Brenen, Carthage 

Town of Liberty Water Works 

LaPorte Gas and Electric Company v. City of LaPorte. 

Town of Monroe 

Edgar M. Stevens v. C. I. & L. Railway 

Farmer's Mutual Telephone Company v. Pierceton 
Telephone Company 

Burrows Lumber Company v. Wabash Railroad Com- 
pany 

Town of Knightstown v. George Watts, Grace Reagan, 
Lora Garritson 

Arthur Hegewald et al. v. Interstate Public Service Com- 
pany 



Adequate water pressure and supply at 
{street hydrants. 

Rates. 

Rates. 

Adequate pressure and supply of water at 
fire hydrants. 

Rates. 

Crossing protection. 

Rates. 

Rates. 

Refusal to furnish electric energy to 
Urmston Grain Co. 

Crossingjprotection. 

Rates. ^M 

Rates. 

Rates. 

Pvates. 

Rates.^4 

Surrender of franchise. 

Siu-render of franchise. 

Surrender of franchise. 

Stock. 

Contract of lease. 

Purchase and sale. 
Valuation. 
Purchase and sale. 
Miners train. 



Reparation. 

Rates. 

Stock. 

Purchase and sale of electric current. 

Rates. 

Ordinance. 

Flagman. 

Reparation. 

Toll connection. 

Station facilities. 

Appropriation and condemnation of lands. 

Rates. 



Public Service Commission 



159 



TABLE V. 

APPRAISALS OF PUBLIC UTILITY PROPERTY BY THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 
During fiscal year ending September 30, 1921 



A. Electric 



Name of Utility 



Location 



Date of 
Appraisal 



Cost of repro- 
duction new 
as found by 
Engineering 
Department 



I 



Hagerstown Municipal Light Co 

Wabash Valley Electric Co 

Wabash Valley Electric Co.... 

Wabash Valley Electric Co 

Wabash Valley Electric Co 

Montpelier Utilities Co 

Montpelier Utilities Co 

Albany Water & Electric Co 

Lagrange Co. Light & Power Co 

Lagrange Co. Light & Power Co 

Lagrange Co. Light & Power Co 

Lagrange Co. Light & Power Co 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Martinsville Gas & Elec. Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co. 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Indiana Power Co 

Butler Utilities Company 

Butler Utilities Company 

Butler Utilities Company 

Butler Utilities Company 

Decatur Light & Power Co 

Zionsville Water & Electric Co 

Boonville Elec. Lt. & Power Co 

Roachdale Electric Co 

Roachdale Electric Co 

Elec. Lt. & Pr. Co. of Ferdinand 

Town of Ferdinand 

Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.) . 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (South Dist.). 

Argos Elec. Lt. & Water Plant 

Brookville Electric Co 

Brookville Electric Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 



Hagerstown. . 

Clinton 

Transmission . 
Dana 



Montpelier .... 

Pennville 

Albany 

Lagrange 

Trans. & Rural . 
Wolcottville . . . 
Rome City .... 

Mitchell 

Martinsville . . . 

Vincennes 

Trans. & Rural. 
Edwardsport.. . 

Bicknell 

Bloomfield 

Worthington. . . 

Dugger 

Odon 

Petersburg .... 
Wheatland .... 

Bruceville 

Lyons 

Switz City 

New Berry .... 

Elnora 

Plainville 

Sandborn 

Illinois Trans . . 
Abandoned Prp 

Linn Mine 

Butler 

Trans. & Rural. 

St. Joe 

Spencerville 

Decatur 

Zionsville 

Boonville 

Ladoga 

Trans. Roachdale-Ladoga 

Ferdinand , 

Ferdinand 

Sullivan. ........ 

Transmission ... 

Jasonville 

Clay City 

Farmersburg 

Shelburn 

Hymera. 

Coabnont 

Argos 

Brookville 

Trans. & Rural. . 

Kokomo 

Trans, and Rural 

Alto 

Amboy 

Boyleston 

Burlington 

Converse 

Forest 

Galveston 

Greentown 

Herbst 



Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Nov. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Jan. 1, 1921 
Feb. 1, 1921 
Feb. 1, 1921 
Feb. 1, 1921 
Feb. 1, 1921 
Feb. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Apr. 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
Mavjl, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 



118,183 

21.5,866 

159.8.5.5 

14,112 

9,520 

69,720 

31,199 

48,079 

71,956 

24,488 

11,541 

10,022 

45,864 

52.573 

637,571 

965,413 

1,173,166 

122,949 

76,261 

35,363 

30,920 

32,929 

97,573 

4,049 
17,379 
14,840 

6,442 

5,578 
13,572 
13,267 
18,505 
130,126 
40,405 
353,292 
26,224 

8,798 

3,367 

1,456 

129,390 

17,649 

78,893 

16,250 

3,797 
14,606 

2,987 
127,805 
71,812 
70,281 
24,960 
13,731 
22,054 
11,917 

2,688 
16,978 
26,130 

7,898 

1,066,831 

83,324 

1,705 

7,804 
329 

5,361 
30,401 

3,488 

9,536 
14,147 

1.203 



160 



Year Book 



V. APPRAISALS OF PUBLIC UTILITY PROPERTY— Continued 
A. Electric 



Name of Utility 


Location 


Date of 
Appraisal 


Cost of repro- 
duction new 
as found by 
Engineering 
Department 


Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 


Hillisburg 

Kempton 

Kirklin. 

Michigantown 

Middle Fork 

New London 

Point Isabelle 

Russiaville 

Scircleville 

Sims 

Swayzee 

West Middleton 

Cayuga 

Transmission 

Newport 


May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1. 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
Aug. 1, 1921 
Aug. 1, 1921 
Aug. 1, 1921 


$2,126 
7,549 
9,434 
8,150 




Indiana Railways and Light Co ... 


476 




2,249 


Indiana Railways and Light Co 


1,128 




11,036 


Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 


2,511 

1,803 

11,088 

4,775 


Cayuo-a Elec Co 


17,662 


Cayuga Elec. Co 

Cayuga Elec. Co 


7,056 
7,844 


Total 






$6,591,265 











B. Electric Railway 





Gary (Inter.) 


Oct. 1, 1920 
Mar. 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 
May 1, 1921 


$420,309 


Vincennes Traction Co 


Vincennes . ... 


270 105 




Kokomo (Inter.) 

Kokomo (St. Ry.) 


1,576,567 


Indiana Railways and Light Co 


410 548 






Total 






$2 677 529 











C. Gas — Artificial 



Sheridan Gas Oil and Coal Co 


Sheridan 


Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Oct. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 
Dec. 1, 1920 

Dec. 1, 1920 

Dec. 1, 1920 
Jan. 1, 1921 
Jan. 1, 1921 
Jan. 1, 1921 
Jan. 1, 1921 
Jan. 1, 1921 
Feb. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Mar. 1, 1921 
Apr. 1, 1921 
July 1, 1921 
July 1, 1921 
July 1, 1921 
Aug. 1, 1921 
Sept. 1, 1921 


$61 180 


Central Fuel Company . . . 


Rushville 


70 855 


Fortville Gas Co 


Fortville 


46,304 


Oakville Gas Company 


Oakville 


6 467 


Union Ht. Lt. and Power Co 




107 ,315 


Union Ht Lt and Power Co 


Collect and Trans 

Union City 

Portland 


90 870 


Union Ht Lt. and Power Co 


71,974 


Union Ht Lt and Power Co 


79,298 
277,232 


Northern Ind Gas and Elec. Co ; 


Peru 


Northern Ind Gas and Elec Co 


Logansport . 


369 370 


Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co 

Peru Gas Company 


Wabash 

Peru . .... 


226,982 
253 245 


The Ind Natl Gas and Oil Co 


E. Chicago 

Trans. Ijine 


52,086 


The Ind Natl Gas and Oil Co 


887,702 
36,717 


The Ind Natl Gas and Oil Co ... 


(Kokomo-E. Chicago) 
Trans. Line 


The Ind Natl Gas and Oil Co 


(E Chicago-Comp. House) 
Kokomo Station and Wells 
Indianapolis 


618,771 




7,466,045 




4,502,766 




Auburn 

Garrett 

Kendallville 

Sullivan 

Michigan City 

Liberty 

Gary 

Petersburg 

Trans, and Rural 

Winslow 

Columbus 


140,514 


Indiana Fuel and Lioht Co 


133,329 




194,169 


Dome Gas Co 


42,824 




498,746 


Liberty Gas Lt and Fuel Co 


26,653 


Gary Heat Lt. and Water Co 


922,525 


Bement Gas Co 


19,594 




11,688 


Bement Gas Co 


9,120 


nnliiTnhii<5 frns Liirht Co 


213,044 






227,468 








Total 







$17,664,853 









Public Service Commission 



161 



V. APPRAISALS OF PUBLIC UTILITY PROPERTY— Continued 
D. Heating 



Name of Utility 


Location 


Date of 
Appraisal 


Cost of repro- 
duction new 
as found by 

Engineering? 

Department 


Central Heating Company ... 


Anderson 


Oct. 1, 1920 
May 1. 1921 
Aug. 1, 1921 


$234,381 
162,976 
186,579 


Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Citizens Mutual Heating Co . . . 


Kokomo 

Terre Haute 




Total ■ 






$583,936 









E. Telephone 



Central Indiana Tel. Co 

Spiceland Cooperative Tel. Co . . . 
Spiceland Cooperative Tel. Co . . . 

Morgantown Tel. Co 

Morgantown Tel. Co 

Roachdale Tel. Co 

Monroe Tel. Co 

Odon and Madison Twp. Tel. Co. 

Commercial Tel. Co 

So. Ind. Tel. and Telegraph Co . . 
So. Ind. Tel. and Telegraph Co. . 
So. Ind. Tel. and Telegraph Co . . 
Uniondale Rural Tel. Co 



Mt. Zion Telephone Co 

New Home Tel. Co 

Avilla Mutual Tel. Co 

Mooresville Tel. Co 

Citizens Telephone Co . . 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Southern Ind. Tel. and Telegraph Co . 

Indiana Bell Tel. Co 

The Brookville Tel. Co 

Greencastle Tel. Co 

Roanoke Telephone Co 



Total . 



Sheridan 

Spiceland 

Mays 

Morgantown 

Nashville 

Roachdale 

Monroe 

Odon 

Warsaw 

Scottsburg 

Lexington 

Little York 

Uniondale Ossian and 

Zanesville 

Mt. Zion, Etc 

Leo 

Avilla 

Mooresville 

Fairmount 

Fowlertown 

Seymoiir 

Muncie 

Brookville 

Greencastle 

Roanoke 



Oct. 1, 1920 

Oct. 1, 1920 

Oct. 1, 1920 

Oct. 1, 1920 

Oct. 1, 1920 

Oct. 1, 1920 

Oct. 1, 1920 

Nov. 1, 1920 

Nov. 1, 1920 

Dec. 1, 1920 

Dec. 1, 1920 

Dec. 1, 1920 

Jan. 1, 1921 

Feb. 1, 1921 

Feb. 1, 1921 

Feb. 1, 1921 

Mar. 1, 1921 

Apr. 1, 1921 

Apr. 1, 1921 

May 1, 1921 

Apr. 1, 1921 

June 1, 1921 

Aug. 1. 1921 

Sept. 1, 1921 



S38,801 
22,790 

9,850 
13,977 

2,524 
15,398 
23,923 
11,000 
148,639 
30,068 

4,236 

1,294 

25,000 
17,000 
26,714 
27,511 
41,950 
58,978 
5,419 
82,807 
703,520 
78,284 
65,440 
40,418 



$1,495,541 



F. Water 



Frankfort Water Co 

Richmond City Water Works 

Town of Converse Water Plant 

Wabash Valley Electric Co 

Butler Utilities Co 

Decatur Light and Power Co 

Muncie Water Works Co 

Kokomo Water Works Co 

Logansport Mun. Water Wks. Dept. . 
Zionsville Water and Elec. Lt. Co . . . . 

Vincennes Water Supply Co 

Jeffersonville Water Co 

Corydon Water Works 

Lanesville Water Works 

Lafayette Water Works , 

West Lafayette Water Co 

Brookville Mun. Water Works 

Liberty Mun. Water Works 

Cambridge City Mun. Water Plant. . . 

Muncie Water Works Co 

Muncie Water Works Co 

E. Chicago and Ind. Harbor Water Co 

The Terre Haute Water Co 

Summitville Water Co 

Fairmount Water Co 



Frankfort ..... 

Richmond 

Converse 

Jasonville 

Butler 

Decatur 

Muncie 

Kokomo 

Logansport .... 

Zionsville 

Vincennes 

Jeffersonville. . . 

Corydon 

Lanesville 

Lafayette 

W. Lafayette . . 

Brookville 

Liberty 

Cambridge City 

Muncie 

Buck Creek Sta. 
East Chicago . . 
Terre Haute . . . 
Simmiitville . . . 
Fairmount 



Oct. 1, 1920 


8391,055 


Oct. 1, 1920 


952,108 


Nov. 1, 1920 


36,171 


Dec. 1, 1920 


44,917 


Dec. 1, 1920 


11,767 


Dec. 1, 1920 


163,711 


Jan. 1, 1921 


730,000 


Jan. 1, 1921 


771,339 


Jan. 1, 1921 


607,720 


Jan. 1, 1921 


10,213 


Jan. 1, 1921 


496,194 


Apr. 1, 1921 


265,331 


Apr. 1, 1921 


35,528 


Apr. 1, 1921 


11,770 


Apr. 1, 1921 


760,298 


Apr. 1, 1921 


168,908 


May 1, 1921 


85,375 


May 1, 1921 


59,236 


May 1, 1921 


63.307 


May 1, 1921 


810,456 


May 1, 1921 


68,534 


May 1, 1921 


1,217,485 


June 1, 1921 


1,798,636 


July 1, 1921 


16,172 


July 1, 1921 


36,922 



11—19930 



162 



Year Book 



V. APPRAISAL OF PUBLIC UTILITY PROPERTY-Continued 

F. Water 



Name of Utility 


Location 


Date of 
Appraisal 


Cost of repro- 
duction new 
as found by 
Engineering 
Department 


Gas City Water Co 


Gas City . . 


July 1, 1921 


$45 744 


Fortville Water Co 


Fortville 


Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 


1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 


23,289 


Frankton Water and Light Co 


Frankton 


17,520 


Alexandria Water Co 




109,133 


Delphi Water Works 


Delphi . ... 


76,003 


Attica Water Works ; 


Attica 


79,390 


West Lebanon Water Co 


W. Lebanon .... 


16,531 


Vanburen Water Works 




14,764 


Warren Water Co 


Warren 


20,461 


Upland Water Co 


Upland 


11,908 


Hartford City Mun. Water Works 


Hartford City . . 


112,793 


Yorktown Water Works Co 




6,401 










Total 


$10,147,090 











G. Recapitulation 



Kind of Utility 


Total for Period 
May 1, 1913 

to 
Sept. 30, 1917 


Total for Period 
Oct. 1, 1917 

to 
Sept. 30, 1918 


Total for Period 
Oct. 1, 1918 

to 
Sept. 30, 1919 


Total for Period 
Oct. 1, 1919 

to 
Sept. 30, 1920 


Total for Period 
Oct. 1, 1920 

to 
Sept. 30, 1921 


Grand 
Total 


Electric 

Electric Railw'y 


$22,136,906 


$8,201,015 
38,369,422 
3,676,286 
1,071,973 
2,210,235 
2,475,769 


$3,449,312 
5,202,593 
1,132,595 
1,597,530 

10,787,300 
3,344,641 


$9,445,769 
10,626,248 
12,031,135 
722,103 
22,111,917 
6,951,167 


$6,591,265 
2,677,529 

17,664,853 

583,936- 

1,495,541 

10,147,090 


$49,824,267 
56,875,792 


Gas 

Heating 

Telephone 

Water 


10,900,273 
1,692,509 
7,036,157 

12,906,687 


45,405,142 

5,668,051 

43,641,150 

35,825,354 


Total 


$54,672,532 


$56,004,700 


$35,513,971 


$61,888,339 


$39,160,214 


$247,239,756 



Public Service Commission 



163 



TABLE VI 

ACCIDENTS AND CASUALITIES ON STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILROADS IN INDIANA 

A. Steam Railroads — Classified 

(1) Passengers 





Year Ending 
June 30, 1918 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1919 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1920 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1921 


a. Location- 
Oil passenger train 


116 
6 
16 


89 
2 
12 


93 

16 


196 




4 


On station ground 


9 






Totals 


138 

66 
14 
19 
10 

1 
28 


103 

16 
29 
14 
8 

36 


109 

18 
3 

20 

20 


48 


209 


b. Causes — 
Collision . . .... 


110 




34 


Getting on and off moving trains . . . 


15 


Getting on and off after stop is made 

Defective and unlighted station and platforms. 
Miscellaneous 


11 

39 


Totals 


138 

9 
2 
1 

"is 

16 
95 


103 

6 
4 
1 
1 
14 
13 
64 


109 

9 

1 
1 
1 
7 
18 
72 


209 


c. Results — 
Deaths 


37 




1 


Loss of finger or toe . . . 


2 







Fracture or dislocation 

Sprain 

Cuts and bruises 


9 
20 
130 




10 






Totals 


138 


103 


109 


209 







(3) Travelers on Highway 



a. Location — 
In vehicles. . 


393 
43 


306 
30 


375 
25 


346 


On foot 


26 






Totals 


436 

409 
1 

"26 


336 

323 

1 

"i2 


400 

391 

1 

"'8 


372 


h. Causes — 
Struck on crossing 


362 


Teams frightened 




Defective crossings 






10 






Totals 


436 

175 

1 

"6 

38 

27 

191 

4 


336 

122 
4 
1 

"29 

21 

147 

12 


400 

152 
5 

1 

"60 

20 

159 

3 


372 


c. Results- 
Deaths 


112 


Loss of limb . . ... 





Loss of finger or toe 


1 


Spinal injuries 

Fracture or dislocation 


49 


Sprains 

Cuts and bruises 


16 
182 




11 






Totals 


442 


336 


400 


372 







164 



Year Book 



VI. ACCIDENTS AND CASUALTIES— Continued 
(3) Employes 





Year Ending 
June 30, 1918 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1919 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1920 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1920 


a. Employment— 
Conductors. 


132 
131 
279 
769 

29 
300 

67 


79' 

85 
152 
544 

18 
153 

39 


126 
113 
215 
671 

24 
158 

33 


102 


Enginemen . . 

Firemen . 


86 
175 


Brakemen (road and yard) .- 

Mechanics 

Laborers 

Miscellaneous 


505 

5 

122 

23 


Totals 

b. Causes— 
Coupling and uncoupling . .... 


1,707 

71 
156 

57 

160 

2 

120 

58 

92 
8 

93 
162 
728 


1,070 

47 

63 

36 

121 

1 

56 

41 

49 

6 

39 

100 

511 


1,340 

58 
85 
45 
154 

61 
48 
54 
12 
57 
125 
641 


1,016 
51 


Collisions 

Derailments 


62 
38 
118 


Caught in frogs and switches 


1 
71 


Defective tools and appliances 


25 




28 




5 




26 


Fell from car 


97 




494 






Totals 


1,707 

121 

19 

12 

6 

129 

424 

930 

50 

16 


1,070 

58. 

10 

10 

1 

104 

257 

560 

30 

40 


1,340 

62 

16 

14 

9 

136 

366 

676 

44 

17 


1,016 


c. Results — 
Death. . . . . . 


45 




13 


Loss of finger or toe 


12 




8 


Fracture or dislocation 


98 




304 


Cuts and bruises 


484 




36 


Miscellaneous 


24 






Totals. . 


1,707 


1,070 


1,340 


1,016 







(4) Trespassers 



a. Location^- 

On track 

On train 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 

b. Results — 

Deaths 

Loss of limb 

Loss of finger or toe. . . . 

Spinal injuries 

Fractures or dislocation 

Sprains 

Cuts and bruises 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 



155 

38 
26 



219 



126 
24 
12 

"is 

4 
35 



219 



105 



105 



109 



109 



(5) Licensees 



a. location — 
On passenger trains ... 

On freight trains 

On station grounds, etc 

Totals 



28 



29 



35 



Public Service Commission 



165 



VI. ACCIDENTS AND CASUALTIES-Continued 





Year Ending 
June 30, 1918 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1919 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1920 


Year Ending 
Sept. 30. 1921 


b. Cause- 
CoUisions 


7 

2i 


7 
3 
19 


2 

2 

31 


2 


Derailoient . . . . 







25 






Totals 


28 

1 
1 

"5 
19 
2 


29 

4 

1 
1 
5 
15 
3 


35 

5 

.... 

16 
9 
4 


27 


c. Results— 
Deaths.. 


2 



Loss of finger or toe 





Cuts and bruises 


6 
11 


Fractures or dislocation 


8 


Totals 


28 


29 


35 


27 



B. Total Casualties on All Steam Railroads 



{1) Deaths- 



Travelers on highway , 
Employes 



Totals 

(2) Injuries — 



Travelers on highway 

Employes 

Trespassers 

Licensees 



Totals. 



175 

121 

126 

1 



432 

129 

261 

1,586 

93 

27 



2,096 



122 
58 
54 
4 



244 



97 

214 

1,012 

51 

35 



1,399 



9 
152 
62 
59 

5 



287 



100 

248 

,278 

50 

25 



1,701 



37 
112 
45 

87 
2 



277 



172 

260 

971 

70 

25 



C. Total Casualties on All Electric Railroads 



(1) Deaths— 
Passengers 


4 
51 
10 
13 

1 


9 
41 

8 

7 


6 
54 

2 
10 


3 


Travelers on highway 

Emnloves . . ... 


68 
6 




9 




1 






Totals 


79 

34 
33 
17 

2 


65 

21 

32 

13 

3 


72 

53 
19 
8 
1 


87 


{2) Injuries— 
Passengers 


21 


Travelers on highway 

Employes 

Trespassers 

Licensees 


28 
8 
2 
1 






Totals 


86 


70 


81 


61 







D. Total Casualties on AH Steam and Electric Railroads 



il) Deaihs- 
Steam roads 


432 
89 


244 
65 


287 
72 


277 




87 






2 Totals 

P (2) Injuries- 

Steam roads 


511 

2,096 
86 


309 

1,399 
70 


359 

1,701 

81 


364 
1,498 


Electric 


61 


Totals 


2,182 


1,469 


1,782 


1.559 


Grand totals 


2,693 


1,778 


2,141 


1,923 







166 



Year Book 



TABLE Vn. OPERATING STATIS 
Calendar 



Name of Eailwat 



Beech Grove Traction Co 

Chicago, South Bend and Northern Ind. Ry 

Central Indiana Lighting Co 

Chicago, Lake Shore and South Bend Ry 

Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg and Aurora Elec. Street Ry. 

Evansville, Suburban and Newburgh Ry. Co 

Evansville and Ohio Valley Railway Co 

Fort Wayne and Decatur Traction Co 

Ft. Wayne and Northwestern Railway Co 

Lafayette Service Company 

French Lick and West Baden Railway Co 

Gary and Southern Traction Co ' 

Gary and Hobart Traction Co 

Gary and Valparaiso Railway 

Gary Street Railway Co 

Hammond, Whiting and East Chicago Ry. Co 

Indianapolis and Cincinnati Traction Co 

Indianapolis and Louisville Traction Railway Co 

Indianapolis Street Railway Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co 

Indiana Utilities Company 

Interstate Public Service Company 

Lebanon-Thorntown Traction Co 

Louisville and Northern Railway and Lighting Co. . . . 

Louisville and Southern Indiana Traction Co 

Marion-Bluffton Traction Co 

Madison Light and Railway Co 

Ohio Electric Railway Co 

Southern Indiana Gas and Electric Co., Evansville . . . 

Southern Michigan Railway Co 

Terre Haute, Indianapolis and Eastern Traction Co . . 

Union Traction Company 

Vincennes Traction Co 

Washington Street Railway 

Winona Interurban Railway Co 

Indiana Service Corporation 

Lafayette Service Company 



Total. 



Operating Revenues 



Trans- 
portation 



$43,459 52 
1,206,748 22 

16,786 35 
901,326 89 
175,928 98 
358,722 51 
460,968 91 

97,750 06 
298,997 41 
127,376 61 



62,884 37 



115,936 17 
842,831 50 
632,398 08 
754,131 22 
274,139 01 
,809,986 68 
452,893 81 



756,143 48 
15,631 67 
286,726 55 
554,700 73 
115,372 84 



Other 

Railway 

Operations 



S93 00 

38,101 37 
1,715 01 

23,483 73 
520 17 

13,685 50 
8,586 07 
1,234 00 

13,845 

81,840 40 



169 95 



1,317 85 
35,200 71 

1,165 00 

11,520 81 

12,305 15 

556,377 50 

3,424 19 



11,407 63 
99 97 

3,094 26 
15,455 91 

1,911 39 



1,083 107 59 
940,083 04 
332,033 51 

1,348,100 67 

3,977,393 92 
80,850 20 
20,374 95 
309,642 64 

1,985,861 40 
127,376 61 



Total 



$43,552 52 
1,244,849 59 

18,501 36 
924,810 62 
176,449 15 
372,408 01 
469,554 98 

98,984 06 
312,843 27 
209,217 01 



63,054 32 



117,254 02 
878,032 21 
633,563 08 
765,652 03 
286,444 16 
5,366,364 18 
456,318 00 



767,551 11 
15,731 64 
289,820 81 
570,156 64 
117,284 23 



29,566,666 10 1,368,037 30 



137,279 75 

22,909 37 

2,315 41 

76,884 99 

118,361 35 

595 92 

390 95 

12,928 29 

77,975 44 

81,840 40 



220 
962, 
334, 
424, 
095, 
81, 
20, 
322, 
,063, 



387 34 
992 41 
348 92 
985 66 
755 27 
446 12 
765 90 
570 93 
836 84 
217 01 



30,934,703 40 



tDeficit. 



Public Service Commission 



167 



TICS OF ELECTRIC RAILROADS 
Year 1920 



Operating Expenses 


Net Opera- 














Power 


Equipment 


Way and 
Structure 


Conducting 
Transporta- 
tion and 
Traffic 


General 

and 

Miscellaneous 


Taxes 


Total 

(Including 

Taxes) 


ting Revenue 

(Deducting 

Tax; 


$9,844 02 


$3,016 39 


$6,033 50 


$14,848 58 


$9,761 92 


$2,285 42 


$45,789 83 


tS2,237 31 


158,565 32 


120,517 24 


124,253 02 


395,580 12 


80,593 47 


55,108 6] 


934,617 78 


310,231 81 


3,106 02 


2,646 62 


3,577 60 


5,954 24 


1,947 19 


349 9J 


17,581 65 


919 71 


165,513 07 


133,653 85 


131,651 76 


279,194 19 


108,492 62 


54,000 00 


872,505 49 


52,305 13 


16,376 61 


8,169 84 


26,173 81 


54,470 59 


16,403 89 


10,348 28 


131,943 02 


44,506 13 


19,895 29 


75,356 09 


77,583 74 


102,171 15 


34,419 17 


9,619 61 


319,045 05 


53,362 96 


60,231 16 


62,996 36 


77,977 28 


114,730 93 


62,232 85 


10,306 87 


388,475 45 


81,079 53 


14,659 74 


5,211 98 


21,141 00 


15,981 81 


16,893 67 


4,176 01 


78,064 21 


20,919 85 


73,756 53 


13,940 29 


39,072 65 


55,594 94 


40,201 68 


15,580 16 


238,146 25 


74,697 02 


105,743 41 


8,814 09 


22,548 28 


62,657 72 


13,887 76 


7,980 60 


221,631 86 


112,414 85 


12,050 44 


8,854 84 


8,666 97 


19,242 76 


4,423 97 




53,238 98 


9 815 34 








24,321 47 


7,871 55 


12,515 17 


35,254 23 


16,079 69 


6,702 11 


102,744 22 


14,509 80 


123,977 08 


84,526 07 


37,121 43 


286,809 67 


115,493 01 


27,736 12 


675,663 38 


202,368 83 


60,899 34 


81,417 01 


89,202 83 


240,011 85 


60,401 65 


48,250 14 


580,182 82 


53,380 26 


174,814 56 


75,040 79 


121,464 22 


129,294 47 


92,266 19 


31,912 49 


624,792 72 


140,859 31 


56,681 98 


18,419 28 


34,976 01 


47,415 14 


25,408 96 


15,000 00 


197,901 37 


88,542 79 


1,026,341 75 


563,347 60 


524,858 92 


1,545,408 94 


407,925 99 


504,509 60 


4,572,392 80 


793,971 38 


65,683 34 


46,502 59 


35,473 72 


110,640 63 


34,606 48 


52,371 24 


345,278 00 


111,040 00 


75,343 15 


37,372 U 


77,476 95 


140,919 71 


81,165 95 


47,200 00 


459,477 90 


308,073 21 


1,668 52 


787 44 


951 33 


5,448 23 


407 89 


720 00 


9,983 41 


5,748 23 


26,482 55 


23,125 21 


35,666 71 


81,150 18 


125,383 35 


7,547 73 


299,355 73 


19,534 92 


52,449 92 


39,319 45 


56,651 12 


164,072 37 


112,096 47 


21,815 29 


446,404 62 


123,752 02 


20,628 86 


5,218 23 


36,377 86 


25,931 29 


12,303 65 


8,395 39 


108,855 28 


8,428 95 


1,078,147 49 


299,056 63 


597,411 17 


1,175,325 15 


371,710 68 


253,524 30 


3,775,175 42 


445,211 92 


97,046 61 


74,403 86 


129,262 74 


311,437 98 


81,629 60 


72,235 13 


766,015 92 


196,976 49 


34,199 04 


22,691 66 


32,583 30 


55,807 57 


66,293 96 


18,466 91 


230,042 44 


104,306 48 


737,800 68 


315,150 92 


694,274 14 


962,012 30 


450,438 40 


282,012 48 


3,441,688 92 


983,296 74 


752,823 74 


411,028 61 


531,422 35 


856,580 01 


397,950 20 


211,434 35 


3,161,239 26 


934,516 01 


7,584 06 


4,964 02 


9,870 64 


17,062 11 


14,923 77 


1,320 54 


55,725 14 


25.720 98 


2,292 29 


3,630 53 


1,208 81 


7,973 29 


840 72 


764 38 


16,710 02 


4,055 88 


85,969 64 


25,589 78 


50,260 24 


83,265 99 


28,065 09 


13,463 18 


286,613 92 


35,957 01 


354,761 42 


156,114 33 


390,479 26 


555,462 89 


189,974 02 


136,851 32 


1,783,643 24 


280,193 60 


105,743 41 


8,814 09 


22,548 28 


62,657 72 


13,887 76 


7,980 60 


221,631 86 


tl2,414 85 


5,605,402 51 


2,747,569 38 


4,060,736 81 


5,020,368 75 


3,088,511 67 


1,939,968 84 


25,462,557 96 


5,472,145 44 



168 



Year Book 



TABLE VIII. OPERATING STATIS 

Calendar 

- CLASS "A." ELEC 



Location 



Name of Utility 



Gross Operating Revenues 



Commercial 



Municipal 



Other Public 
Utilities and 
Miscellaneous 



Total 



Anderson . . . 
Fort Wayne. 
Huntington . 
Logansport . 

Marion 

Mishawaka . 

Peru 

Richmond. . 



Aurora 

Whiting 

Hammond 

Lafayette 

Michigan City. 
East Chicago. . 

Elkhart 

Mishawaka . . . 
South Bend. . . 

Elwood 

Marion 

Muncie 

Evansville . . . . 
Fort Wayne. . . 

Gary 

Gary 

Huntington . . . 

Indianapolis. . . 
Indianapolis... 
Jeffersonville . . 
New Albany . . 

Kokomo 

Laporte 

Logansport 

Terre Haute . . 

Vincennes 

Williams 

Bedford 

Columbus. . . . 
Bloomington . . 
Shelbyville. . . . 
New Castle . . . 



(Municipally Owned) 

Municipal Light and Power Plant . . 

Municipal Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant. . . . 
Municipal Electric Light Plant. . . . 
Municipal Electric Light Plant .... 
Municipal Electric Light and Power 
Manicipal Electric Light and Power 



(Privately Owned) 



Interstate Public Service Co. . . 
No. Indiana Gas and Electric Co 
No. Indiana Gas and Electric Co 
No. Indiana Gas and Electric Co 
No. Indiana Gas and Electric Co 
No. Indiana Gas and Electric Co 
Indiana and Michigan Elec. Co . 
Indiana and Michigan Elec. Co . 
Indiana and Michigan Elec. Co . 

Indiana General Service Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Evansville Public Utilities Co. . . 
Ft. Wayne and No.Ind. Traction Co. 

Calumet Electric Co 

Gary Heat, Light and Water Co. 
Huntington Light and Fuel Co. 

(Combined) 

Indianapolis Light and Heat Co 

Merchants Heat and Light Co 

United Gas and Electric Co 

United Gas and Electric Co 

Indiana Railways and Light Co ... . 

Laporte Gas and Electric Co 

Logansport Utilities Co 

Terre Haute, Indpls. and Eastern 

Tract. Co 

Indiana Power Co. Combined Report 

Southern Ind. Power Co 

Southern Ind. Power Co 

Central Ind. Lighting Co 

Central Ind. Lighting Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 



$388,968 65 
338,407 69 



$108,442 43 



$143 00 
8,466 40 



$389,111 65 
455,316 52 



256,998 20 



22,472 57 



798 07 



280,268 84 



93,674 10 
124,224 43 
343,465 12 



24,820 48 



5,782 32 
21,177 32 
21,782 23 



3,157 37 



12,603 72 
23,860 23 



99,456 42 
158,005 47 
389.107 58 



27,977 85 



1,356,949 
367,663 07 
225,906 42 



88,226 92 
17,332 09 
28,496 75 



47,808 16 
4,596 80 
35,281 07 



,492,984 16 
389,591 96 
289,684 24 



See Combin 

See Combin 

1,576,492 39 

See Combin 

See Combin 

1,474,560 04 

628,799 25 

833,350 69 

5,001 30 

505,619 19 

205,352 28 
2,894,708 61 
1,386,847 80 

} 244.279 69 

•518,049 51 

200,546 10 

37,481 80 

763,565 50 
453,447 82 

} 161,903 88 

92,943 71 
113,435 30 

88,269 90 
120,586 23 



ed Report — 
ed Report — 
97,962 89 
ed Report- 
ed Report — 
69,355 13 
50,240 42 
12,452 27 
2,621 28 
48,091 17 

1,821 50 

4,106 35 

238,535 88 

30,231 90 

30,584 27 
33,256 71 



South Bend. 
South Bend. 

454,181 24 

Muncie. 

Muncie. 

115,045 41 

39,811 70 

17,203 11 

159,815 52 

629,00 

8,363 74 

11,373 77 

876,071 35 

66,196 06 

4,815 84 
3,268 24 



2,128,636 52 



63,707 07 
39,389 53 

14,063 16 



20,928 22 
121,416 15 

76,367 61 

12,789 01 



9,450 14 
13,861 62 



,658,960 58 
718,851 37 
863,006 07 
167,438 10 
554,339 36 

215,537 52 
,910,188 73 
,501,455 03 

340,707 65 

553,449 62 
237,071 05 
37,481 80 

848,200 79 
614,253 50 

252,334 65 

105,732 72 
122,885 44 
102,131 52 
120,586 23 



tDeficit. 
*Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



169 



tics or PUBLIC utilities 

Year 1920 

TRIG UTILITIES 



Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 
Revenue 


Power 


Transmission 
Storage and 
Distribution 


Consumption 

and 
Commercial 


General and 
Undistribu- 
ted 


Depreciation 

and 
Contigencies 


Taxes 


Total 


1263, 103 83 


$12,078 39 
22,171 23 


$12,039 74 
58,953 30 


$28,400 69 
39,007 63 


$24,877 92 
6,000 00 




$340,500 57 
391,259 45 


$48 611 08 


265,127 29 




64,057 07 






213,732 34 


16,323 14 


14,853 03 


29,741 43 


21,167 24 




295,817 18 


115,548 34 






33,486 62 
120,936 48 


9,425 97 
11,399 90 
7, 773 59 

2,861 08 


5,242 19 

2,785 82 
13,097 50 

953 28 


6,859 15 
15,563 89 
16,268 44 

2,353 24 


10,995 94 

7, 120 23 

27,044 57 

*464 40 




66,009 87 
157,806 32 
398,061 06 

17,686 65 


33,446 55 
199 15 


333,876 96 




18,953 48 
10,291 20 


10,462 45 


$1,521 00 


740 028 97 


90,652 52 
23,454 38 
20,464 10 


91,524 21 
21,271 87 
13,638 64 


38,627 84 
13,150 18 
11,347 16 




53,095 26 
15,907 57 
19,524 57 


1,013,928 80 
418,804 97 
254,748 07 


479 055 36 


345,020 97 




129,213 01 
34,936 17 


189 773 60 








806,087 03 

713,952 84 
236,841 41 
430,818 67 
102,333 01 


152, 170 21 

111,559 66 
44,181 63 
45,608 19 
9,530 31 
37,063 74 

5,891 65 
176,584 84 
84,258 82 

30,478 60 

18,639 79 

6, 130 53 

106 12 

114,757 68 
36,754 42 

16,085 25 

4,286 75 
3,881 16 
2,994 30 
5,291 04 


112,171 41 

106, 106 79 
37,568 54 
49,662 12 


202,543 32 

79,958 62 
25,593 15 
66,332 37 
8, 797 64 
53,844 17 

25,230 52 
156,429 77 
181,861 43 

26,960 21 

38,981 85 

28, 103 86 

2,349 87 

132,724 56 
77,198 17 

14, 174 96 

7.252 04 
8,497 50 

9.253 84 
9,405 51 


140,000 00 

47, 194 83 
72,000 00 
60,000 00 
13,090 58 
38,269 47 

20,006 40 
410,473 55 


173,436 37 

145,177 85 
79,329 94 
50,064 82 
3,600 00 
75,492 00 

9,157 35 
209,543 73 
186,574 81 


1,586,408 34 

1,203,950 59 
495,514 67 
702,486 17 
137,351 54 
311,718 88 

208,969 68 
2,472,812 15 
1,968,300 36 

282,896 45 

330,889 74 
206,774 73 
59,202 16 

676,135 14 
464,186 89 

241,953 58 

89,121 55 
88,409 38 
72,820 90 
84,747 89 


542,228 18 

455,009 99 
223,336 70 
160,519 90 
30,086 56 


86,498 87 

143,625 23 
1,335,217 03 
1,329,623 39 


20,550 63 

5,058 53 
184,563 23 
185,981 91 

21,916 82 

17,848 30 

7,703 30 

121 98 

56,176 90 
19,344 52 

3,835 79 

3,325 92 
8,822 41 
6,429 08 
6,375 59 


242.620 48 

6,567 84 
437,376 58 
533 154 67 


201,776 57 


1,764 25 


57,811 20 


255,419 80 




222,559 88 


144, 115 25 
54,616 90 

342,229 90 


11,649 68 
1,680 00 


9,072 11 
327 29 

30,246 10 
10,943 37 

9,800 00 

4,820 00 
10,833 00 
11,136 00 

4,380 00 


30,296 32 
21,720 36 

172,065 65 


231,546 40 

204,684 15 

67,268 47 
57,841 77 
48,399 44 
62,446 09 


88,400 01 

*6,626 57 

2,168 37 
*1,466 46 
*5,391 76 
*3,150 34 


150,066 61 

10,381 07 

16,611 17 
34,476 06 
39,310 62 
35,838 34 



170 



Year Book 









VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calenda*" 

CLASS "B." 




Name of Utility 


Gross Operating Revenues 


Location 


Commercial 


Municipal 


Other Public 
Utilities and 
Miscellaneous 


Total 


Attica 


(Municipally Owned 

Municipal Light and Water Plant. . 

Municipal Water and Elec. Light 

Works 


S41,367 13 

56,997 91 
52,819 07 
40,798 72 
109,468 79 


$10,228 85 

5,069 60 

6,475 61 

903 07 

15,834 50 


$761 00 

97,75 
17,096 79 


$52 356 98 








62 165 26 


Bluffton 


Municipal Water, Light & Power Plant 

Municipal Elec. Light Dept 

Municipal Elec. Light & Power Dept. 
Decatur Light & Power Plant 


76,391 47 


Columbia City . . . 


41,701 79 


Crawfordsville 

Decatur 


8,955 70 


134,258 99 


Frankfort 

Garrett . . . 


Municipal City Light & Power Co. . 
Municipal Water & Elec. Light Dept. 


165,295 85 
34,159 71 


20,685 77 
1,979 39 


515 14 


186,496 76 
36,139 10 


Gas City 






Goshen . . 


Municipal Elec. Plant & Water Wks. 
Municipal Elec. Light & Power Plant 
Municipal Elec. Light Dept. 


22,123 60 
28,457 97 


11,153 96 
3,093 54 




33,277 56 


Greenfield 




31,551 51 


Kendallville 






Lawrenceburg 

Linton 






. 






Munic. Elec. Light & Power Dept. . 


39,606 92 
150 00 


4,009 58 
9,110 00 




43,616 50 






9,260 00 


Mitchell 


Municipal Elec. Light Plant 






New Castle 


Municipal Water & Light Plant 

Municipal Elec. Light Plant 


308 8i 
63,253 22 


7,513 91 
11,034 32 




7,822 72 


Portland 


2,976 40 


77,263 94 


Rushville 




TeUCity 

Tipton 


Tell City Elec. Light Dept 

Tipt9n Electric Light Dept 


19,521 26 
46,956 96 
47,295 09 


3,918 85 
5,158 12 
5,838 21 


25 40 
8, 180 92 
2,639 51 


23,465 51 
60,296 00 




55,772 81 


Alexandria 


(Privately Owned) 
Indiana General Service Co 
















Gas City 

Hartford City. . . . 
Bedford 


Indiana General Service Co 




















Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Boonville Elec. Light & Power Co. . 
T. H. I. & E. Traction Co 


72,813 25 
64,392 12 
42,000 91 
27, 107 96 


9,464 24 
17,318-83 
8,107 31 
2,817 55 




82,277 49 


Lebanon 




81,710 95 


Seymour. .... 


9,992 05 
207 87 


60,100 27 


Boonville 

Brazil . 


30, 133 38 


W. Terre Haute 


T. H I & E. Traction Co 










Clinton 


Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (System). . 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (Clinton). 
Wabash VaUey Elec. Co. (Suburban) 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (SuUivan) . 
Hydro-Elec. Light & Power Co. . . . 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Hawks Electric Co. (Goshen) 

Hawks Electric Co. (System) 

Putnam Electric Co 


234,215 39 

197,332 01 
38,422 13 
80, 194 32 

134,547 32 

48, 629 37 

27,867 90 

See General 


22,400 42 

13,632 14 
5,226 74 


26,035 39 
10,139 05 




Clinton 


282,651 20 


Clinton 






Connersville 

Franklin 


221,103 20 
43,648 87 


Goshen. . 


335 84 
32,222 60 


80,530 16 




8,699 60 

6,543 60 

10,288 00 

Report— Clin 


175,469 52 




55,172 97 


Greensburg 

Jason ville. . 


Greensburg Gas & Elec. Co 

Wabash Valley Elec. Co 


19 83 
ton. 

14,769 26 

2,082 34 

4,742 92 

199 51 


38,175 73 


Seymour 


Jackson County Transmission Co 


14,769 26 


Madison. 


Madison Light & Railways Co 

MartinsviUe Gas & Elec. Co 

Mt. Vernon Elec. Lt. & Power Co. . 
Noblesville Heat Light & Power Co. 
Plymouth Elec. Tnght & Power Co. 
Princeton Elec. Light & Power Co. 
United Public Service Co 


54,011 63 
45, 196 09 
31,798 24 
131,783 07 
78,082 34 
67,429 08 
72, 105 54 
49,925 15 
87, 193 27 


10,165 52 


66,259 49 




49,939 01 


Mt. Vernon 


7,813 68 
11,636 77 
13,630 30 

7,826 51 
11,998 90 

6,109 92 

4,658 34 


39,811 43 
143,419 84 


Plymouth 


19,254 78 


110,967 42 
75,255 59 




9,690 50 
7,538 52 


93,794 94 




Union City Electric Co 


63,573 59 


Valparaiso 

Valparaiso 

Wabash 


Vfl.lpflraisn Tiipht.inp Co 


91,851 61 


Mutual Liffht Heat & Power Co 






Wabash Water & Light Co 

Winona Elec. Light & Water Co. . 
Citizens Heat Light & Power Co. . 
Liberty Light & Power Co 


125,984 98 
74,770 56 
35,862 93 
42,591 55 


10,258 97 
9,110 38 
3,298 00 
6, 196 00 


1,381 72 
5,463 90 


137,625 67 


Warsaw 


89,344 84 




39,160 93 


Liberty 


10,719 21 


59,506 76 








♦Credit. 
fDeficit. 













Public Service Commission 



171 



OF PUBLIC utilities— Continued 

Year 1920 

ELECTRIC 



Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 
lievenue 


Power 


Transmission 
Storage and 
Distribution 


Consumption 

and 
Commercial 


General and 
Undistribu- 
ted 


Depreciation 

and 
Contingencies 


Taxes 


Total 


$34,165 11 

41,069 54 
40,569 84 
45, 138 16 
76,333 24 


$2,373 94 

2, 624 04 
3,202 77 
3,026 55 
2,854 33 


$1,522 13 

860 37 
1,044 04 
1,055 38 
2,823 31 


$3,374 59 

1,532 24 
8,177 90 
2,612 02 
13,411 39 






$41,435 77 

52,538 26 
60,696 05 
51,832 11 
108,422 27 


$10,921 21 
9 627 00 


$6,452 07 
7,701 50 






15,695 42 




tlO 130 32 


13,000 00 




25,836 72 






102,319 64 
20,626 67 


12,216 51 
1,217 56 


3,845 35 
1,639 39 


13,022 58 
2,853 21 


111,055 50 




142,459 58 
26,336 83 


44,037 18 




9,802 27 






14,666 90 
33, 176 88 


2,303 88 
1,338 24 


1,705 39 
367 69 


4,682 92 
680 47 


5,105 77 
1,606 50 




28,464 86 
37,169 78 


4,812 70 
t5,618 27 























25,383 63 
6,586 84 


2,133 80 

739 78 


1,026 77 


4,286 35 
15 93 






32,830 55 
7,342 55 


10,785 95 
1,917 45 














9,512 74 
68,838 42 


352 46 
5,776 01 


1,537 72 
682 37 


616 72 
4,545 78 


890 64 




12,910 28 
79,842 58 


t5,087 56 
t2,578 64 










22,770 11 
50,442 61 
43,687 70 


2,506 43 
2,305 84 
1,242 18 


1,123 91 

1,968 98 
2,021 21 


2,358 34 
1,803 63 
4,713 36 


3,473 00 
2,990 16 




32,231 79 
59,511 22 
51,664 45 


t8,766 28 




784 78 




4, 108 36 

























































40,325 76 
81,692 82 
33,613 96 
12,436 63 


6,768 91 
3,055 58 
3,299 23 
3,126 91 


5,820 10 

3,560 34 

2,707 65 

694 28 


9,003 47 
8,707 32 
5,907 49 
5,786 58 


*2,953 05 
*2,100 23 
*1,460 63 
2,589 33 


$7,920 00 
3,575 20 
5,292 00 
3,803 99 


66,885 19 
98,491 03 
49.359 70 
28,437 82 


15,392 30 

116,780 08 

10,740 57 

1,695 56 


















113,067 27 

143,587 28 
18,676 66 
49,095 39 
97,890 38 
24,214 35 
15,731 24 

9,982 05 
43,815 60 
32,297 90 
28,509 31 
98,935 76 
54,218 28 
40,553 84 
51,876 44 
20, 164 18 
35,281 06 


13,845 81 

4,367 26 
3,530 23 
2,881 92 
7,969 60 
4,529 91 
1,249 54 


21,013 82 

7,683 43 
2,570 53 
10,990 05 
15,215 28 


44,550 57 

26,964 10 
4,517 19 
16,169 38 
32,239 85 
8,890 82 
3,578 89 

600 00 
10,294 01 

5,674 72 

3,275 09 
18,441 54 
17,023 50 

9,243 40 
16,403 55 
10,227 78 

7,229 54 


32,954 10 

17,209 96 
*1,197 27 
4,748 18 
17, 929 44 
5,851 16 
5,129 16 

950 00 


15,075 00 

7,591 82 
2,610 00 
2,959 82 
7,999 92 
1,800 00 
1,626 07 

213 82 
1,553 82 
2,277 56 
3,204 71 
7, 192 25 
6,651 80 
5,040 39 
4,285 65 
2,168 43 
3,468 15 


240,506 57 

207,403 85 
30,707 34 
86,844 74 

179,244 47 
45,286 24 
28,887 30 

11,745 87 
59,893 87 
48,095 82 
41,996 30 
147,697 90 
97,673 67 
63,841 69 
85,234 13 
48,672 67 
52,800 09 


42,144 63 

13,699 35 
12,941 53 
16,314 58 
13,774 95 
9,886 73 


1,572 40 


9,288 43 
3,023 39 


1,408 17 
3,257 47 
1,248 62 
5,758 24 
2,783 09 
2,880 23 
3,795 29 
5,442 60 
3,653 05 


2,822 27 
• 1,046 17 
3,333 39 
7,167 76 
3,497 00 
2,703 83 
3,273 20 
1,236 31 
3,039 77 


6,365 62 


3,542 00 
2,425 18 
10,202 35 
13,500 00 
3,420 00 
5, 600 00 
9,433 37 
128 52 


1,843 19 
12,184 87 
t4,278 06 
13,293 75 
11,413 90 

8,560 81 
14,900 92 
39,051 52 


102,348 03 
62,560 76 
16,554 09 
23.725 23 


5,714 22 
3,072 82 
3,329 02 
11,897 78 


5,134 20 

1,474 35 

879 26 

781 56 


19, 676 55 
12,743 52 
3,822 63 
12,360 95 




12,286 55 
2,500 13 
2,443 97 
2,015 58 


145, 159 55 
87,455 62 
39,255 16 
55,081 10 


17,533 88 


5,104 04 
12,226 19 
4,300 00 


1,889 22 

194 23 

4,425 66 



172 



Year Book 



VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

CLASS "A.*' 





Name of Utility 


Gross Operating Revenues 


Location 


Commercial 
Industrial 
and Power 


Residuals 
(Net) 


Other 
Utilities 
Municipal- 
ties and 
Miscellaneous 


Total 


Anderson 


Central Indiana Gas Co 


$279,402 75 






$279,402 75 


East Chicago 

Elkhart . . . 


Northern Ind Gas & Elec Co 






Elk-hart Gas ariH Fhp.I C,n 


194,514 98 

63,222 20 

375,504 50 

783,201 13 

342,741 33 

531,168 80 

96,499 29 

1,876,655 27 

60,459 61 

213,213 60 

234,940 99 

115,163 12 

171,633 45 

236,971 34 

156,277 87 


$89,035 59 

22,651 33 

153,407 04 

17,651 08 

2,751 58 

31,73 29 

41,600 73 

6,331,017 23 

28,920 89 


$3,501 56 


287 052 13 


Elwood 




85,873 43 


Evansville 


Public Utilities Co 


252 00 


539 163 54 


Ft. Wayne 


Nothern Ind. Gas & Elec. Co 

Gary Heat Light & Water Co 

Northern Ind. Gas & Elec. Co 

Hantmgton Light and Feul Co 

Citizens Gas Co 


800,852 21 


Gary 


629 44 
32,155 09 


346 122 35 


Hammond 

Huntington 


566,497 18 
138,100 02 


9,361 56 

227 27 


8,217,034 06 


Jeffersonville 


United Gas and Electric Co. 

Kokomo Gas and Fuel Co 

Northern Ind. Gas & Elec. Co ... . 

Laporte Gas and Electric Co 

Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 
Central Indiana Gas Co 


89,153 23 
213,213 60 




74,918 29 
20,997 16 




309,859 28 




472 33 


136,632 61 


Logansport 

Marion 


171,633 45 






236 971 34 


Michigan City 

Mishawaka 


Northern Ind. Gas & Elec. Co ... . 
Northern Ind Gas & Elec Co 


42,759 34 




199,037 21 










545,098 54 
119,036 71 


45,503 83 

51,688 14 

3,801 08 




590,602 37 


New Albany 

Peru 


United Gas and Electric Co 


69 97 
70,530 93 


170,794 82 
74,332 01 


Peru 


Peru Gas Co 


114,032 30 
229,369 24 
740,981 62 
408,640 05 
108,429 65 
221,800 55 


114,032 30 




Richmond Light Heat & Power Co. 

Northern Ind. Gas & Elec Co 

Citizens Gas & Fuel Co 




1,142 87 
585 45 


230,512 11 


South Bend 

Terre Haute 


15,022 13 


756,589 20 
408,640 05 


Vincennes 


Central States Gas Co 


43,421 29 


11,431 28 


193,282 22 






221,800 55 













tDeficit. 
♦Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



17J 



OF PUBLIC UTIIJTIES-Continued 

Year 1920 

GAS 



Operating Expenses 




ProductioD 


Distribution 


Commercial 


General and 
Undistribu- 
ted (Includ- 
ing Municipal 
Lighting) 


Depreciation 


Taxes 


Total 


Net. 
Operating 
Revenues 


$136,801 68 


$23,706 07 


$15,673 55 


$14,267 57 




$13,690 00 


$204,138 87 


$75,263 88 








204 979 98 


9,072 77 

9,^28 30 
48,413 38 
35,635 31 
26,903 31 
58,039 41 

6,032 57 
328,072 62 

6,312 23 
11,168 85 
17,776 95 

7,048 27 
12,188 37 
17,407 28 
13,868 47 


5,432 42 

3,860 89 
24,137 38 
52,427 73 

9,548 06 
44,926 56 

3,925 15 
105,214 64 

2,658 39 

6,779 90 
12,675 33 

2,641 08 
13,416 96 
10,822 67 
11,583 96 


21,363 48 

3,514 60 

27,255 87 

35,965 26 

43,070 46 

21,861 75 

13,334 16 

109,505 48 

6,277 43 

63,070 52 

9,110 37 

19,260 86 

19,323 98 

9,851 71 

7,521 47 




16,855 00 

6,086 57 

45,313 95 

37,834 82 

40,173 83 

32,258 77 

6,739 18 

314,875 22 


257,703 65 
83,629 29 
549,033 17 
735,810 67 
260,817 37 
563,239 88 
133,196 30 
7,551,287 64 
85,236 70 
201,688 22 
226,822 05 
114,237 63 
165,463 30 
190,162 03 
204,091 80 


29,348 48 
2 244 14 


60 538 93 




363,912 59 
573 947 55 


$40,000 00 


t9,869 63 
65,041 54 


111,846 75 
406 153 39 


29,274 96 


85,304 98 
3,257 30 


96,165 28 

6,469,075 27 

68 188 65 


6,999 96 

224,544 41 

1,800 00 

1,602 99 


4,903 72 

665,746 42 

3 916 53 


108,126 20 
172,033 53 


10,939 76 
15,225 87 
5,408 39 
8,955 48 
13,682 55 
13,219 64 


11,525 38 
83,037 23 


74,357 33 
111,578 51 


5,521 70 


22,394 98 
6,170 15 


138,397 82 




46,809 31 


157,898 26 




t5,054 59 








387,535 64 


36,077 27 
11,701 69 


20,894 32 
4,931 21 


19,019 91 
11,696 40 




34,171 84 


497,698 98 
J-62,307 32 
74,332 01 
96,275 72 
213.166 45 
618,726 03 
330,265 41 
204,051 51 
131,368 43 


92,903 39 


130,978 02 


3,000 00 


8,487 50 


74,332 01 






72,567 43 


3,494 50 
9,282 72 
63,871 20 
21,884 94 
9,989 28 
1,225 83 


9,958 91 
10,114 27 
59,056 56 
21,198 57 

6,405 35 
134 17 


4,206 10 
19,024 04 
20,843 83 
66,243 07 
25,127 50 
122 04 




6,048 78 
23,543 69 
29,217 25 
45,297 51 

9,375 10 
139 90 


17,756 58 


142,201 73 
445,737 19 


9,000 00 


17,345 66 
137,863 17 


147,141 32 
145,466 78 
129,746 49 


28,500 00 
7,687 50 


78,374 64 
t 10, 769 29 
90,432 12 









174 



Year Book 



VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

CLASS "B." GAS 



Location 



Name of Utility 



Gross Operating Revenues 



Commercial 
Industrial 
and Power 



Residuals 

(Net) 



Other 
Utilities 
Municipal- 
ities and 
Miscellaneous 



Total 



Alexandria . . . 

Aurora 

Auburn 

Bedford 

Bloomington. 

Bluffton 

Brazil 

Columbus 

Connersville. . 
Conners\'ille. . 
Fairmount . . . 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Greencastle. . . 

Greenfield 

Hartford City 
Kendallville . . 
Lawrenceburg 

Lebanon 

Linton 

Liberty 

Loogootee.. . . 

Madison 

Martinsville . . 
Middletown . . 
New Castle. . . 
Noblesville . . . 
Normal City . . 

Plymouth 

Princeton .... 
Riverside .... 

Rochester 

Selma 

Seymour 

ShelbyvUle... 

Tipton 

Union City. . . 
Valparaiso . . . 

Wabash 

Washington . . 

Warsaw 

Whiting 

Winchester. . . 
Suburban .... 
Rushville .... 
Crawfordsville 
Decatur 



tDeficit. 
♦Credit. 



Central Indiana Gas Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Indiana Fuel and Light Co 

Interstate Public Service Co . . 

Central Indiana Lighting Co 

Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 

Brazil Gas Co 

Columbus Gas Light Co 

Hydro-EIec. Light & Power Co.. . . 

Peoples Service Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co.. . 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Indiana Fuel and Light Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Goshen Gas Co 

Greencastle Gas and Elec. Co 

Interstate Public Service Co . . 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Indiana Fuel and Light Co 

Lawrenceburg Gas Co 

Northern Ind. Gas & Elec. Co 

Linton Gas Co 

Liberty Gas Light & Fuel Co 

Loogootee Gas Fuel Co 

Madison Light and Fuel Co 

Martinsville Gas and Elec. Co ... . 

Middletown Gas Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Indiana Gas Light Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 

Princeton Utilities Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Rochester Gas and Fuel Co. . , 

Selma Gas Co. 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Indiana Gas and Light Co 

Union Heat Light & Power Co 

Valparaiso Light Co 

Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 
Washington Water.Lt. & Power Co. 

Warsaw Gas Co 

Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 
Union Heat, Light and Power Co.. 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Rushville Natural Gas Co 

IJlorthern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 
Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 



$36,943 04 
8,268 82 

111,914 54 
31,828 23 
42,827 00 
46,977 71 
35,460 27 
60,135 67 



$12,396 96 

2,022 22 

35,727 76 

14,362 20 

12 00 



12,059 84 
18,628 48 



43,333 03 
12,186 22 
73,129 59 
15,182 56 



22,913 91 



1,951 14 
5,644 12 



69,822 65 
18,427 28 
22,171 96 
52,186 92 



25,114 18 
6,423 34 



10,675 99 
53,268 39 



2,338 



,408 18 



24,621 12 
19,433 30 
9,163 06 
65,928 26 
60,001 14 



9,818 40 
705 



26,987 98 
23,149 36 



121 85 



25,378 26 

1,511 66 

35,488 60 

43,957 67 



10,733 01 



17,312 41 

648 82 



56,828 90 
85,129 19 
25,591 44 
40,510 93 



22,027 70 



1,954 69 
23,871 81 



26,116 37 
72,250 74 
31,080 43 



42,264 02 



$97 55 



437 15 



28 05 
'56'75 



$49,340 00 
10,291 04 

147,642 30 
46,190 43 
42,839 00 
46,977 71 
47,520 11 
78,764 15 



66,246 94 
12,186 22 
75,080 73 
20,826 68 



94,936 83 
24,850 62 
22,171 96 
52,186 92 



13,014 07 
53,268 39 



9,505 73 



34.439 52 

19.440 35 
9,600 21 

65,928 26 
60,001 14 



27,109 83 
23,149 36 



36,111 27 

1,511 66 

52,801 01 

44,606 49 



78,884 65 
85,129 19 
27., 596 88 
64,382 74 



26,116 37 
114,514 76 
31,080 43 



Public Service Commission 



111 



OF PUBLIC utilities— Contmued 
Year 1920 

utilities 



Operating Expenses 




Production 


Distribution 


Commercial 


General and 
Undistribu- 
ted (Included 
in Municipal 
Lighting) 


Depreciation 


Taxes 


Total 


Net 
Operating 
Revenue 


$33,132 78 


$5,404 88 
630 30 
4,576 40 
3,049 54 
2,773 54 
9,387 19 
3,215 85 
2,849 17 


$2,235 45 
141 16 
3,363 91 
1,393 38 
1,793 10 
3,837 37 
118 74 
3,643 15 


$2,034 96 
678 81 

19,718 78 
3,410 40 
2,955 65 
5,554 79 
7,331 02 
7,605 71 




$3,331 17 
438 75 
7,951 78 
3,000 00 
3,768 00 
2,428 21 
5,795 41 
3,600 00 


$46,139 24 
11,607 09 

134,290 91 
56,633 63 
56,178 63 
46,607 01 
46,168 40 
71,813 01 


*3,200 76 
t 1,316 05 

13,351 39 

t 10, 443 20 

tl3,339 63 

370 70 


9,852 03 
92,863 93 
45,735 06 

45.398 41 

25.399 45 


*$133 96 

5,816 11 

45 25 

*510 07 


27,392 90 
50,644 43 


2,3i4 48 
3,470 55 


1,351 71 
6,951 14 


56,813 09 


2,269 46 

1,193 66 

4,497 51 

919 92 


381 66 
1,019 91 
6,503 37 

609 14 


6,456 66 

928 48 

4,294 24 

1,557 65 




918 52 
1,071 75 
6,257 66 

900 00 


66,839 39 
12,156 45 
63,804 12 
21,641 08 


t592 45 
29 77 


7,942 65 




42,251 34 




11,276 61 
t814 40 


17,846 04 


*191 67 


















91,814 33 
19,786 27 
13,531 98 
30,203 34 


3,739 49 
1,331 78 
2,013 23 
2,172 13 


1,996 48 

960 00 

1,373 37 

1,738 75 


10,151 46 
2,924 96 
2,732 75 
1,582 72 


2,220 00 
960 00 
195 43 


5,316 31 
1,195 78 
2,300 00 
1,826 22 


115,238 07 
27,158 79 
21,755 90 
37,523 16 


t20,301 24 

t2,308 17 

416 06 

14,663 76 







13,537 97 


554 78 
4,496 39 




1,045 88 
5,739 69 




108 61 
2,369 80 


15,247 24 
47,236 66 


t2,233 17 
6,031 73 


30,636 01 


3,994 77 








7,618 46 


1,017 59 


130 00 


722 11 




89 00 


9,577 16 


171 43 






22,572 35 
13,464 02 
4,766 22 


1,118 37 
571 49 
1,250 00 
2,612 66 
4,167 76 


226 37 
754 04 


5,236 53 
4,549 50 
2,444 00 
5,173 03 
9,275 69 


323 64 

858 48 


1,512 00 
1,129 28 
200 88 
2,409 00 
4,951 75 


30,989 26 
21,326 81 
8,661 10 
54,075 76 
63,403 55 


3,450 26 

11,886 46 

939 11 


42,502 79 
32,912 92 


3,110 97 
2,095 43 


*1,732 69 
10,000 00 


11,852 50 
t3,402 41 


16,337 11 


1,949 38 
506 54 


2,157 37 
409 55 


912 52 
3,468 34 




2,521 04 
1,548 45 


23,877 42 
24,679 52 


3,232 41 


16,448 64 


2,298 00 


tl,530 16 


24,331 83 


2,625 47 


710 56 


3,640 24 
1,474 00 
3,469 48 
3,988 73 


960 00 


1,760 50 


34,028 60 

1,474 00 

51,154 24 

45,644 35 


2,082 67 
37 66 


40,595 78 
33,867 09 


2,424 28 
2,245 56 


979 01 
1,444 86 


577 69 
*701 89 


3,108 00 
4,800 00 


1,646 77 
tl,037 86 


















57,704 01 
54,857 22 


4,521 71 
8,054 77 
2,161 81 
2,348 20 


2,209 10 

6,794 68 

823 69 

1,571 72 


5,157 68 
10,592 72 
2,385 25 
7,468 27 


170 88 


5,981 85 
4,438 17 
2,499 44 
2,973 82 


75,745 23 
84,737 56 
31,316 55 
71,806 36 


3,139 42 
391 63 


21,539 04 
56,144 35 


1,907 32 
1,300 00 


t3,719 67 
t7,423 62 















































19,565 54 
86,201 85 
33,326 44 


6,550 83 
28,312 91 


64,760 74 


5,852 98 
7,554 55 


5,946 51 
3,529 68 


3,6i3 76 
3,570 76 




6,027 86 
2,274 18 


16,397 27 




t2,246 01 









176 



Year Book 



VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

HOT WATER 



Gross Operating Revenues 



Location 


Name of Utilitt 


Commercial 


Municipal 


Miscellaneous 


Total 


Bedford 


Interstate Public Service Co 






















Boonville 


Boonville Elec. Light & Power Co. 

Crawfordsville Heating Co 

Indiana General Service Co 


$8,596 01 
56,255 50 






$8,596 01 








56,255 50 


Elwood 








Fowler 












Frankfort 


Frankfort Heating Co 


79,103 46 
154,864 19 
70,797 80 
56,204 32 






79,103 46 




Merchants Heat and Light Co ... . 
Northern Ind. Gas and Elec, Co. . . 

Laporte Gas and Electric Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 






154,864 19 


Lafayette 

Laporte 






70,797 80 
56,204 32 












Marion 


Indiana General Service Co 






















New Castle 


Interstate Public Service Co 

Peru Heating Co 


i2,839 28 
31,686 00 
13,839 37 
64,476 09 






12,839 28 


Peru 






31,686 00 


Princeton 


Princeton Light & Power Co. . : . . . 
Citizens Mutual Heating Co 






13,839 37 


Terre Haute 






64,476 09 











STEAM 



Anderson 

Batesville 

Columbia City 

Evansville 

Goshen 

Hope 

Huntington. . . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 

Kokomo 

Logansport. . . 
Martiusville. . 

Mooresville 

Muncie 

Noblesville. . . 
Rensselaer ... 

Rochester 

South Bend . . 
Terre Haute. . 
Thorntown — 
Warsaw 



Central Heating Co 

Batesville Elec. Light & Pr. Co.. . . 

Municipal Heating Plant 

Evansville Public Service Co 

Municipal Heating Plant 

Pulse & Porter Elec. Light Plant . . 
Huntington Light and Fuel Co. . . . 
Indianapolis Light and Heat Co. . . 
Merchants Heat and Light Co ... . 
Indiana Railway and Light Co. . . . 
Logansport Heat and Power Co . . . 
Martinsville Gas and Electric Co. . 

Mooresville Public Service Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Noblesville Heat, Light & Power Co. 
Municipal Heating Department. . 

United Public Service Co. 

St. Joseph Heating Co 

T. H. I. & E. Traction Co 

Municipal Heating Plant 

Winona Elec. Light & Water Co.. . 



$58,039 45 



51,971 00 

2,162 12 

449 02 

37, 626 "64 

187,106 93 

463,236 71 



55,467 78 



176,087 88 
15,478 81 



23,358 84 
81,417 82 



7,178 91 



$8,445 59 



12,563 40 
'236' is 



$58,039 45 



51,971 00 

2,162 12 

449 02 

46,072 23 

187,106 93 

463,236 71 



55,467 78 



188,651 28 
15,478 81 



23,594 99 
81,417 82 



7,178 91 



tDeficit. 
♦Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



177 



OF PUBLIC UTILITIES— Continued 

Year 1920 

HEATING 



I 



Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 
Jlevenue 


Station 
Expense 


Distribution 


Consumption 

and 
Commercial 


General and 
Undis- 
tributed 


Depreciation 

and 
Contingencies 


Taxes 


Total 


































$4,704 28 
41,481 72 


$115 11 
1,489 65 


$212 75 
132 10 


$i,084 39 
3,272 71 


$1,800 00 
3,500 00 


$1,442 76 
2.476 00 


19,359 29 
52,352 18 


t$763 28 
3,903 32 


















. 47,954 03 
126,483 08 
63,226 56 
33,233 00 


3,543 98 
6,298 69 
3,308 76 
1,394 28 


257 13 
6,575 38 
2,730 51 
1,080 87 


7,001 80 
12,209 10 
2,194 11 
4,593 25 


6,633 27 


3,307 80 
9,506 87 
1,785 51 
2,965 87 


68,698 01 
161,073 12 
73,245 45 
50,191 14 


10,405 55 
16,208 93 
t2,447 65 
6,013 18 


6,923 87 


































11,747 68 

25,323 73 

8 009 94 


412 46 

411 10 

964 17 

15 52 


659 90 
32 05 


1,097 32 
1,798 56 


*367 54 
2,000 00 
1,140 00 
9,328 00 


511 00 
2,688 50 
1,680 13 
1,843 23 


14,060 82 
32,253 94 
11,794 24 
61,578 95 


tl,221 .54 

t567 94 

2,045 13 

2,897 14 


44,490 75 


613 47 


5,287 98 



HEATING 



$44,109 07 


$2,006 71 


$5 60 


$5,716 43 


$5,933 76 


$972 00 


$58,743 57 


t$704 12 


















27,383 73 
5,858 36 


5,282 85 


2,338 16 


2,861 59 

839 44 


8,000 00 

530 84 

50 00 

3,274 20 

20,845 54 


6,148 75 


52,015 08 

7,228 64 

540 59 

48,409 59 

216,192 20 

371,230 78 


144 08 

15,066 52 

191 57 

12,337 36 

129,085 27 

92,005 93 


460 59 






30 00 

1,941 79 

8,990 73 

21,013 67 


38,453 68 
140,515 55 
317,680 34 


394 38 
8,417 13 
9,161 87 


603 55 
36,779 25 
11,262 66 


3,741 99 

644 00 

12,112 24 








51,417 98 


5,231 38 


968 62 


6,505 65 


2,520 00 


654 57 


67,298 20 


111.830 42 



















112,768 28 
10,637 12 


13,208 63 
476 09 


3,137 16 

220 28 


2,214 21 
1,799 89 


8,i26 7i 
1,247 35 


8,384 97 


147,833 96 
14,380 73 


40,817 32 
1,098 08 






13,080 59 
54,900 15 


1,138 99 
5,119 29 


585 25 
774 01 


3,969 67 
2,864 85 


2,000 00 
4,150 00 


1,071 41 
4,487 42 


21,845 91 
72,295 72 


1,749 08 
9,122 10 


i 
















( 6,44i 7i 


1,089 71 


30 57 


36 89 


450 73 


205 46 


8,255 07 


1,076 16 



12—19930 



178 



Year Book 



VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

CLASS "A." 



Location 



Name of Utilitt 



Gross Operating Revenues 



Exchange 



Toll 



Rentals Miscellaneous 



New York 

Hammond 

Terre Haute 

Kokomo 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

Wakarusa 

Ft. Wayne 

Indianapolis 

Lafayette 

Laporte 

Logansport 

Valparaiso 

(Toll Lines) .... 

Chesterton . . . 

Hobart 

Kouts 

Miller 

Wheeler 

Richmond 

Evansville 

Winchester 

Bluffton 

Knox 

Bryan, Ohio 

Louisville, Ky . . . . 

New Albany 1 

Sellersburg / 

Seymour 

Brazil 

Michigan City 

Chicago, 111 

Wabash 

South Bend 

Indianapolis 



American Tel. & Tel. Co 

Illinois Bell Tel. Co.(Ind.only) . . 
Citizens Independent Tel. Co . . . 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Home Tel.Co.of Elkhart County. 
Home Tel.Co.of Elkhart County. 
Home Tel.Co.of Elkhart County. 

Home Tel. and Tel. Co 

Indianapolis Tel. Co 

Lafayette Telephone Co 

Laporte Telephone Co 

Logansport Home Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind. Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind. Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind. Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind. Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind. Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind. Tel. Co 

Northwestern Ind Tel. Co 

Richmond Home Tel. Co 

Southern Tel. Co. of Indiana — 
The Eastern Indiana Tel. Co. . . 

United Telephone Co 

Winona Tel. Co. (Combined).. . . 

Williams County Tel. Co 

Independent Long Distance Tel. 
and Telegraph Co 

Louisville Home Tel. Co 



1485,558 71 

340,836 71 

Purchased by 

99,682 03 

43,731 57 



$38,136,456 57 

235,957 08 

20,479 24 

Indiana Bell 

11,095 11 

9,924 53 



$324 00 
1,110 00 
Telephone Co 
660 00 



$17,894,16835 

28,769 58 

4,668 10 

mpany 

1,077 75 
477 75 



388,398 88 
Purchased by 
173,238 16 
110,473 33 
106,646 58 
41,128 33 



8,276 25 
14,041 40 
3,977 55 



92,015 66 

Central Union 

1,771 38 

14,247 44 

17,428 36 

11,492 52 

876 03 

3,258 82 

4,394 77 

946 87 



3,030 50 

Telephone Co 

1,626 50 



11,549 85 

mpany 

1,469 60 
977 54 



2,394 92 

3 15 

308 74 

665 94 

195 42 



Southern Ind. Tel. & Teleg. Co.. 
Citizens Tel. Co. of Clay County. 

Merchants Mutual Tel. Co 

Central Union TeL Co 

Home Telephone Co 

South Bend Home Tel. Co 

Central Union TeL Co 



1,443 75 
115,521 42 
Purchased by 
74,335 67 
Purchased by 
73,783 98 
68,071 27 

6,572 30 

88,566 57 

67,118 18 

57,224 79 

67,724 26 

9,706,961 76 

62,599 84 

Purchased by 

Purchased by 



338 61 
19,871 78 

Indiana Bell 
28,865 81 

Indiana Bell 
23,235 88 
17,545 79 

88,066 04 
10,306 75 

8,692 57 
12,044 

8,130 36 
3,663,327 48 

9,519 65 
Indiana Bell 
Indiana Bell 



Telephone Co 



40 11 
54 21 



679 00 



Telephone Co 



600 00 
Telephone Co 
Telephone Co 



677 60 

1,389 91 

986 79 

362 00 
283 78 
138 36 
430,582 45 
711 46 

mpany 

mpany 



tDeficit. 



Public Sei^vice Commission 



179 



OF PUBLIC UTILITIES— Continued 

Year 1920 

TELEPHONE 





Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 
Revenue 


Total 


Maintenance 

and 
Depreciation 


Traffic 


Commercial 


General 

and 

Miscellaneous 


Taxes and 

Uncollectible 

Accounts 


Total 


$56,030,624 92 
693,070 21 
367,094 05 


$11,208,794 88 
304,132 70 
120,055 91 


$8,945,352 10 
221,610 19 
112,498 66 


$686,127 08 
82.870 86 
30,780 13 


$6,987,160 09 
24,879 29 
16,918 62 


$3,339,349 20 
42,095 80 
33,563 14 


$31,166,783 35 
675,588 84 
313,816 46 


$24,863,841 57 
17,481 37 
53,277 59 


112,514 89 
54,133 85 


36.042 97 
16,124 83 


25,914 28 
16,455 74 


9.664 95 
3,808 54 


6,309 00 
4,140 48 


8,295 32 
4,638 29 


86,226 52 
45,167 88 


26,288 37 
8,965 97 


494,994 89 


i35,474 il 


180,769 58 


48,078 15 


64,066 71 


28,012 19 


456,400 74 


38,594 15 


178,105 64 
125.698 31 
124,074 94 
55,015 77 
879 18 


49,160 36 

41,471 26 

37,293 76 

13,643 72 

1,236 72 

2,759 45 

4,752 74 

2,053 51 


45,746 16 
35,229 46 
33,933 12 
18,233 18 


7,757 56 

8,524 38 

8,368 60 

2,321 65 

379 80 

529 49 

855 35 

285 12 


17.866 00 

11,255 04 

8,001 51 

5,104 07 

420 45 

863 50 

1.305 72 

589 75 


13,041 20 

8,245 17 

9,668 40 

2.341 35 

209 06 

418 09 

627 15 

292 67 




133,571 28 
104,725 31 
97,265 39 
41,643 97 
2,246 03 
8,786 27 
14,685 37 
5,239 65 


44.534 36 
20,973 00 
26,809 55 
13,371 80 
tl.366 85 
3.056 54 
4,416 74 
tll9 81 


11,842 81 
19,102 11 
5,119 84 


4,215 74 
7,144 41 
2,018 60 


1,822 47 
135,447 41 


766 45 
59,146 63 


1,170 11 
14,796 97 


81 46 
3,030 95 


520 61 
16.720 42 


292 67 
9,876 47 


2,831 30 
103,571 44 


tl,008 83 
31,875 97 


103,880 48 


35,524 51 


26,721 55 


1,655 47 


8.301 52 


7,889 28 



80.092 33 


23,788 15 


97,019 86 
86.294 66 

96,028 25 

99,860 11 

76,172 75 
69,552 66 
75,992 98 
12,939,706 79 
73,430 95 


31,262 10 
34,926 59 

56,278 70 

34,930 14 

28,046 81 
26,547 23 
23.249 14 
4,825,423 51 
22,729 44 


27,696 63 
24,468 44 

12,671 06 

25,473 31 

18,906 35 
12,824 79 
15 415 34 
4,191,134 68 
23.104 51 


5,426 06 
3,617 61 

207 06 

8,591 22 

6,676 38 
5,417 35 
7,004 21 
1,232,541 96 
1,450 16 


10,663 91 
7,053 52 

13,220 63 

8,678 16 

15,095 54 
3,316 37 

3.729 82 

481,582 62 

8.646 19 


3,964 36 
3.972 65 

3,127 74 

5,398 59 

4,840 50 
10,185 00 
5,144 00 
762,841 41 
4,345 46 


79,013 06 
74.038 81 

85,505 19 

83,071 42 

73,565 58 
58,290 74 
54,542 51 
11,493,524 18 
60.275 76 


18,006 80 
12.255 85 

10,523 06 

16,788 69 

2,607 17 

11,261 92 

21.450 47 

1.446.182 61 

13,155 19 



































180 



Year Book 



VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

CLASS "B,' 



Location 



Name of UxaiTT 



Gross Operatmg Revenues 



Exchange 



Toll 



Rentals Miscellaneous 



Attica 

Brookville 

West Lebanon. . . . 

Delphi 

Cambridge City. . . 

Columbus 

Decatur 

Fairmount 

Churubusco 

Warsaw 

Connersville 

Danville 

Crown Point 

Greensburg 

Huntingburg 

North Manchester. 

Corydon 

Columbia City 

Flora 

Covington 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Greencastle 

Greenfield 

Angola 

Bicknell 

Noblesville 

Portland 

Salem 

Clinton 

Fowler 

Rensselaer 

North Vernon 

St. Louis, Mo 

Knightstown 

Lafontaine 

Lebanon 

Liberty 

Ligonier 

Madison 

Martinsville 

Mitchell 

Monticello 

Nappanee 

Linton 

Albion 

Lagrange 

Rising Sun 

- Rockville '. 

Silver Lake 

Petersburg 

Princeton 

Carthage 

Rochester 

Rushville 

Aurora 

Sullivan 

Tipton 

Union City 

Goodland 

Columbia City — 

Leesburg 

Bremen 

Butler 

Hope 

Huntington R.R.5 

Monroeville 

Albany 

Edinburg 



Attica Telephone Co 

Brookville Telephone Co 

Cadwallder Telephone Co 

Carroll Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Churubusco Telephone Co 

Commercial Telephone Co 

Connersville Telephone Co 

Consolidated Telephone Co 

Crown Point Telephone Co 

Decatur County Indpt. Tel. Co.. 
Dubois County Telephone Co. . . 

Eel River Telephone Co 

Eureka Telephone Co 

Farmers Mutual Tel. Co 

Flora Telephone Co 

Fountain Telephone Co 

Franklin Telephone Co 

Garrett Telephone Co 

Greencastle Telephone Co . . 

Greenfield Telephone Co 

Steuben County Tel. Co 

Home Telephone Co 

Home Telephone Co 

Home Telephone Co 

Hoosier Telephone Co 

Indiana Tel. & Teleg. Co 

Indiana Union Tel.& Teleg.Co . . 
Jasper County Telephone Co.. . . 
Jennings County Telephone Co. . 
Kinlock Long Distance Tel.Co . . 

Knightstown Telephone Co 

Lafontaine Telephone Co 

Lebanon Telephone Co 

Liberty Telephone Co 

Ligonier Telephone Co 

Madison Telephone Co 

Martinsville Telephone Co 

Mitchell Telephone Co 

Monticello Telephone Co 

Nappanee Telephone Co 

New Home Telephone Co 

Noble County Telephone Co. . . . 
Northern Ind. & Southern Mich. 

Tel., Teleg. & Cable Co 

Ohio River Telephone Co 

Parke County Telephone Co 

People's Mutual Telephone Co. . 

Pike County Telephone Co 

Princeton Telephone Co 

Ripley Farmers Co-oper.Tel.Co. 

Rochester Telephone Co 

Rushville Co-operative Tel. Co. . 

Southern Indiana Tel. Co 

Sullivan Telephone Co 

Tipton Telephone Co 

Union City Telephone Co 

Western Indiana Telephone Co. . 

Whitley County Tel. Co 

Public Service Telephone Co. . . . 
Bremen Home Telephone Co.. . . 

The Butler Telephone Co 

Hope Independent Tel. Co 

The Majenica Telephone Co 

Monroeville Telephone Co 

The Co-operative Telphone Co. . 
Citizens Telephone Co 



$15,338 06 
13,913 53 
26,925 20 
11,026 75 
36,221 36 
41,465 99 
35,912 26 
13,601 17 
11,037 10 
27,084 96 
50,275 54 
29,144 50 
18,872 70 
46,121 66 
41,881 55 
16,204 91 
14,557 91 
23,479 52 
14,976 43 
9,616 55 
36,862 13 
23,584 33 
17,486 20 
19,573 91 
44,830 95 

See combined 
26,253 89 
36,515 92 
26,546 80 
39,589 73 
5,941 31 
20,850 61 

See combined 
No Data . . . 
15,090 21 
11,838 69 
33,002 65 
17,535 65 
10,512 01 
28,372 04 
22,286 25 
15,655 73 
21,281 29 
12,587 95 
44,843 96 
12,985 35 

25,202 19 
20,294 68 
18,905 46 
14,315 95 
32,523 57 
27,972 04 
15,361 33 
24,486 36 
33,153 08 
28,566 04 
23,095 76 
21,461 12 
34,086 25 
8,845 55 
26,692 75 
12,030 77 
10,247 29 
10,996 95 
15,276 35 
11,209 43 
10,944 87 
12,391 56 
13,431 



$4,316 01 
5,196 39 
3,643 07 
2,920 78 
6,379 28 
4,634 20 

13,265 15 
5,765 95 
2,228 34 

13,359 48 
6,567 78 
4,215 36 
2,894 96 
3,018 09 
2,518 54 
3,036 80 
866 50 
50 00 
2,062 35 
2,614 72 
4,409 91 
1,190 02 
4,171 66 
5,692 73 

10,324 15 
report South 
3,925 67 
4,511 59 
1,268 21 
6,773 46 
1,647 93 
4,071 93 
report South 



$54 00 
i! 247' 30 



318 18 



$35 65 

1,212 49 

291 90 

168 40 

23 05 

134 94 

1,299 94 

511 08 

160 00 

1.401 21 



382 00 
96 00 



185 23 
4 25 
149 37 
33 63 
729 24 
568 88 
135 90 
528 68 
318 45 



421 61 



46 00 
em Ind. Tel 



23 97 

43 90 

& Teleg. Co.. . . 

105 75 



2 52 
ernInd.T?ei. 



829 82 

241 50 

1,403 51 

& Teleg. Co 



3,023 66 
1,162 69 
5,300 50 
2,991 09 
3,442 41 
7,013 14 
4,008 75 
3,987 78 
4.331 58 
4,189 25 
16,065 45 
1,494 72 

4,663 19 
5,780 
4,580 55 
2,066 41 
4,585 94 
2,635 58 
783 61 
9,709 63 
4,247 23 

11,542 

21,678 71 
5,624 39 
4,010 48 
3,039 71 
5,419 42 
1,567 21 
1,508 58 
1,255 50 
1,679 38 
2,118 28 
700 30 
1,290 62 
1,164 30 



138 00 
42 00 



266 21 

2 10 

749 37 



569 00 



129 69 
878 50 

29 40 

79 GO 
467 96 

46 25 
967 54 

19 GO 



12 GO 



229 50 



120 00 
120 00 



1,114 20 
1,919 69 



287 80 

1,321 77 

157 50 

241 15 

20 70 



421 44 

6 00 

163 50 



60 00 

117 50 

509 65 

201 00 

5 70 

7 93 



tDeficit. 



Public Service Commission 



181 



OF PUBLIC UTILITIES— Continued 

Year mO 

TELEPHONE 





Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 




Maintenance 






General 


Taxes and 




Total 


and 
Depreciation 


Traffic 


Commercial 


and 
Miscellaneous 


Uncollectible 
Accounts 


Total 


Revenue 


$19,689 72 


$5,191 52 


$5,068 05 


$1,492 03 


$1,821 19 


$1,163 74 


$14,754 53 


84,935 19 


■ 20,322 41 
30,914 17 


7,803 39 


3,896 00 




3,538 52 


781 13 


16,019 04 


4 303 37 


14,163 23 


8,863 05 


• 429'26 


5,962 97 


1,149 61 


30,568 06 


• 346 11 


14,115 93 


5,949 10 


4,159 27 


660 49 


3,431 54 


1,084 31 


15,284 71 


tl,168 78 


43,870 99 


12,671 61 


12,032 59 


1,064 22 


7,571 17 


2,246 68 


35,586 27 


8,284 72 


46,235 13 


10,644 79 


13,783 16 


2,944 60 


6,702 47 


5,031 25 


39,106 27 


7,128 86 


50,477 35 


15,736 86 


14,832 52 


2,939 32 


4,236 34 


3,481 59 


41,226 63 


9,250 72 


20,196 38 


6,964 12 


6,174 81 


1,521 78 


1,792 01 


1,634 76 


18,087 48 


2,108 90 


13,425 44 
41,845 65 


3,916 73 
10,104 56 


2,891 02 




2 848 44 


837 47 


10,493 66 


2,931 78 
10,853 88 


9,625 24 


3i7'68 


8,393 60 


2,550 69 


30,991 77 


56,843 32 


24,456 60 


16,594 80 


771 64 


6,442 93 


2,023 24 


49,289 21 


7,554 11 


33,927 09 


15,470 41 


11,064 52 


1,707 43 


8,865 46 


2,633 71 


39,741 53 


t5,814 44 


21,867 91 


7,129 83 


11,101 42 


1,841 85 


439 67 


768 00 


21,280 77 


587 14 


49,289 12 


21,381 20 


10,782 80 


2,425 02 


4.465 97 


2,841 92 


41,896 91 


7.392 21 


44,433 72 


17,423 24 


12,400 08 


107 56 


3,722 49 


2,468 15 


36,121 52 


8,312 20 


19,970 95 
15 993 29 


5 698 76 


4,519 82 
8 943 24 




2,811 23 
1,478 61 


2,032 23 
620 52 


15 062 04 


4,908 91 
t944 53 


5^895 45 




16^937 82 


23,665 42 


7,792 58 


9,291 30 


'13595 


2,588 29 


1,433 54 


21,241 66 


2,423 76 


17,567 46 


4,230 11 


4,840 41 


225 00 


3,959 63 


933 30 


14,188 45 


3,379 01 


12,549 72 


2,675 33 


2,595 18 


348 00 


1,962 61 


865 00 


8,446 12 


4,103 60 


41.272 04 


15,149 44 


11,925 17 


384 94 


6,347 60 


2,350 15 


36,157 30 


5,114 74 


25,195 96 


7,648 76 


6,490 78 


2,333 21 


1,159 57 


1,570 02 


19,202 34 


5,993 62 


21,657 86 


7,168 49 


7,073 89 


1,894 19 


4,197 61 


1,284 18 


21,618 36 


39 50 


25,290 61 


9,288 07 


7,051 48 


1,858 48 


2,166 71 


924 70 


21,307 44 


3,983 17 


55,245 00 


18,868 96 


22,169 36 


1,835 91 


9,976 35 


3,600 55 


56,451 13 


tl,206 13 


Seymour CI 


ass "A" 














30.285 31 


8,882 66 


""9;226"93 


3^il6 i3 


"3;653'28 


""2;636'05 


■27;503 05 


2;782'26 


41,027 51 


12,207 88 


9,025 17 


910 11 


6,466 51 


2,416 17 


31,025 84 


10,001 67 


27,815 01 


11,151 53 


9,329 21 


1,542 18 


3,972 18 


1,388 06 


27,383 16 


431 85 


47,195 53 


12,732 98 


14,391 92 


5,804 27 


2,655 14 


2,690 36 


38,274 67 


8,920 86 


7,830 74 


2,356 23 


2,532 51 


1,311 79 


353 80 


287 90 


6,842 23 


988 51 


26,326 05 


10,083 31 


8,562 38 


213 80 


5,587 28 


1,002 64 


25,449 41 


876 64 


Seymour CI 


ass "A" 






























"is^sis'os 


'""5;399'47 


■ ^isii'go 


"■■i;457'36 


" "3;636'97 


897'56 


'"i5i697'26 


"'"'"'2;826'88 


13,045 48 


4,773 74 


5,619 90 


215 85 


1,843 71 


659 57 


13,112 77 


t67 29 


39,052 52 


10,284 20 


9,344 19 


1,166 04 


6,493 94 


3,848 24 


31,136 61 


7,915 91 


20,526 74 


8,533 21 


4,217 04 


125 58 


3,967 69 


585 44 


17,428 96 


3,097 78 


14,084 11 


4,150 04 


3,450 79 




3,269 84 


697 36 


11,568 03 


2,516 08 


36,263 68 


12,490 07 


11,660 64 


""siiio'so 


2,953 79 


2,357 95 


32,572 75 


3,690 93 


26,324 40 


9,444 41 


5,776 98 


1,552 90 


4,986 75 


3,914 10 


25,675 14 


649 26 


19,722 51 


6,814 74 


5,679 98 


1,536 87 


3,078 36 


. 900 00 


18,009 95 


1,712 56 


26,649 83 


10,223 09 


6,349 94 


2,312 50 


2,951 16 


1,487 16 


23,323 85 


3,325 98 


16,823 45 


5,792 83 


3,601 89 


882 95 


2,776 01 


789 71 


13,843 39 


2,980 06 


61,876 95 


12,219 80 


20,164 15 


7,173 63 


2,539 06 


2,624 84 


44,721 48 


17,155 47 


14,499 07 


4,703 82 


5,058 19 


128 39 


1,273 02 


1,013 06 


12,176 48 


2,322 59 


29,865 38 


9,-894 69 


10,627 85 


2,151 54 


3,612 30 


2,890 03 


29,176 41 


688 97 


26,075 53 


6.607 00 


8,898 88 




4,290 56 


1,532 65 


21,329 09 


4,746 44 


23,727 51 


8,290 81 


7,882 60 


■■■■2;618i3 


1,360 15 


1,316 15 


21,467 84 


2,259 67 


16,382 36 


4,105 72 


5,507 64 


20 00 


3,657 36 


452 84 


13,743 56 


2,638 80 


38,223 71 


14,816 18 


8,085 74 


2,045 65 


5,198 30 


1.601 58 


31,747 45 


6,476 26 


32,527 31 


10,536 19 


8,483 67 


1,563 86 


4,137 81 


1,471 58 


26,193 11 


6,334 20 


16,264 94 


6,340 83 


4,563 38 


. 243 99 


1,598 20 


876 09 


13,622 49 


2,642 45 


34,603 79 


8,731 80 


6,842 57 


2,252 88 


3,299 11 


2,133 79 


23,260 15 


11,343 64 


38,722 08 


20,151 25 


6,207 30 


278 38 


4,757 07 


2,526 63 


33,920 63 


4,801 45 


40,266 38 


11,778 90 


11,116 95 


2,514 91 


5,194 44 


1,700 05 


32,305 25 


7,961 13 


45,015 62 


11,156 62 


9,532 05 


3,080 33 


4,303 04 


4,828 02 


32,900 06 


12,115 56 


27,106 21 


7,195 30 


7,439 76 


211 90 


3,826 51 


1,639 59 


20,313 06 


6,793 15 


38,096 73 


14,731 73 


9,520 63 


865 90 


4,032 96 


1,857 00 


31,008 22 


7,088 51 


12,306 70 


3,672 42 


3,455 71 


756 76 


748 06 


639 74 


9,272 69 


3,034 01 


32.118 17 


11,449 78 


11,639 68 


1,983 90 


2,804 33 


1,581 60 


29,459 29 


2,658 88 


13,761 48 


5,045 83 


2,576 85 


184 13 


2,678 46 


838 76 


11,324 03 


2,437 45 


11,755 87 


3,807 14 


3,133 34 


210 75 


1,734 18 


360 00 


9,245 41 


2,510 46 


12,312 45 


4,684 43 


2,925 61 


554 82 


1,645 79 


440 46 


10,251 11 


2,061 34 


17,073 23 


5,167 93 


5,835 82 


1,434 03 


2,030 69 


919 91 


15,388 38 


1,684 85 


13,837 36 


6,665 67 


4,330 64 


174 02 


1,859 70 


1,237 70 


14,277 73 


t440 37 


11,846 17 


4,493 28 


2,556 87 


306 73 


1,968 25 


682 04 


10,007 17 


1,839 00 


13,687 88 


4,498 08 


2,828 29 


2,414 51 


1,282 27 


539 35 


11,562 50 


2,125 3S 


14,604 22 


6,052 72 


3,343 10 


888 70 


1,940 24 


1,017 22 


13,241 98 


1,362 24 



182 



Year Book 









VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

CLASS "A." ■ WA 




Name of Utility 


Gross Operating Revenues 


Location 


Commercial 

and 
Industrial 


Municipal 

Fire 
Hydrants 


Miscellaneo's 


Total 




(a) mttnicipally owned 
Anderson Water Works 


156,140 26 
214,292 37 
196,040 34 
122,692 09 
38,454 49 
97,311 16 
46,989 74 




$3,555 62 
1,515 26 
4,790 68 
7,170 79 
7,668 45 
5,725 02 
60 00 


$59,695 88 
233,187 63 




Evansville Water Works 


$17,380 00 
31,762 50 
20,440 00 
15,040 75 
14,600 00 
10,403 25 


Fort Wayne 


Fort Wayne Water Works 

Hammond Water Works 


232,593 52 
150,302 88 


Huntington 

Lafayette 


Huntington Water Works 

Lafayette Water Works 


61,163 69 
117,636 18 


Laporte 


Laporte Water Works 


57,452 99 


Logan sport 

Marion . . 




58,457 84 


Marion City Water Works 

Michigan City Water Works 

City Water and Light Co 


51,350 46 
41,963 26 
31,910 40 
32,063 43 
175,544 11 

137,271 32 
72,353 87 
24,327 24 

184,531 66 
1,207,546 07 

35,894 23 
81,742 13 

104,965 04 
96,654 24 
94,182 14 

191,258 61 
60,533 72 






51,350 46 








41,963 26 


Mishawaka 


11,340 00 

7, 920 00 

26,493 34 

17,001 39 

15,797 44 

8,480 00 

25,400 41 

167,338 25 

9,448 29 
13,140 76 
13,085 95 
13,888 42 
20,305 25 
57,811 31 
14,524 56 


3,967 68 
5,164 80 
27,805 47 

3,214 43 

344 37 

123 46 

14,000 80 

20,398 30 


47,218 08 


Peru 


Peru Water Works 


45,148 23 


South Bend 


City Water Works 


229,842 92 


East Chicago 

Elkhart 


(b) privatelt owned 

E.Chicago & Ind.Harbor Water Co. 
Elkhart Water Co 


157,487 14 
88,495 68 


Elwood 


Elwood Water Co 


32,930 70 


Gary 


Gary Heat Light & Water Co 

Indianapolis Water Co 


223,932 87 


Indianapolis 

Jeffersonville 


1,395,282 62 


Jeffersonville Water T;ight and 
Power Co . 


45,342 52 




Kokomo Water Works 


2,304 20 
4,019 80 
439 80 
10,224 09 
2,551 33 
1,895 97 


97,187 09 


Muncie . . . 


Muncie Water Works Co 


122,070 79 


New Albany 

Richmond 

Terre Haute 

Vincennes 


New Albany Water Works 

Richmond City Water Works 

Terre Haute Water Works Co 

Vincennes Water Supply Co 


111,036 46 

124,711 48 

251,621 25 

76,954 25 



tDeficit. 



Public Service Commission 



183 



OF PUBLIC UTILITES— Continued 

Year 1920 

TER UTILITIES 



Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 
Revenue 


Pumping 


Distribution 


Commercial 


General 

and 

Undistribut'd 


Depreciation 


Taxes 


Total 


$34,065 25 


$4,831 35 

29,762 69 

21,742 40 

6,457 29 

2,519 61 

5,029 38 

898 59 


$2,465 90 
6,070 11 
10,147 09 
1,320 58 
331 24 
2,430 63 
213 77 


$7,676 11 
28,144 72 
26,476 83 
27,341 37 
3,520 96 
5,831 82 
4,546 85 


$3,928 56 
18,000 00 
11,901.24 
8,590 93 
2,428 19 




$52,967 17 
191,766 14 

137.883 59 
106,306 19 

44,669 64 
90,276 35 
37,949 49 
52,623 08 
59,988 70 
47,003 74 
39,831 14 
37,870 14 
126,734 78 

108,652 23 
71,385 09 
24,460 26 

191.884 94 
741,687 48 

34,324 02 
58,589 75 
75,258 66 
73,583 64 
" 82,792 84 
182,378 30 
56,266 89 


$6,728 71 
41 421 49 


109,788 62 




67,616 03 




94 709 93 


62,596 02 




43 996 69 


35,869 64 




16 494 05 


76,984 52 




27,359 83 


28,390 28 


3,900 00 




19 503 50 






5,834 76 


50,710 10 


4,799 73 
3,457 53 
3,903 90 
2,442 58 
24,551 50 

7,770 90 
1,641 09 
3,419 50 

27,478 12 
46,902 38 

2,189 30 
9,359 15 
3,145 98 
3,994 22 
7,896 32 
11,264 96 
4,293 29 


852 80 
427 75 
499 21 
197 36 
6,289 55 

1,405 61 

810 99 

343 71 

5,515 28 

6,811 17 

256 77 
4,469 39 
3,117 81 
3,894 74 
4,427 26 
8,872 97 
3,849 77 


3,626 07 
6,736 98 
4,641 95 
3,390 07 
27,827 96 

11,593 83 

11,155 43 

5,296 89 

36,897 47 

109,685 14 

5,517 58 
17,994 92 
12,583 09 

8,267 57 
13,961 88 
34,048 68 

9,392 48 






t8 638 24 


36,381 48 







t5,040 48 
7 386 94 


22,018 24 


8,767 84 

5,731 30 

22,947 22 

12,000 00 
15,000 00 
1,375 91 
60,200 74 
80,705 50 

6,107 36 
731 89 

3,659 29 

3,140 99 
18,037 87 
10,534 75 

3,935 88 




26,108 83 




7,278 09 


45,118 55 




103 108 14 


54,756 37 
30,498 65 
10,708 71 
30,035 91 
222,583 29 

15,073 77 
17,829 94 
30,286 28 
45,024 13 
23,400 78 
56,399 08 
22,439 08 


21,125 52 

12,278 93 

3,315 54 

31,757 42 

275,000 00 

5,179 24 
8,204 46 
22,466 21 
9,261 99 
15,068 73 
61,257 86 
12,356 39 


48,834 91 

17,110 59 

8,470 44 

32,047 93 

653,595 14 

11,018 50 
38,597 34 
46,812 13 
37,452 82 
41,918 64 
69,242 95 
20,687 36 



184 



Year Book 



VIII. OPERATING STATISTICS 

Calendar 

CLASS "B." WA 





Name of Utility 


Gross Operating Revenues 


Location 


Commercial 

and 
Industrial 


Municipal 

Fire 
Hydrants 


Miscellaneo's 


Total 




(a) municipally owned 
Alexandria Water Works 










Attica . ... 


City Light and Water Plant 

Auburn Water and Electric Works. 
Bedford Water Works 


$8,749 81 
15,746 71 
27,475 04 


$2,760 00 
2,400 00 
3,331 95 




$11,509 81 


Auburn 


$61 19 
954 19 


18,207 90 


Bedford 


31,761 18 




City Water Works 




Bluffton 


Bluffton Munic. Water Works .... 
Boonville Water Works 


11,617 71 
10,299 24 
15,350 52 
18,807 73 
9,324 73 
37,823 66 
25,103 94 


7,864 87 


62 30 


19,544 88 


Boonville 


10,299 24 


Brazil 


Brazil City Water Works 


5,475 80 
5,511 00 
903 07 
9,100 08 
5,041 68 


122 72 

2,958 04 

2 50 


20,949 04 


Clinton 


Clinton Water Works 


27,276 77 


Columbia City 

Columbus 


Columbia City Water Works 

Municipal Water Plant 


10,230 30 
46,923 74 




City Water Works 




30,145 62 


Decatur 


Decatur Light and Power Plant . . 






Dunkirk 


Dunkirk Water Works 


5,339 42 
11,202 10 


1,600 00 
1,322 76 




6,939 42 


Garrett 


Water Works Department 

City Elec. Light & Water Works. . 


22 40 


12,547 26 






Gas City 


Municipal Water Plant 












Greenfield Water Works 






. 




Hartford City.... 
Kendallville 


Hartford City Water Works 

Water Works Department 


19,060 62 


175 00 


91 00 


19,326 62 




Lebanon Water Works 


23,464 30 
12,021 98 
10,111 83 


7,800 00 


1,559 95 


32,824 25 


Madison 


Madison Water Works . 


12,021 98 


Martinsville 

Mitchell 


Martinsville Water Supply ... 

Mitchell Water Works 


4,275 00 


54 00 


14,440 83 


New Castle 

Plymouth 


New Castle Water & Light Plant. . 
Municipal Water Works 


39,612 51 


3,100 00 


765 56 


43,478 07 


Portland . 




11,822 18 
8,026 30 


5,551 05 
2,500 00 




17,373 23 


Rochester 

Rushville . 


Rochester City Water Works 

Municipal Water Works 


1,804 22 


12,330 52 


Tell City 


Tell City Water Works 


7,284 58 

9,414 87 

14,341 73 

24,658 80 

13,709 90 
20,022 80 
36,880 28 
35,243 72 
10,899 08 
29,202 29 
26,751 37 
1,130 00 
1,958 51 
21,135 90 
24,163 55 
12,110 13 
35,328 82 
31,988 11 
24,826 25 
11,742 70 
29,866 86 
35,434 30 
25,579 38 
37,834 91 
23,022 12 
10,327 15 


2,500-00 

3,220 00 

584 80 


950 


9,794 08 


Tipton 


Tipton Water Works 


12,634 87 


Union City 

Whiting.. . . 


Union City Water Works 




14,926 53 


City of Whiting Water Dep't 

(b) privately owned 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Bicknell Water Works 


829 23 


25,488 03 


A urora 


3,683 36 
4,200 00 
7,840 00 
9,997 85 
5,433 30 
6,928 72 
9,020 00 
2,499 96 


17,393 26 


Bicknell 


210 11 


24,432 91 


Cr a wf or dsvil le 


Northern Ind. Gas and Elec. Co. . . 
Frankfort Water Works 


44,720 28 


Frankfort 


854 13 


46,095 70 




Franklin Water Light & Power Co. 
Greencastle Water Works 


16,332 38 


Greencastle 

Greensburg 

Jasonville 


1,220 92 
75 35 


37,351 93 
35,846 72 


Wabash Valley Electric Co 


3,629 96 


Lawrenceburg .... 




1,958 51 


Linton Water Co 


5,600 00 
4,444 02 
4,634 25 
7,859 77 
9,075 00 
4,590 00 
8,844 44 
8,125 00 
11,598 75 
5.556 25 
6,990 00 
2,317 00 
3,400 00 


534 80 

1,137 84 

629 50 


27,270 70 


Mt. Vernon 

Noblesville 


Mt. Vernon Water Works 

Noblesville Water & Light Co 

Princeton Water and Light Co 

Seymour Water Co 


29,745 41 
17,373 88 
43,188 59 


Seymour 


496 71 


41,559 82 


Shelbyville 


Interstate Public Service Co 

Sullivan County Water Co 

Valparaiso Home Water Co 

Wabash Water and Light Co 

Winona Electric Water & Light Co 
Washington Water, Light & Pr.Co. 

W. Lafayette Water Works 

Citizens Heat, Light & Power Co. . 


29,416 25 


2,386 71 


22,973 85 


Valparaiso 

Wabash 


37,991 86 




47,033 05 


Warsaw 




31,135 63 


Washington 

W. Lafayette 

Winchester 


517 79 

35 98 

570 24 


45,342 70 
25,375 10 
14.297 39 



tDeficit. 
*Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



185 



OF PUBLIC UTILITES— Continued 
Year 1920 
TER UTILITES 



Operating Expenses 


Net 
Operating 
Revenue 


Pumping 


Distribution 


Commercial 


General 

and 

Undistributed 


Depreciation 

and 
Contingencies 


Taxes 


Total 


















$6,556 82 


$2,099 09 


$150 00 
46 70 
952 33 


$774 50 

391 70 

1,464 25 






$9,490 41 
15,562 02 
29,289 61 


$2,019 40 
2 645 88 


14 250 90 


$872 72 




23,957 60 


2,915 43 




2,471 57 








13,469 02 


2,419 62 
4,647 21 
1,657 04 
1,766 20 
312 95 
1,935 15 
2,361 77 


84 


1,570 39 
600 00 
1,170 36 
2,736 58 
560 78 
1,101 52 
1,963 23 


2,715 00 




20,174 87 
8,847 21 
20,898 77 
18,889 07 
8,042 85 
32,754 54 
44,595 26 


1629 99 
1 452 03 


3,600 00 
16,095 28 




408 88 
101 50 
34 61 
88 53 
185 42 


1,567 21 
2,100 00 


, 


50 27 


12,184 79 




8,387 70 
2 187 45 


7,134 51 




29,629 34 






14 169 20 


38,028 26 


2,056 58 




tl4,449 64 






4,458 41 


1,355 50 

857 29 


96 75 
307 59 


348 07 
1,081 20 


400 42 




6,659 15 
11,740 12 


280 27 


9,494 04 




807 14 










































14,027 84 


472 23 


243 50 


434 21 






15,177 78 


4 148 84 










17,868 23 


2,742 84 

2,617 74 

293 24 


185 60 


3,377 03 

650 76 

15 93 






24,173 70 
12,330 85 
7,730 82 


8 650 55 


9,062 35 






t308 87 


7,421 65 








6 710 01 












25,548 62 


1,420 95 


271 16 


4,551 25 


3,029 73 




34,821 71 


8 656 36 








3 600 00 


2,172 33 
1,867 56 




11.84 
1,060 24 






5,784 17 
7,500 97 


11,589 06 


3,837 07 




736 10 




4,829 55 










7,184 39 


185 37 
2,196 62 
1,049 57 

996 51 

1,685 62 

912 17 

3,157 16 

5,023 98 

975 88 

2,690 51 

2,394 03 

221 54 


66 00 
104 13 
373 15 


23 00 
1,005 36 
1,538 49 
2,651 87 

1,493 41 
2,385 65 
2,172 93 
7,524 27 
1,713 42 
5,138 74 
3,473 91 
383 60 

24 52 
3,524 88 
4,528 06 
2,500 23 
6,058 90 

10,525 26 
2,712 33 
7,793 31 
5,846 09 
6,447 85 
5,640 80 
4,915 21 
6,592 51 
1,395 52 


480 00 
945 15 
600 00 




7,938 76 
12,481 86 
11,598 08 
10,495 70 

14,788 46 
13,604 80 
30,165 55 
41,451 49 
12,466 55 
31,112 20 
26,403 10 
4,952 23 
889 52 
18,582 79 
27,240 92 
14,610 97 
30,120 18 

26.216 29 
17,905 50 
22,061 79 

28.217 48 
26,956 67 
28,954 90 
42,074 56 
22,752 08 
10,114 82 


1,855 32 


8 230 60 




153 01 


8,036 87 




3,328 45 


6 847 32 




14,992 33 


10,017 12 
8,716 69 
16,442 34 


310 54 
665 39 

3,313 77 
546 88 
670 05 

2,546 26 

152 36 

72 47 

256 68 


316 52 
850 00 


965 25 

74 90 

5,079 35 

6,917 98 

990 00 
3,722 92 
5,258 38 

720 00 
8 32 
1,517 20 
5,159 75 
2,248 83 
4,653 07 
2,785 50 
3,264 00 
2,405 39 

759 84 


2,604 80 
10,828 11 
14,554 73 


18,259 45 
8,571 34 
15,286 97 
13,413 46 
1,685 37 
600 00 


3,178 93 
*454 14 
1,726 80 
1,710 96 
1,869 25 


4,644 21 
3,865 83 
6,239 73 
9,443 62 
1,322 27 
1,068 99 


11 142 52 


670 03 
832 75 
1,072 26 
2,382 47 
1,739 41 
1,652 22 
1,605 55 
2,102 21 
3,996 48 
2,372 75 
1,810 35 
439 82 
1,320 12 


1,638 16 
1,069 10 


8,687 91 


14,841 35 

8,716 82 
13,384 61 

9,439 09 
10,874 79 

6,959 24 
15,616 82 
15,834 14 
17,861 86 
26,198 26 
11,703 56 

3,469 20 


809 91 
72 83 

1,752 42 
127 03 
982 50 
19 75 
274 22 
678 20 
326 21 
862 42 

1.080 76 
262 41 


2,504 49 
2,762 91 


1,888 71 
1,600 00 
*1,580 34 
3,278 55 
3,618 30 


13,068 41 
15,343 53 
11,510 75 
912 06 
9,774 38 
20,076 38 


949 54 

2,456 29 

85 07 

2,500 46 


1,803 74 
5,832 03 
2,850 36 
1,167 11 


2,180 73 
3,268 14 
2,623 02 
4,182 57 



186 



Year Book 



TABLE IX. REVENUES AND 

For the 

CLASS "A." ELECTRIC UTIL 



Location 



Name op Utility 



S3W 



Anderson. . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Huntington 
Logansport 
Marion . . . , 
Mishawaka 

Peru 

Richmond. 



Aurora 

Whiting 

Hammond . . . 
Lafayette .... 
Michigan City 
East Chicago . 

Elkhart 

Mishawaka . . 
South Bend.. 

Elwood 

Marion 

Muncie 

Evansville 

Ft. Wayne... 

Gary 

Gary 

Huntington. . 
Indianapolis. . . 
Indianapohs. . , 
JefFersonville... 
New Albany. . . 

Kokomo 

Laporte 

Logansport 

Terre Haute. . . 

Vincemes 

Williams 

Bedford 

Columbus 

BloomingtoQ.. . 
Shelbyville.... 
New Castle 



(a) municipally owned 



Municipal Light and Power Plant 

Municipal Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light & Power Plant. 
Municipal Electric Light & Power Plant. 



14,082,900 
12,506,510 



10,403,219 
10,847,924 



.03740 
.04197 



(b) privately owned 



Interstate Public Service Co , 

Northern Indiana Gas & Electric Co 

Northern Indiana Gas & Electric Co 

Northern Indiana Gas & Electric Co 

Northern Indiana Gas & Electric Co 

Northern Indiana Gas & Electric Co 

Indiana and Michigan Electric Co 

Indiana and Michigan Electric Co 

Indiana & Mich. Electric Co. (Combined. 

Indiana General Service Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Evansville Public Utilities Co 

Indiana Service Corporation 

Calument Electric Co 

Gary Heat, Light and Water Co 

Huntington Light and Fuel Co 

Indianapolis Light and Heat Co 

Merchants Heat and Light Co 

United Gas and Electric Co 



Indiana Railways and Light Co. . 

Laporte Gas and Electric Co 

Logansport Utilities Co 

Terre Haute Indianapolis and 

Traction Co 

Indiana Power Co 



Southern Indiana Power Co . 

Central Indiana Lighting Co. 
Central Indiana Lighting Co. 
Interstate Public Service Co . 
Interstate Public Service Co . 



Maximum. 
Minimum. 



7,808,913 

438,616 

2,218,299 

3,607,850 

13,936,860 



839,200 

See Combined 

68,591,109 

8,718, 

9,819,940 

See Combined 

See Combined 

See Combined 

103,693,910 

See Combined 

See Combined 

73,544,580 

25,662,104 

32,074,621 

11,906,497 

10,736,956 

7,047,490 

114,081,576 

74,771,000 

13,825,406 

16,531,698 
5,594,330 



5,970,318 



.04695 



45,814,178 
4,589,670 

16,936,390 

2,969,810 
2,666,966 
2,601,540 
3,207,001 

114,081,576 
438,616 



1,892,794 
2,887,546 
11,168,064 



543,712 

report — Ham 

60,023,661 

6,903,608 

7,726,973 

report — Ha 

Report — Sou 

Report— So a 

84,094,274 

Report — Mu 

Report — Mu 

53,772,671 

23,224,529 

26,907, 

10,289,966 

8,587,997 

5,658,532 

86,861,362 

61,572,581 

11,491,373 

13,531,277 
4,651,506 
1,165,220 

24,231,712 
3,625,711 

13,009,717 

2,365,802 
2,352,464 
1,927,310 
2,155,109 

86,861,362 
543.712 



.05254 
.05472 
.03484 



.05146 

mond. 

.02487 
.05643 
.03749 

mmond 

th Bend 

th Bend 
.02531 

ncie 

ncie 

.03085 
.03095 
.03207 
.01627 
.06455 
.03809 
.03350 
.04063 

.02965 

.04090 
.05096 
.03216 

.03500 
.01694 

.01940 

.04469 
.05223 
.05299 
.05595 

.06455 
.01627 



tDeficit. 
♦Credit. 



Public Servich Commission 



187 



EXPENSES PER UNIT 

Year 1920 

ITIES PER K. W. H. SOLD 



Operating Expenses per K. W. H. Sold 




Classification I 


Classification II 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 






1 


1 


1 


J 
1 


S 

^ 

^ 


.ill 

jfl 


1 
o. 3 

ao 

d 1=1 
o ■=* 

o 


1 

11 
r 


1 


S 
^ 




r 


.0074 
.00910 


.00272 
.00270 


.01806 
.01789 


.00116 
.00337 


.02529 
.02445 




.00116 
.00204 


.00116 
.00543 


.00273 
.00359 


.00239 
.00055 




.03273 
.03606 


.00467 
.00591 


.0126 
0025 


.0055 

.0036 

.0015 

.00785 

.0001 


.0242 

.01500 

.0169 

.03011 

.0229 

.0193 


.00220 


.03580 


.00273 


.00249 


.00498 


.00355 




.04955 


.00260 


.0072 

.00858 

.0078 

.0042 


.0009 

.00307 

.0022 

.0043 


.01769 
.04188 
.02989 

.01924 


.00498 
.00395 
.00070 

.00526 


.00277 
.00096 
.00117 

.00175 


.00363 
.00539 
.00146 

.00433 


.00580 
.00247 
.00242 

*. 00085 


.00280 


.03487 
.05465 
.03564 

.03253 


.01767 
.00007 
.00080 

.01893 










.01233 
.04998 
.02456 


.00151 
.00340 
.00265 


.00153 
.00308 
.00176 


.00064 
.00190 
.00147 




.00088 
.00230 
.00253 


.01689 
.06066 
.03297 


00798 










t. 00423 
00452 








































































.00617 


.00143 


.00959 


.00181 


.00133 


.00241 


.00166 


.00206 


.01886 


00645 

































.00543 

.00201 

.00711 

.00071 

.0035 

.00810 

.00548 

.00233 


.00194 

.00093 

.00157 

.00021 

.0007 

.00040 

.00333 

.00265 


.010506 

.01019 

.01176 

.00994 

.0101 

.01870 

.0793 

.00908 


.00032 

.00141 

.00067 

.00055 

.0036 

.00220 

.00226 

.00368 


.01328 
.01019 
.01601 
.00995 
.01007 
.02538 
.01537 
.02159 

.01756 

.01887 
.03098 
.04687 

.01412 
.00639 

.01573 

.02843 
.02459 
.02511 
.02898 

.04998 
.00639 


.00207 
.00190 
.00170 
.00093 
.00432 
.00104 
.00203 
.00137 

.00266 

.00138 
.00132 
.00009 

.00474 
.00101 

.00123 

.00181 
.00165 
.00155 
.00245 

.00526 
.00009 


.00197 
.00162 
.00185 

"! 00239 
.00089 
.00212 
.00302 

.00190 

.00132 
.00166 
.00010 

.00232 
.00053 

.00029 

.00141 
.00375 
.00334 
.00296 

.00543 
.00010 


.00149 
.00110 
.00246 
.00085 
.00627 
.00446 
.00180 
.00296 

.00235 

.00288 
.00604 
.00202 

.00547 
.00213 

.00109 

.00307 
.00361 
.00480 
.00436 

.00627 
.00064 


.00088 
.00310 
.00223 
.00127 
.00446 
.00353 
.00473 

.00015 


.00270 
.00342 
.00186 
.00035 
.00879 
.00163 
.00242 
.00303 


.02239 
.02133 
.02611 
.01335 
.03630 
.03693 
.02847 
.03197 

.02462 

.02445 
.04445 
.05080 

.02790 
.01280 

.01860 

.03767 
.03758 
.03779 
.03932 

.06066 
.01280 


.00846 
.00962 
.00596 
.00292 
.02825 
.00116 
.00503 
.00866 

00503 










.01645 


.01143 
.00942 


.00129 
.00322 


.02310 
.02949 


.00172 
.00244 

.02665 


.00250 
.00144 

■"66244 

*. 00050 

.00091 
*. 00062 
*. 00279 
*. 00146 

.00580 
.00015 


.66195 
.00028 

.00125 
.00030 

.00076 

.00204 
.00460 
.00578 
.00203 

.00879 
.00028 


.00651 
.01864 

.00710 








.00414 


.0031 

.0066 
.0056 
.0076 
.0108 

.0126 
.00201 


.00785 
.0001 


.0113 

.0212 
.0232 
.0198 
.0212 

.03011 
.00617 


.0026 

.0046 
.0048 
.0015 
.0023 

.02665 
.00032 


.00080 

.00702 
.01465 
.01520 
.01663 

.02825 
.00007 



188 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND EX 

Year 

CLASS "B." ELECTRIC UTIL 



Location 



Name op Utility 



^1 



£p2 



o 



Attica 

Auburn 

Bluffton 

Columbia City. . 
Crawfordsville. . 

Adams 

Frankfort 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Greenfield 

Kendallville 

Lawrenceburg . . 

Linton 

Martinsville. . . . 

Mitchell 

New Castle 

Portland 

Rushville 

Tell City 

Tipton 

Washington . . . . 

Alexandria 

Dunkirk 

Gas City 

Hartford 

Bedford 

Lebanon 

Seymour 

BoonvilJQ 

Brazil 

W. Terre Haute, 

Clinton 

Clinton 

Clinton 

Sullivan 

Connersville 

Franklin 

Goshen 

Greencastle . . . . 

Greensburg 

Jasonville 

Seymour 

Madison 

Martinsville 

Mt. Vernon 

Noblesville 

Plymouth 

Princeton 

Rochester 

Union City 

Valparaiso 

Wabash 

Warsaw 

Winchester 

Liberty 



(a) municipally owned 



Municipal Light and Water Plant 

Municipal Water and Electric Light 

Works 

Municipal Water, Light & Power Plant . . 

Municipal Electric Light Department 

Municipal Electric Light & Power Co 

Municipal Electric Light & Power Plant. . 

Municipal City Light and Power Co 

Municipal Water & Electric Light Dept. . 

Municipal Water and Electric Co 

Municipal Elect. Plant & Water Works. . . 
Municipal Electric Light & Power Plant. . 
Municipal Electric Light Department. . . . 
Lawrenceburg Elect. Light Department. . 
Municipal Elect. Light & Power Plant . . . 

Municipal Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Water and Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Light Plant 

Tell City Light Department 

Tipton Electric Light Plant 

Municipal Electric Works 



1,546,540 

1,786,922 
2,522,630 
1,216,260 
4,951,196 



1,280,280 

1,341,988 

2,232,583 

688,235 

3,969,347 



.04089 

.04632 
.03422 
.06059 
.03382 



5,173,508 
611,180 



4,509,796 
484,514 



.04135 
.07459 



794,400 
672,800 



578,613 
475,955 



.05751 



806,250 



638,160 



.06835 



443,225 
2,232,610 



427,165 
1,325,285 



.01831 
.05830 



674,561 
1,157,900 
1,233,250 



337,902 
1,079,115 



.06945 
.05588 



(b) privately owned 



Indiana General Service Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Indiana General Ser-vice Co 

Indiana General Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Boonville Elect. Light and Power Co 

T. H. I. cfc E. Traction Co 

T. H. I. & E. Traction Co 

Wabash Valley Elect. Co. (General) . . 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (Clinton) . . . 
Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (Surburban) 

Wabash Valley Elec. Co. (Sullivan) J 

Hydro-Elec. Light & Power Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Hawks Electric Co. (System) 

Putnam Electric Co 

Greensburg Gas and Electric Co 

Wabash Valley Electric Co 

Jackson County Transmission Co 

Madison Light and Railways Co 

Martinsville Gas and Electric Co 

Mt. Vernon Elec. Light and Power Co. . . 

Noblesville Heat, Light & Power Co 

Plymouth Electric Light & Power Co 

Princeton Electric Light & Power Co ... . 

United Public Service Co 

Union City Electric Co 

Valparaiso Lighting Co 

Wabash Water and Light Co 

Winona Electric Light & Water Co 

Citizens Heat, Light and Power Co 

Liberty Light and Power Co 



Maximum . 
Mininum. . 



1,823,240 

1,600,940 

1,611,410 

503,350 



1,457,918 

1,288,139 

1,434,988 

447,170 



.05643 
.06343 
.04188 
.06738 



7,391,829 



5,593,328 



.05053 



5,964,267 

1,483,600 

6,001,368 

914,892 

845,000 



602,730 
1,594,130 
1,339,040 

766,180 
2,850,322 
2,239,051 



1.561,056 
1,327,584 
1,558,622 
3,351,439 
1,727,852 
739,307 
1,402,000 

7,391,829 
443,225 



4,589,104 
877,519 

4,769,358 
689,217 
589,165 

1,317,052 
602,730 

1,084,412 
856,574 
609,326 

1,890,435 

1,855,154 



.04818 
.04974 
.03679 
.08005 
.06480 



.02451 
.06110 
.05830 
.06533 
.07586 
.05981 



1,278,064 
1,278,626 
1,335,590 
2,125,715 
1,227,852 
591,446 
1,051,500 

5,593,328 
337,902 



.07338 
.04972 
.06877 
.06474 
.07277 
.06621 
.05659 

.08005 
.01831 



♦Credit, tl>.eficit. 



Public Service Commission 



189 



PENSES PER UNIT— Continued 

1920 

ITIES PER K. W. H. SOLD 



Operating Expenses per K. W. H. Sold 


1 


Classification I 


Classification II 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 




i 


1 
1 


1 


1 






§11 
ill 


' 

g § a 



|| 

gt3 


.2 

1 



1 


1 


3 

55 


0112 


.0012 

.0017 
.0003 


.0169 

.0210 
.0134 


.0032 
.0003 " 


.02669 

.03060 
.01817 
.06558 
.01923 


.00185 

.00196 
.00144 
.00440 
.00072 


.00119 

.00064 
.00047 
.00153 
.00071 


.00263 

.00114 
.0036b 
.00380 
,00337 






.0.3236 

.03915 
.02719 
.07531 
.02731 


00853 


.0095 
.0051 


■ .00481 
.00345 




.00717 

.00703 

t. 01472 

.00651 


.0080 


.0008 


.0142 




.00328 




.00651 


.00361 
.008512 


.01604 
.036873 


.00103 
.002354 


.02269 
.04257 


.00271 
.00251 


.00085 
.00339 


.00289 
.00589 


.00245 




.03159 
05436 


.00976 
. 02023 














.0183 
.04580 


.01015 


.02535 
.06970 


. 00398 
.00281 


.00295 
.00077 


.00809 
.00143 


.00882 
.00338 




.04919 
.07809 


. 00832 


.01431 


.00143 


t. 01180 


























0032 


.0036 


.0166 


.0143 


.03978 


.00334 


.00161 


.00672 






.05145 


.01690 


































.0045 


.0011 


.0199 


.0017 


.2227 
.05194 


.00083 
.00436 


.00360 
.00052 


.00144 
.00343 


.00208 




.03022 
.06025 


t. 01191 
f. 00195 















02421 


.01456 


.03015 


.00835 


.06739 
.04674 


.00742 
.00214 


.00332 
.00183 


.00698 
.00167 


.01028 
.00277 




.09539 
.05515 


t. 02594 
00073 













































































































.0025 
.0211 
.0001 
.0222 


'.'6625" 
.0057 


.0260 
.0430 
.0187 
.0114 


.0097 
.0069 
.0030 
.0035 


.02766 
.06342 
.02342 
.02781 


.00464 
.00237 
.00230 
.00699 


.00399 
.00276 
.00189 
.00155 


.00618 
.00676 
.00412 
.01294 


*. 00203 

*. 00163 

*. 00102 

.00579 


.00543 
.00278 
.00369 
.00851 


.04587 
.07646 
.03440 
.06359 


.01056 
.01303 
.00748 
.00379 


















































.0108 


.0022 


.0142 


.0057 


.02021 


.00248 


.00376 


.00796 


.00589 


.00270 


.04300 


.00753 


.0091 
.0044 
.012590 
.0072 


.0024 

■.000802 
.0025 


.0216 
.0213 
.012592 
.0351 


.0042 
.0040 
.002322 
.0043 


.03129 
.02128 
.02052 
.03513 
.02670 


.00095 
.00402 
.00167 
.00657 
.00212 


.00167 
.00293 
.00319 

".'00267 


.00588 
.00515 
.00676 
.•01290 
.00607 


.00375 
*. 00136 
.00367 
.00849 
.00871 


.00165 
.00297 
.00168 
.00261 
.00276 


.04519 
.03499 
.03758 
.06570 
.04903 


.00299 
.01475 
t. 00079 
.01435 
.01577 






.0149 

.016561 

.02982 

.026807 

.0264 

.0302 

.018108 


.0119 

; 00400 ' 

.002515 

.0060 

.0037 

.008053 








.01656 
.04040 
.03771 
.04679 
.05233 
.02923 






.00100 
.00949 
.00662 
.00537 
.00976 
.00917 


.00158 

".'06413 
.00398 
.00540 
.00728 


.00035 
.00144 
.00266 
.00526 
.00380 
.00359 


.01949 
.05523 
.05615 
.06892 
.07813 
.05265 


.00502 


.01471 
.013436 

■;6i73" 

.011976 


.00236 
.002853 
.0043 
.0070 


.00130 
.00380 
.00205 
.00305 
.00150 


.00260 
.00123 
.00547 
.00379 
.00188 


.00587 

.00215 

t. 00359 

t. 00227 

.00716 


.0072 
.0020 
.0067 
.0163 


.0066 
.0034 

■.■66i6' 


.0296 
.0158 
.0279 
.0360 


.0100 
.0017 
.0025 
.0036 


.04059 
.01577 
.02642 
.04815 
.05095 
.02799 
.02256 

.06970 
.01577 


.00297 
.00426 
.00273 
.00269 
.00250 
.005o3 
.01131 

.01131 
.00072 


.00256 
.00097 
.00228 
.00241 
.00120 
.00149 
.00074 

.00547 
.00047 


.01283 
.00800 
.00541 
.00926 
.01038 
.00646 
.01176 

.01294 
.00100 


.00438 
.00738 
.00010 

".'664i6 
.02067 
.00409 

.02067 
.00158 


.00335 
.00169 
.00259 
.00578 
.00204 
.00113 
.00192 

.00851 
.00035 


.06668 
.03807 
.03953 
.06829 
.07123 
.06637 
.05238 

.09539 
.01949 


.00670 
.01165. 
.02924 
t. 00355 
.00154 


.0113 


.0019 


.0173 


.0070 


t. 00016 
.00421 


.02421 
.0001 


.01456 
.0003 


.04580 
.0114 


.0143 
.0003 


.02924 
.00073 



190 



Year Book 



IX. 



REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

r 



CLASS "A." GAS 





Name op Utility 


11 


13 

1 

If 
ll 


1 




Location 


1 


Anderson . . 


Central Indiana Gas Co 


294,151 


284,732 


.98128 


.02711 


East Chicago 

Elkhart , . 


Central Indiana Gas Co 




Elkhart Gas and Fuel Co 


177,455 


159,443 

71,785 
335,817 
753,587 
369,286 
538,807 

80,793 
3,051,636 

40,561 
274,043 
194,588 

75,192 
116,713 
271,641 
117,374 


1.80034 
1.19624 
1.60552 
1.06271 

.93726 
1.05139 
1.70930 
2.69264 
2.19799 

.77803 
1.59238 
1.81710 
1.47055 

.87237 
1.69576 


.0680 


Elwood 


Central Indiana Gas Co 


02649 


Evansville 


Public Utilities Co 


380,011 
870,658 
388,097 
596,852 

85,636 
3,389,543 

46,770 
308,932 
208,841 

80,978 
132,739 
297,612 
132,244 


.0197 


Fort Wayne 






Gary 


Gary Heat, Light and Water Co 

No. Ind. Gas and Electric Co 


.1002 






Huntington 


Huntington Light and Fuel Co 


.0668 




Citizens Gas Co 


.0973 


Jeffersonville 


United Gas and Electric Co 








.0455 


Lafayette . . . . 


No. Ind. Gas and Electric Co ... 








.0793 


Logansport . . . 


No. Ind. Gas and Electric Co 








.01963 


Michigan City . . 


No. Ind. Gas and Electric Co. . 




Mishawaka 


No. Ind Gas and Electric Co 




Muncie 


Central Indiana Gas Co .... 




1,082,477 

81,944 

257,885 

79,459 

356,124 

671,214 

577,021 

*113,710 

457,803 

3,051,636 
40,561 


.54561 
2.08427 


.00950 


New Albany 




91,243 
281,029 

84,372 
365,974 
733,632 
614,542 
143,849 




Peru 


No Tnrl ri-nsj nnrl Fllpptrir" 0,n 




Peru 


Peru Gas Co 


1.43510 

.64728 
1.12719 

.70818 
1.69978 

.48448 

2.69264 
.48448 




Richmond 

South Bend 


Richmond Light. Heat and Power Co 

No. Ind. Gas and Electric Co 


.0272 


Terre Haute . . . 


Citizens Gas and Fuel Co 


.0188 




Central States Gas Co 








.00014 




MaxiTniiTTi , 


3,389,543 
46,770 


.1002 






.00014 









*Includes amount used by company. 
tDeficit. 



Public Sei?vice Commission 



191 



PER 1,000 CUBIC FEET SOLD 

1920 

UTILITIES 



Classification I 


Classification II 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 




I'- 


1 


1 




g 

1 


d 


1 


6 


General and Un- 
distributed, in- 
cluding Munic- 
ipal Lighting 


.2 

1 


e2 


3 
e2 


ll 

id 

■£- 


. 14643 


.04436 


.38168 


.06125 


.48046 


.08326 


.05504 


.05011 




.04808 


.71695 


.26433 


.3638 
. 16874 
.3058 


.0936 

.16734 

.0965 


.8786 
. 64163 
.5367 


.0958 
.06821 
.4172 


1.28560 

.84333 

1.08366 

. 76162 

.30287 

.75380 

1.19027 

2.11985 

1.68113 

.39456 

.88409 

.98889 

.95601 

.50949 

1.34526 


.05690 
.13412 
. 14417 
.04729 
.07285 
. 10772 
.07467 
. 10751 
. 15563 
.04075 
.09135 
.09374 
. 10443 
.06408 
.11816 


.03407 
.05379 
.07188 
.06957 
.02586 
.08338 
.04858 
.03448 
.06554 
.02474 
.06514 
.03512 
.11495 
.03984 
.09869 


. 13399 
.04896 
.08116 
.04772 
.11162 
.04057 
. 16504 
.03588 
. 15476 
.23015 
.04682 
.25615 
. 16557 
.03627 
.06408 


'■.11911 

■■.'67927 

■.'68664 
.07358 
.04439 
.00585 

■.07343 


. 10571 
.08478 
. 13493 
.05020 
.11379 
.05987 
.08341 
.10318 

■■.03992 
.07825 
.07193 
.07673 
.05037 
.11263 


1.61627 
1.16498 
1.63491 

.97640 

. 70626 
1.04534 
1.64861 
2.47448 
2.10145 

.73597 
1.16565 
1.51926 
1.41769 

.70005 
1.73882 


. 18407 

.03126 

t. 02939 

08631 


.0860 


.0108 


.1721 


.1383 


.23100 
00605 


.5034 
.3351 


.0165 
.0844 


.8238 
1.4867 


.1071 
.1621 


.06069 
.21816 
09654 


.0503 


.0177 


.3946 


.0270 


.04206 
42673 


.4994 


.0191 


.7109 


.0548 


.29784 
05286 


.13004 


.03821 


.40012 


.05587 


. 17232 
t 04306 












.03891 


.02808 


.33247 


.01642 


.35802 
1.59838 


.03333 
. 14280 


.01930 
.06018 


.01757 
. 14273 


".03661 


.03157 


.45979 
1.98070 


.08582 
10357 




















.91326 
.39930 
. 66407 
.25500 
1.27928 
.28341 

2.11985 
.25500 


.04398 
.02607 
.09516 
.03793 
.08785 
.00268 

. 15563 
.00268 


. 12533 
.02840 
.08799 
.03674 
.05633 
.00029 

. 12533 
.00029 


.05294 
. 05342 
.03105 
.11480 
.22098 
.00027 

.25615 
.00027 


■■.'62527 

■'.'04939 
.06761 

.11911 
.00585 


.07613 
.06611 
.04353 
.07850 
.08244 
.00030 

. 13493 
.00030 


1.21164 
.59857 
.92180 
.57236 

1.79449 
.28695 

2.47448 
.28695 


22346 


.0375 


.0141 


.3583 


.0650 


.04871 
20539 


.1232 


.0051 


.1586 


.0992 


. 13582 
09471 


.00086 

.5034 
.00086 


.00014 

. 16734 
.00014 


.28516 

1.4867 
.1586 


.00033 

.4172 
.00033 


. 19753 

42673 
.00605 



192 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND EXPENSES PER 

Year 

CLASS "B." GAS 



Location 



Alexandria 

Aurora 

Auburn 

Bedford 

Bloomington . . 

Bluffton 

Brazil 

Columbus 

Connersville, . . 
Fairmount. . . . 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Greencastle 

Greenfield 

Hartford City. 
Kendallville . . . 
Lawrenceburg. . 

Lebanon 

Linton 

Liberty 

Loogootee 

Madison 

Martinsville. . . 
Middletown . . . 
New Castle — 
Noblesville. . . . 
Normt^lCity.. . 

Plymouth 

Princeton 

Riverside 

Rochester 

Selina 

Sesonour 

Shelbyville . . . . 

Tipton 

Union City 

Valparaiso. . . . 

Wabash 

Washington , . . 

Warsaw 

Whiting 

Winchester. . . . 

Suburban 

Rushville 

Crawfordsville. 
Decatur 



Name of Utility 



Central Indiana Gas Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Indiana Fuel and Light Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Central Indiana Lighting Co , 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co 

Brazil Gas Co : 

Columbus Gas Light Co 

Peoples Service Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co. (Natural Gas) 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co , 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Indiana Fuel and Light Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Goshen Gas Co : 

Greencastle Gas and Electric Co 

Interstate Public Service Co (Natural Gas) . . , 

Central Indiana Gas Co. (Natural Gas) 

Indiana Fuel and Light Co 

Lawrenceburg Gas Co 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co 

Linton Gas and Coke Co 

Liberty Gas Light and Fuel Co 

Loogootee Gas Fuel Co 

Madison Light and Fuel Co 

Martinsville Gas and Electric Co 

Middletown Gas Co. (Natural Gas) 

Interstate Public Service Co. (Natural Gas).. 

Indiana Gas Light Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co 

Princeton Utilities Co 

Central Indiana Gas Co 

Rochester Gas and Fuel Co 

Selina Gas Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Interstate Publ'c Service Co 

Indiana Gas Light Co. (Natural Gas) 

Union Heat, Light and Power Co 

Valparaiso Light Co 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co 

Washington Water, Light and Power Co ... . 

Warsaw Gas Co _ 

Northern Indiana Gas andElectric Co 

Union Heat, Light & Power Co. (Natural Gas) 

Central Indiana Gas Co. (Natural Gas) 

Rushville Natural Gas Co. (Natural Gas) . . . 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co 



Maximum . 
Minimum . 






5,500 
72,473 
30,749 
51,443 



21,715 
46,419 
46,874 



98,824 

12,523 

See Combin 



54,801 
12,227 
28,732 



Combin 
'4i;537 



5,220 



17,480 
14,322 



178,427 
52,745 



17,268 



17,423 



31,290 
41,397 



41, 



21,376 

32,885 

combined wi 



60,775 



178,427 
5,220 



39,283 
3,784 
62.035 
26,036 

44,067. 

33,170. 
19,109 
41,718 
38,073 
28,025 
52,924 
10,454 
Report un 



50,162 
10,819 
28,292 
106,571 
Report un 



38,527 



4,377 



16,385 
12,263 
8,819 
174,013 
38,800 



16,042 
11,299 



16,171 



28,719 
35,528 



37,364 
56,800 
15,252 
27,712 
' Hammon 



457,802 
52,233 
51,588 
21,511 

457,802 
3,784 



p. 

2 

2'^ 



Oo 

6 



1.25601 
2.71961 

2.3800 
1.77409 

.97213 
1.41627 
2.46878 
1.88800 
1.74000 

.43483 

1.41864 

1.99222 

der"Aub 



1.89260 

2.29694 

.78368 

.48969 

ler"Aub 



1.38262 



2.17173 



2.10189 
1.58578 
1.08858 
.37887 
1.54641 



1.68992 
2.04879 



2.23308 



1.83853 
1.25553 



2.11124 
1.49875 
1.80939 
2.32327 
d' report 



.48449 

.5000 

2.21978 

1.44486 

2.71961 

.37887 



.02802 



.5508 
.0410 



.0916 



.0764 
.01792 



.0465 



urn 



.1062 
.2122 
.0585 
.00803 
urn" 



,1187 



.0734 



.0189 
.1049 



,1087 



.0495 



.0497 
.0589 



.0711 



.0525 
.1370 

lS3 'A' 



.00014 
.0747 



.4508 
.00014 



jDeficit. 
♦Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



193 



1,000 CUBIC FEET SOLD— Contmued 
1920 

utilities 



Operating Expenses per 1,000 Cubic Feet Sold 




Classification I 


Classification 11 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 




!- 


1 


"3 

1 


^1 


1 
.1 


a 
.2 


§ 

1 
1 


fe 


General and Un- 
distributed, in- 
cluding Munic- 
ipal Liehtiuff 


1 
1 


H 


.2 


II 
1" 


.18119 


.16889 


. 64071 


.67241 


.84344 
2.60360 
1.49696 
1.75660 
1.03021 

.76574 
1.43351 
1.21394 


.13759 
.16657 
.07377 
.11713 
.06294 
.28300 
.16829 
.06829 


.05691 
.03730 
.05423 
.05352 
.04069 
.11569 
.00621 
.08733 


.05180 
.17939 
.31786 
. 13099 
.06707 
.16746 
.38364 
.18230 


■*. 03540 
.09376 
.00174 

*. 01158 

■.12112 
.08319 


.08480 
.11594 
.12818 
.11522 
.08551 
.07321 
.30328 
.08629 


1.17454 
3.06740 
2.16476 
2.17520 
1.27484 
1.40510 
2.41605 
1.72134 


.08147 
t. 34779 
.21524 
t.4011 
t. 30271 
.01117 
.07073 
.16666 


.7534 




1.0576 

1.0259 

.7949 


.2053 
.0530 
.1371 


.2123 




.6659 
.4767 


.0543 
.0546 


".'865i' 


1.1237 
.1554 


.4130 
.05261 


.1005 
.01734 


i.6239 
.28519 


.1136 
.20007 


1.49221 
.28341 
.79834 

1.70710 


.05691 
.04259 
.08498 
.08799 


.01002 
.03639 

. 12288 
.05227 


.16959 
.3313 
.08114 
. 14900 


'*. '61833 


.02413 
.03825 
.11824 
.08609 


1.75556 

.43377 

1.20558 

2.07012 


t. 01556 
.00106 
.21306 

t. 07790 


.04653 




1.2295 


.02151 


.6096 
.6730 
.1942 
.02389 


.0977 
,0659 

".■66777 


1.2658 

1.0310 

.2924 

.28510 


.0412 
.3045 
.1404 
.00909 


1.83036 

1.82885 

.47830 

.28341 


.07455 
.12310 
.07116 
.02038 


.03980 
.08873 
.04854 
.01632 


.20237 
.27035 
.09659 
.01485 


.4426 

.8873 

*. 00690 


.10598 
.11053 
.08129 
.01714 


2.29732 

2.51029 

.76898 

.35210 


t. 40472 

t. 21335 

.01470 

.13759 


































.79518 


.11671 


.16369 


.14898 




.06150 


1.22606 


'■■.15656 










.5621 


.1042 




1.3397 


1.74056 


.23248 


.02970 


.16498 




.02033 


2.18805 


t. 01632 










1.37762 

1.09794 

.54045 

.24425 

.84827 


.06826 
.04660 
.14174 
.01501 
.10742 


.01381 
.06149 

.'01788 
.05400 


.31959 
.37099 
.27713 
.02973 
.23906 


.09175 
.07000 

'*.■ 00996 
.25773 


.09229 

.09209 

.2278 

.01385 

.12762 


1.89132 

1.73911 

.98210 

.31076 

1.63410 


.21057 

t. 15383 

.10648 

.06811 

t. 08769 


.3874 


.0285 


.9844 


.0913 


.0184 
.1913 


■■■0904' 


.2372 
.7084 


.0216 
.1207 










1.01839 
1.45576 


. 12152 
.04483 


. 13448 
.03625 


.05688 
.30696 


".■26338 


.15716 
. 13704 


1.48843 
2.18422 




.3313 


.0656 


1.1120 


.1540 


. 13543 


.5740 


.0218 


.8900 


.3700 


1.50466 


.16235 


.2910 


.23995 


.05936 


.10887 


2.10429 


.12879 


.3334 
.2014 


.1268 


.9952 
.7716 


.1072 
.0582 


1.41355 
.95325 


.08441 
.06302 


.03409 
.04067 


.12081 
. 11227 


.02011 
*.01976 


. 10822 
.13511 


1.78119 
1.28474 


.05734 
t. 02921 


























.7314 


.1546 




.8944 


1.54437 

.96579 

1.41221 

2.02599 


.12102 
.14181 
.14174 
.08474 


.05912 
.11962 
.05400 
.05672 


.13803 
. 18649 
.15639 
.26949 


.00458 

■■.12565 
.04691 


.16010 
.07814 
. 16388 
.10731 


2.02722 
1.49185 
2 05327 
2.59116 


.08402 
00690 


.5536 
.4670 


.1006 
.1133 


.8837 
1.5560 


.1642 
.1350 


t. 24388 
t. 26789 


























.00086 


.00014 
.0137 


.28516 
.0052 


.00033 
.0642 


















.0122 




















1.25534 

.76227 

2.60360 
.24425 


.11346 
.35119 

.35119 
.01501 


.11527 
. 16409 

. 16409 
.00621 


.07005 
. 16600 

.38364 
.01485 


.25773 
.00174 


.11684 
. 10572 

.30328 
.01385 


1.67096 
1.54927 

3.06740 
.31076 


54882 










t 10441 


.7314 
.00086 


.16889 
.00014 


1.5560 
.0052 


1.3397 
.00033 


.54882 
.00690 



r 



13—19980 



194 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND 

Year 

HOT WATER 





Name of Utility 


g - 

1 

1 

11 

¥ 


1 

11 

is 




Location 


1 


Bedford 


Interstate Public Service Co 


















Boonville 


Boonville Electric Light and Power Co 


39,761 
154,678 


.21619 
.36370 


0155 


Crawfordsville 


Crawfordsville Heating Co 


015163 


Elwood 


Indiana General Service Co 




Fowler 










Frankfort 


Frankfort Heating Co 


260,666 
458,602 
230,002 
176,302 


.30424 
.33768 
.30781 
.31879 


0198 


Indianapolis 


Merchants Heat and Light Co 


016563 


Lafayette 




0085 






.01216 




Interstate Public Service Co 
















Interstate Public Service Co 








New Castle 


Interstate Public Service Co 


42,500 
85,177 


.30210 
.37200 


0024 


Peru 




03307 


Princeton 


Princeton Light and Power Co 




Terra Haute 




211,102 

458,602 
39,761 


.30543 

.37200 
.21619 


.0216 






.03307 




Minimum . . 


0024 









tDeficit. 
*Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



195 



EXPENSES— Continued 



HEATING 



Opbbatino Expenses per Square Foot Connected 



Classification I 



Classification II 



2*3 






Depreciation 
and Taxes 



P40 



F 



.0412 
.051637 



.0029 
.018873 



.0703 
.200490 



.0239 
.013660 



11831 



.00290 
.00963 



.00535 
.00085 



.02727 
.02116 



.04527 
.02263 



.01601 



.23539 
.33846 



t. 01920 
.02524 



.0099 



.0284 
.052601 
.0416 
.01568 



1375 

194488 

1882 

12798 



.0076 
.031714 
.0617 
.01168 



, 18444 

.27580 
,27489 
. 18850 



.01363 
.01373 
.01439 
.00791 



.02551 



.01434 
.01187 
.00613 



.00954 
.02605 



.03927 



.01272 
.02073 
.00776 
.01682 



.26422 
.35122 
.31845 
.28468 



.04002 
t. 01354 
t. 01064 

.03411 



.0016 
.0506 



.02327 



.0106 
.1935 



.0172 
.02042 



.27642 
.29731 



.00970 
.00483 



.01553 



.02582 
.02111 



.00865 
.02348 



.01202 
.03156 



.33084 
,37867 



t. 02874 
t. 00667 



.0510 



.06065 
.0016 



.0417 



.052601 
.0029 



1418 



.200490 
.0106 



.0091 



.0617 
.0076 



,21076 



,29731 
. 11831 



.00007 



.01439 
.00007 



.00291 



.01553 
.00038 



.02505 



.02727 
.00954 



.04419 



.04527 
.02263 



.00873 



.03629 
.00776 



29171 



.37867 
.23539 



.01372 



.04002 
.01372 



196 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND EXPENSES, HEATING UTILI 

Year 

STEAM 





Name of Utility 




II 








Location 


1 


Anderson 


"Central Heating Co .... . 


104,746 


.55410 


02894 




Batesville Electric Light and Power Co 




Columbia City 


Municipal Heating Plant .... 












185,579 

No Data. 

No Data. 

151,429 

489,841 

1,011,052 


.28005 


.003593 


Goshen 


Municipal Heating Plant . 




Hope 


Pulse and Porter Electric Light Plant 

Huntington Light and Fuel Co . . 






Huntington 


.30424 
.38197 

.45817 


0184 




.000365 




Merchants Heat and Light Co . ... 


007587 








Logansport 


Logansoprt Heat and Power Co .... 


104,271 


.53196 


03675 






Noblesville . .. 


Noblesville Heat, Light and Power Co . . . ... 


44,683 


.34641 


0226 




Mooresville Utilities Co 




Muncie . . . 


Indiana General Service Co 


480,024 
No Data 
No Data 

139,071 


.39300 










Rochester 


United Public Service Co 






South Bend 




.58544 




Terre Haute 


T. H. I. &. E. Traction Co 




Thorntown 


Municipal Heating Plant 








Warsaw 


Winona Electric Light and Water Co ... ... 


No Data 

1,011,052 
44,683 








Maximum 


.58544 
.28005 


03675 






.000365 









tDeficit. 



Public Service Commission 



197 



TIES, PER SQUARE FEET OF RADIATION CONNECTED 

1920 

HEATING 



Operating Expenses per 1,000 Cubic Feet Sold 




Classification I 


Classification II 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 




k 

1(3 

■P 


1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


r 


§ 

'S 

.2 

Q 


■h 


ll 
1.1 
II 


i 


P 

e2 




.09244 


.00106 


.30424 


.05414 


.42111 


.01916 


.00005 


.05457 


.05665 


.00928 


.56082 


t. 00672 


























.050583 


.004290 


.107892 


.037606 


. 14756 


.02847 


.01260 


.01542 


.04311 


.03313 


.28029 


t. 00024 


























.0462 
.095719 
041153 


.0026 

.041356 

.048459 


.2080 

.231179 

.216033 


.0058 

.011656 

.032047 


.25394 
.35716 
.31421 


.00260 
.01718 
.00906 


.00399 
.00478 
.01114 


.02471 
.00132 
.01198 


.02162 
.04256 


.01282 
.01835 
.02078 


.31968 
.44135 
.36717 


t. 01544 

t. 05938 

.09100 


.09309 


.05303 


.34526 


.08177 


.49312 


.05017 


.00929 


.06239 


.02417 


.00628 


.64542 


t. 11346 


.0096 


.0288 


.2324 


.0006 


.23806 


.01065 


.00493 


.04028 


.02792 




.32184 


.02457 


.0181 


.0107 


.2158 


.0230 


.23492 


.02752 


.00653 


.00461 


.01692 


.01747 


.30797 


.08503 


























.019948 




.393701 


.039388 


.39476 


.03681 


,00557 


.02060 


.02984 


.03227 


.51985 


.06559 


















































.095719 
.0096 


.05303 
.00106 


. 393701 
. 107892 


.08177 
.0006 


.49312 
. 14756 


.05017 
.00260 


.01260 
.00005 


.06239 
.00132 


.05665 
.01692 


.03313 
.00628 


.64542 
.28029 


.09100 
.02457 



198 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND 

For the 

CLASS "A." TELE 



Location 



Name of Utility 



Om 



New York. . . . 
Hammond. . . . 
Terre Haute . . 

Kokomo 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

Wakarusa . . . . 

Ft. Wayne 

Indianapolis. . 
Lafayette .... 

Laporte 

Logansport . . . 

Valparaiso 

Chesterton. . . 

Hobart 

Kouts 

Miller 

Wheeler 

Richmond. . . . 
Evansville. . . . 
Winchester . . . 

Bluffton 

Knox 

Bryan, Ohio . . 
Louisville, Ky. 
New Albany . . 
Indianapolis. . 

Brazil 

Wabash 

Michigan City 

SejTnour 

Chicago 



American Telephone and Telegraph Co 

Illinois Bell Telephone Co : . 

Citizens Independent Telephone Co . 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Home Telephone Co. of Elkhart County 

Home Telephone Co. of Elkhart County 

Home Telephone Co. of Elkhart County 

Home Telephone and Telegraph Co 

Indianapolis Telephone Co 

Lafayette Telephone Co 

Laporte Telephone Co 

Logansport Home Telephone Co 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Co 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Co 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Co 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Co 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Co 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Qo 

Richmond Home Telephone Co 

Southern Telephone Co. of Indiana 

Eastern Indiana Telephone Co 

United Teleplione Co 

Winona Telephone Co. (Combined) 

Williams County Telephone Co 

Independent Long Distance Telephone and Telegraph Co 

Louisville Home Telephone Co 

Central Union Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Clay County 

Home Telephone Co 

Merchants Mutual Telephone Co 

Southern Indiana Telephone and Telegraph Co 

Central Union Telephone Co 

Maximum 

Minimum 



No Data. 
15,395 
11,057 

No Data. 

4,61i 
2,284 

No Data. 
17,122 

Sold to Indi 

6,828 

5,284 

4,863 

2,097 

480 

770 

241 

No Data.. . . 

78 

4,532 

No Data . . . 
4,290 

No Data . . . 
4,143 
3,756 

Toll only... 
3,288 

Sold to Indi 
2,310 
2,850 
2,931 
3,966 
30,886 

30,886 

78 



45.0191 
33.2001 



24.3853 
23.7014 



28.9097 
ana Bell 
26.0836 
23.7884 
25.5135 
26.2354 
24.6721 
24.8079 
21.2442 



23.3650 



23.4177 
22.9751 



30.3704 
ana Bell 
30.1093 
25.7652 
25.9273 
19.2062 
41.8949 

45.0191 
19.2062 



tDefieit. 



Public Service Commission 



199 



EXPENSES— Coutinued 
Year 1920 
PHONE UTILITES 



Operating Expenses per Station 




Classification I 


Classification II 


1 


S 
1 

S 


S 


■•1 


1 


1 
1 

1 


11 




s 


11 

i| 


If 

if 





If 
































8.6169 
5.2522 




19.7553 
10.8579 


14.3949 
10.1744 


5.3829 
2.7838 


1.6161 
1.5301 


2.7344 

3.0355 


43.8836 
28.3817 


1.1355 








4.8184 










1.7849 
2.0459 


7.023i 
7.7196 


1.0511 
.8519 


3.5819 
3.7227 


3.449i 
3.3764 


7.8116 
7.0599 


5.6164 
7.2048 


2.0947 
1.6675 


i.3673 
1.8128 


1.7978 
2 0308 


18 6878 
19.7758 


5.6975 
3.9256 


2.4631 

Telepho 

1.4477 

1.1497 


15.0847 

ne Co. — 

6.1005 

10.7543 


1.7430 
March 3 


3.3505 

1, 1920— 

3.5149 

4.2465 


2.3533 


7.9122 


10.5577 


2.8080 


3.-7417 


1.6360 


26.6556 


2.2541 




7.1995 
7.8485 
7.6687 
6.5063 
5.7488 
6.1724 
8.5208 


6.6995 
6.6672 
6.9777 
8.6949 
8.7826 
9.2785 
8.3759 


1.1361 
1.6132 
1.7208 
1.1071 
1.1031 
1.1108 
1.1831 


2.6165 
2.1300 
1.6454 
2.4340 
1.7989 
1.6957 
2.4471 


1.9099 
1.5604 
1.9881 
1.1165 
8710 
.8145 
1.2144 


19.5615 
19.8193 
20.0007 
19.8588 
18.3044 
19.0719 
21.7413 


6.5221 
3.9691 
5.5128 


1.5594 
1.2166 
1.1375 
1.6961 


7.0808 
7.0065 
8.0884 
6.3641 


2.3341 
1.5666 
2.3456 
2.2337 


2.5636 
2.0000 
1.8701 
2.7883 


5.1446 
5.6439 
4.8155 
7.4441 


6.3766 
6.3677 
5.7360 
t.4971 


5.2405 


12.8057 


.9033 


6.1410 


7.4430 


9.8263 
13.0507 


15.0014 
3.2650 


1.0443 
.6688 


6.6745 
3.6893 


3.7522 
2.1792 


36.2987 
22.8530 


tl2.9337 
7 0334 














1.7074 


4.6171 


1.1606 


4.3180 




8.2807 


6.2288 


.3859 


1.9351 


1.8390 


18.6695 


5.5450 


1.8827 
1.3588 


9.3786 
5.0737 


1.6737 


3 4594 
3.6421 




7.5457 
9.2989 


6.6851 
6.5145 


1.3097 
.9631 


2.5740 
1.8779 


.9569 
1.0577 


19.0714 
19.7121 


.43463 
3.2630 


1.2402 
Telepho 

.1591 
1.7194 

.6762 
1.6640 


7.3896 
ne Co.— 
9.7644 
10 9091 
4.8937 
6.9786 


.1968 

March 3 

.7281 

1.6545 

■4. '5446 


5.5233 
1, 1920— 
4.5511 
2.6316 
3.6628 
2.8555 


9.2730 


10.6233 


7. 7472 


2,6128 


2.6393 


1.6419 


25.2645 


5.1059 


5.5682 
2.6924 

■' 1.2608 


ii.4923 

7.9752 
7.9322 
7.0717 
15 6233 

19.7553 

5.7488 


5.5519 
8.1069 
5.2594 
4.7670 
13.5696 

15.0014 
3.2650 


2.3452 
.5088 
2.3897 
1.6834 
3.9906 

5.3829 
.3859 


1.4356 
3.0338 
1.2725 
3.8062 
1.5592 

6.6745 
1.2725 


4.4090 
1.5247 
1.7550 
1.2205 
2.4699 

4.4090 
.8145 


25.2340 
21.1494 

18.6088 
18.5488 
37.2126 

43.8836 
18.3044 


4.8753 
4.6158 
7.3185 
.6574 
4.6823 


5.2405 
.1591 


15.0847 
4.6171 


4.5446 
.1968 


8.6169 
1.8701 


9.2730 
1.2608 


7.3185 
.6574 



200 



Year "IBook 



IX. REVENUES AND 

For the 

CLASS "B." TELE 



Location 



Name of Utilitt 






Attica 

Brookville 

Butler 

W. Lebanon 

Delphi 

Churubusco 

Cambridge City. . 

Columbus 

Decatur 

Fairmount 

Warsaw. 

Connersville 

Danville 

Crown Point 

Greensburg 

Huntingburg 

North Manchester 

Corydon 

Columbia City. . . 

Flora 

Covington 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Greencastle 

Greenfield 

Angola 

Noblesville 

Portland 



Hope . . . 
Clinton . 
Fowler. . 



Knightstown. 
Lafontaine. . 
Lebanon .... 

Liberty 

Ligonier 

Madison .... 
Huntington. . 
Martinsville . 

Mitchell 

Monroeville. . 
Monticello. . . 
Nappanee . . . 

Linton 

Albion 

Lagrange 

Rising Sun . . 

Rockville 

Petersburg... 

Princeton 

Leesburg 

Carthage 

Rochester . . . 
Rushville 



Attica Telephone Co 

Brookville Telephone Co 

Butler Telephone Co 

Cadwallader Telephone Co 

Carroll Telephone Co 

Churubusco Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

Commerical Telephone Co. .'. 

Connersville Telephone Co 

Consolidated Telephone Co 

Crown Point Telephone Co 

Decatur County Independent Telephone Co 

Dubois County Telephone Co 

Eel River Telephone Co 

Eureka Telephone Co 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co 

Flora Telephone Co 

Fountain Telephone Co 

Franklin Telephone Co 

Garrett Telephone Co 

Greencastle Telephone Co 

Greenfield Telephone Co 

Steuben County Telephone Co 

Home Telephone Co 

Home Telephone Co 

Hoosier Telephone Co 

Hope Independent Telephone Co 

Indiana Telephone and Telegraph Co 

Indiana Union Telephone and Telegraph Co 

Jasper County Telephone Co 

Knightstown Telephone Co 

Lafontaine Telephone Co 

Lebanon Telephone Co ; 

Liberty Telephone Co 

Ligonier Telephone Co 

Madison Telephone Co 

Majencia Telephone Co 

Martinsville Telephone Co '. 

Mitchell Telephone Co 

Monroeville Home Telephone Co 

Monticello Telephone Co .'. 

Nappanee Telephone Co 

New Home Telephone Co 

Noble County Telephone Co 

Northern Indiana & Southern Mich.Telephone, Telegraph & Cable Co, 

Ohio River Telephone Co 

Parke County Telephone Co 

Pike County Telephone Co 

Princeton Telephone Co 

Public Service Telephone Co 

Ripley Farmers Co-operative Telephone Co 

Rochester Telephone Co ■ 

Rushville Co-operative Telephone Co 



632 

897 

676 

1,390 

790 

630 

1,883 

2,370 

2,100 

811 

1,618 

2,165 

1,471 

853 

2,400 

2,554 

No Data . . . 

No Data . . . 

1,900 

840 

555 

1,458 

999 

989 

950 

2,803 

1,228 

1,700 

2,128 

970 

1,628 

Purchased b 

983 

705 

750 

1,841 

900 



31.1531 
22.6554 
18.2126 
22.2403 
17.8679 
21.3102 
23.2981 
19.5085 
24.0368 
24.9021 
25.8623 
26.2554 
23.0636 
25.6357 
20.5368 
17.3976 



12.4553 
20.9123 
22.6121 
28.3072 
25.2^11 
21.8983 
26.6209 
19.7092 
24.6622 
24:1336 
13.0708 
17.6008 
28.9899 

y 

26.7815 
26.2660 
17.3935 
21.2125 
22.8073 
23.9514 



No Data . . . 
1,130 
997 
790 
630 
931 
723 



800 



12.2454 
26.4034 
24.9648 
18.8034 
28.6246 
23.2685 
36.5482 
18.1224 
19.0708 
19.8745 
17.2940 
27.1281 



No Data... 

830 

1,058 

1,309 

1,900 



16.5798 
15.3731 
26.4352 
20.3798 



tDeficit. 
♦Credit. 



Public Service Commission 



201 



EXPENSES— Continued 

Year 1920 

PHONE UTILITIES 



Operating Expenses per Station 




Classification I 


Classification II 


s. 

0) 


1 


1 


■1 


§ 
.2 


1 

i 


1§ 
1^ 





.2 



a g 
1.1 


i 


1 


■si 


1.8987 
2.4650 

■■■i;i876 

4.2994 
3.10 
3.2688 
1.3694 
1.23 
1.5868 
3.2931 
1.6628 
3.2787 
.2110 
1.6100 


12.7133 
5.1616 
8.3114 

12.0006 
7.2621 
5.90 
9.4787 
5.2573 
9.47 

10.9213 
6.3805 
9.8647 
6.3256 

16.0723 
8.2995 


1.0793 

"i.'9226 

2.0387 

1.4275 

1.13 

.7529 

"'2.'33" 

2.8744 

.4773 

5.0042 

"3'i848 
2.4079 


4.1115 

3.1438 

2.7663 

3.1614 

3.2366 

2.86 

3.4518 

2.5470 

3.58 

.1850 
2.9032 
3.3281 
5.3908 
3.9779 
3.3777 
2.3492 


.9509 
6.3243 
1.3650 
1.9182 
1.6546 
2.17 

.1925 

■■i;34' 
4.1760 
1.3255 
1.8234 

'".'6001 
2.1813 


8.2140 
8.6992 
6.9292 
10.1893 
7.5304 
6.2171 
6.7294 
4.4915 
7.4937 
8.5868 
6.2450 
10.8344 
10.5168 
8.3583 
8.9087 
6.8219 


8.0471 
4.3433 
4.3276 
6.3762 
5.2648 
4.5889 
6.3900 
5.8157 
7.0631 
7.6135 
5.9488 
7.6650 
7.5217 
13.0142 
4.4928 
4.8551 


2.3607 

".'8207 
.3088 
.8361 

"■;5652 

1.2424 

1.3997 

1.8764 

.1964 

.3564 

1.1607 

2.1592 

1.0104 

.0421 


2.8815 
3.9447 
2.4344 
4.2899 
4.3436 
4.5213 
4.0207 
2.8280 
2.0173 
2.2095 
5.1876 
2.9759 
6.0267 
.5154 
1.8608 
1.4575 


1.8413 

.8708 

.6515 

.8271 

1.3725 

1.3293 

1.1931 

2.1229 

1.6579 

2.0156 

1.5764 

.9345 

1.7904 

.9003 

1.1841 

.9664 


23.3446 
17.8580 
15.1634 
21.9913 
19.3474 
16.6566 
18.8984 
16.5005 
19.6317 
22.3018 
19.1542 
22.7662 
27.0163 
24.9474 
17.4568 
14.1430 


7.8085 

4.7974 

3.0492 

.2490 

tl.4795 
4.6536 
4.3997 
3.0080 
4.4051 
2.6003 
6.7081 
3.4892 

t3.9527 

.6883 

3.0800 

3 2546 


































.7366 
2.7357 


4.8901 
2.5857 


4.1016 

.2777 


"2. '2624 
3.5350 
6.8273 
4.0040 
1.3865 
3.4530 
3.38 
2.8284 
2.9588 
2.2556 
2.6421 
3.2341 
ompany 
3.81 


.6974 
1.4483 

' '^8773 
2.8249 

■■i,'6947 
3.34 
1.8553 

.9890 
1.1145 

.1410 

' Juiy,' i9 
1.60 


4.1013 
5.0355 
4.8204 
10.3906 
7.6564 
7.2481 
9.7766 
6.7317 
7.2334 
7.1810 
5.2403 
5.3276 
7.8212 
20—. . . . 


4.8901 
5.7620 
4.6760 
8.1791 
6.4973 
7.1524 
7.4224 
7.9091 
7.5089 
5.3089 
4.3840 
6.0161 
8.8402 


.0716 

.2679 

.6270 

.2640 

2.3355 

1.9152 

1.9562 

.6550 

2.5376 

.5353 

.7247 

1.4784 

3.5653 


1.3622 
4.7135 
3.5362 
4.3536 
1.1607 
4.2442 
2.2807 
3.5592 
2.9750 
3.8038 
1.8666 
2.0934 
1.6309 


.7545 
1.1110 
1.5586 
1.6119 
1.5716 
1.2984 

.9923 
1.2845 
2.1417 
1.4213 

.6523 

.9484 
1.6526 


li.i797 
16.8899 
15.2182 
24.7992 
19.2215 
21.8583 
22.4282 
20.1395 
22.3966 
18.2503 
12.8679 
15.8639 
23.5102 


1.2756 

. 4.0224 

7 3939 


3.5343 

.6281 
3.0333 

.9624 
2.11 
1.0411 
2.1765 

.6828 
1.4190 

.8763 


11.6936 
9.5155 

12.5346 

12.9712 
9.32 

11.3331 
9.0338 
6.9880 
9.2811 
7.9280 
Bell Tele 

12.62 


.2546 

.6775 

3.2723 

1.9587 

"2.0053 

1.3769 

1.1748 

.9995 

phone C 
3.77 


3.5080 
5.9996 

.0400 
4.1927 
t.4303 
2.2656 
5.8833 

.2029 
1.7369 
5.4797 


3.38 


10.2578 
7.6586 
6.3648 
5.5862 
9.4812 
7.0576 


8.7105 
6.1160 
7.4930 
5.0756 
4.6856 
5.8684 


.2175 
2.0670 
.2878 
.6333 
.1395 


5.6839 
5.1502 
2.4582 
3.5274 
4.4085 
5.5607 


1.0200 
1.2731 

.8794 
2.0903 

.6505 
1.1859 


25.8897 
22.2649 
17.4832 
16.9128 
19.3653 
19.6726 


.8918 
4 0011 












0897 


2.6508 
1.7000 
2.42 


4.4837 
9.0365 
5.83 


"i!7562 
1.61 


3.4468 
4.6636 
2.53 


'".'8966 
6.40 


4.2997 
3.4420 

4.2788 


6.2123 
2.8258 
1.26 
2.3809 


.6607 
4.0730 
10.20 
6.3039 


.6034 

■■4.'36" 
1.2722 


1.1494 
4.1387 
2.20 
4.1531 


2.9042 

".'256i 
.6917 


5.8988 
9.4727 
8.6261 
7.1322 

10.9806 
8.0121 
7.2177 
5.8793 
6.3184 
5.0358 
6.0428 

10.5153 


3.8324 
5.7943 
7.1897 
4.0585 
6.8205 
4.9818 
11.9102 
6.3222 
6.7865 
6.7826 
5.7453 
5.7386 


.1540 
1.5576 
1.9454 

.4869 
2.4839 
1.2212 
4.2372 

.1605 
1.3739 

"i.'9683 
1.4518 


1.6546 
5.0017 
3.8966 
3.1242 
3.1698 
3.8395 
1.4997 
1.5912 
2.3067 
3.2702 
.9914 
3.6894 


1.0953 
3.9259 
1.1392 
1.0826 
1.5973 
1.0922 
1.5504 
1.2662 
1.8454 
1.1682 
.9593 
1.1367 


12.6351 
25.7522 
22.7970 
15.8844 
25.0521 
19.1468 
26.4152 
15.2194 
18.6309 
16.2568 
15.6471 
22.5318 


.3897 

.6512 

2.1678 

2.9190 

3 5725 


2.90 
.6190 
.8353 

4.7067 

1.1051 
.3698 

1.4982 


.08 
9.9645 
7.0072 
5.0278 
8.042 
4.5947 
9.8119 


7.83 

" 1^3294 
.9507 

"2! 4925 


3.41 

4.0543 

3.6875 

4.1542 

2.7012 

3.1434 

4.9563 


"■;6875 
1.9290 
2.9954 

"i.'9846 


4.1217 
10.1330 
2.9030 
.4399 
3.6177 
1.6469 
4.5963 


2.16 






2.75 

2.8578 

3.5523 


"3. '0358 
1.8712 


6.0792 
5.9932 
6.6706 
10.6058 


3.1046 
4.3132 
5.2273 
3.2670 


.2218 

.2306 

1.7210 

.1465 


3.2270 
1.5106 
2.5203 
2.5037 


1.0106 

.8280 

1.6301 

1.3298 


13.6432 
12.8756 
17.7693 
17.8528 


2.9366 


.5350 
6.8983 


4.8049 
3.5600 


.7905 
.0280 


2.4975 
8.6659 
2 5270 















202 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND 

For the 

CLASS "B." TELE 



Location 



Name of Utility 



•9« 

(S o 



2 ^ 



Aurora 

iSullivan 

Tipton 

Union City . . . 

Goodland 

Columbia City 

Bremen 

Edinburg 

Albany 



Southern Indiana Telephone Co. 

Sullivan Telephone Co 

Tipton Telephone Co 

Union City Telephone Co 

Western Indiana Telephone Co. . 
Whitley County Telephone Co . . 
Bremen Home Telephone Co . . . 

Citizens Telephone Co 

The Co-operative Telephone Co. 



Maximum . 
Minimum . 



1,501 

1,060 

1,323 

1,977 

521 

2,084 

5G3 

616 

641 

2,803 
521 



26.8263 
42,4673 
20.4882 
19.2697 
23.6202 
15.4116 
20.8796 
23.7070 
21.3531 

42.4673 
12.2454 



Public Service Commission 



20? 



EXPENSES— Continued 
« 



Year 1920 
PHONE UTILITES 



Operating Expenses per Station 




Classification I 


Classification II 


! 






■3 


1 


1 


li 




1 


•si 






1 

•z 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




u 

m 
2 


a 
a 


li 


i 


^ 


fl 


S 


^ 


1^ 


Q 


S 


^ 


H 


6 


O 


H 


H 


•z 












7.8473 
10.5250 


7.4063 
8.9925 


1.6755 
2.9060 


3.4607 
4.0594 


1.1326 

4.5547 


21.5224 
31 0376 


5.3039 


3.6063 


16.9865 


2.7134 


5.9606 


.4512 


11.4297 


.9485 


9.0300 


1.0432 


2.6225 


.3189 


5.4385 


5.6233 


.1602 


2.8923 


1.2393 


15.3536 


5.1346 


1.55 


3.94 




2.92 




7.4515 


4.8156 


.4380 


2.0399 


.9393 


15.6843 


3 5854 


4.6065 


5.9648 


.1825 


3.6852 


2.3229 


7.0485 


6.6325 


1.4524 


1.4358 


1.2279 


17.7971 


5.8231 


1.0352 


6.8134 


.6093 


3.3603 


1.5581 


5.4941 


5.5852 


.9520 


1.3456 


.7589 


14.1358 


1.2758 


2.2646 


9.7704 


.6251 


3:3227 


.2488 


6.7619 


5.5651 


.3743 


3.0801 


.6394 


16.4208 


4.4588 


.8535 


4.5147 




3.1572 




9.8253 


5.4269 


1.4426 


3.1496 


1.6513 


21.4957 


2.2113 


.5417 


3.3721 




2.4396 




7.0170 


4.4121 


3.7666 


2.0004 


.8414 


18.0375 


3.3156 


6.8983 


16.9865 


7.83" 


6.8273 


6.40 


10.9806 


13.0142 


4.2372 


6.0267 


4.5547 


31.0376 


11.4297 


.2110 


.08 


.0280 


.1850 


.1410 


4.1013 


3.1046 


.0421 


.5154 


.6394 


11.1797 


.0400 



204 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES AND 
CLASS "A." WATER UTILITIES 



Location 



Name of Utilitt 



O m 



Ko 



Anderson 

Evansville . . . . 
Ft. Wayne. . . . 
Hammond . . . . 
Huntington . . . 

Lafayette 

Laporte 

Logansport. . . 

Marion 

Michigan City 
Mishawaka . . . 

Peru 

South Bend. . . 



East Chicago. 

Elkhart 

Elwood 

Gary 

Indianapolis. . 
Jeffersonville . 

Kokomo 

Muncie 

New Albany . 
Richmond. . . 
Terre Haute . 
Vincennes 



(a) municipally owned 

Anderson Water Works 

Evansville Water Works 

Fort Wayne Water Works 

Hammond Water Works 

Huntington Water Works 

Ijafayette Water Works 

Laporte Water Works 

Logansport Water Works 

Marion City Water Works 

Michigan City Water Co 

City Water and Light Co 

Peru Water Works 

City Water Works 



(b) privately owned 

East Chicago and Indiana Harbor Water Co. 

Elkhart Water Co 

Elwood Water Co 

Gary Heat, Light and Water Co 

Indianapolis Water Co 

Jeffersonville Water, Light and Power Co . . , 

Kokomo Water Works 

Muncie Water Works Co 

New Albany Water Works 

Richmond City Water Works 

Terre Haute Water Works Co 

Vincennes Water Supply Co 

Maximum 

Minimum 



962,197 
2,954,058 
2,246,706 
4,822,134 

494,353 
1,323,412 

760,576 
1,943,572 

820, "0?; 
2,697,315 

430,371 

361,609 
2,253,223 



4,196,140 
497,184 
226,592 

1,671,122 

11,037,225 

529,312 

667,222 

1,159,439 
799,063 

1,001,100 

1,925,680 
564,291 

11,037,225 

226,592 



.06204 
.07894 
. 10352 
.03117 
. 12372 



.02474 



.07553 
.03007 
.06259 
.01555 
. 10971 
, 12485 
. 10200 



.03753 
. 17799 
. 14533 
. 13400 
. 12642 
.08566 
. 14566 
. 10528 
. 13895 
. 12457 
. 13066 
. 13637 

. 17799 
.01555 



.01618 

.0038 

.0031 



.00215 
.00668 
.00505 
.01718 



.0005 

.013 

.2444 

.0179 

.0032 

.00586 

.0334 



.00749 

.006559 

.0131 

.0334 
.0005 



tDeficit. 



Public Service Commission 



205 



EXPENSES— Continued 

PER 1,000 GALLONS PUMPED 



Operating Expenses per 1,000 Gallons Pumped 




Classification 


Classification II 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 




11 

is. 

F 
1- 


1 


1 
1 


i 


1 
1 


to 

1 


a 
1 

s 


6 


1 


g 

1 


1 












.03540 
.03717 
.03009 
.01298 
.07256 
.05817 
.03733 


.00502 
.01008 
.00968 
.00134 
.00510 
.00380 
.00118 


« 

.00256 
.00205 
.00452 
.00027 
.00067 
.00184 
.00028 


.00798 
.00953 
.01178 
.00567 
.00712 
.00440 
.00598 


.00408 
.00609 
.00530 
.00178 
.00491 




.05504 
.06492 
.06137 
.02204 
.09036 
.06821 
.04989 
.02707 
.07312 
.01743 
.09255 
. 10473 
.05624 

.02589 
. 14358 
.10795 
.11482 
.06720 
.06484 
.08781 
.06491 
.09208 
.08270 
.09470 
.09971 

.14358 
.01743 


00700 


.02983 
.00277 
.00691 
.01327 
0175 


.00628 

.00424 

.00176 

.00260 

.0093 

.0034 

.0081 

.0081 

■; 66980 ■ 

.00121 
.0059 

.0010 


.01349 

.01974 

.00674 

.05157 

.0326 

.0237 

.0375 

.0375 

.00705 

.02822 

.06154 

.0089 

.0085 


.00291 
.00457 

".ooisi 

.0050 
.0024 
.0011 
0011 
.00357 
.00330 
.0078 
.0049 

.0016 

.051 

.0089 

.0106 

.0064 

.00114 

.0184 

.0094 

.0102 

.00722 

.01162 

.0133 

.051 
.0011 


.01402 
.04215 
.00913 
.03336 
02068 


.0120 
0262 


.00512 




.02564 
00300 


■ • 00464 


.06182 
.01349 
.05116 
.07220 
.02002 

.01305 
.06134 
.04726 
01797 
.02017 
.02848 
.02672 
.02612 
.05635 
.02337 
.02929 
.03976 

.07256 
.01298 


.00584 
.00128 
.00907 
.00676 
.01090 

.00185 
.00330 
.01509 
.01644 
.00425 
.00414 
.01403 
.00271 
.00500 
.00789 
.00585 
.00761 

.01644 
.00118 


.00104 
.00016 
.00116 
.00055 
."00279 

.00034 
.00163 
.00152 
.00330 
, 00062 
.00049 
.00670 
.00269 
.00487 
.00442 
.00460 
, 00682 

.00682 
.00016 


.00442 
.00250 
.01079 
.00937 
.01235 

.00276 
.02244 
.02338 
.02208 
.00994 
.01042 
.02697 
.01085 
.1035. 
.01395 
.01768 
.01664 

.02697 
.00250 






t. 01053 
.00188 
.01716 
.02012 
.04576 

.01164 
.03441 


.02634 
.01372 
.0098 

.0061 
.024 


.02037 
.01585 
.01018 

.00286 
.03017 
.00607 
.03603 
.00731 
.01154 
.00109 
.00316 
.00393 
.01802 
.00547 
.00697 

.03603 
.00109 


.00503 
.02470 
.01463 
.01900 
.02491 
.00977 
.01230 
.01938 
.01158 
.01505 
.03181 
.02191 

.03181 
.00503 


.0104 
.0156 
.0164 
.01253 

• • .di76' 

.0294 
.02020 
.02556 
.0253 

.02983 
.00277 


.0043 

.0048 

.0017 

.00187 

.0059 

.0028 

.0023 

.00209 

.003635 

.0045 

.0096 
.0010 


.0285 

.0093 

.0063 

.02157 

.0157 

.0128 

.0306 

.01158 

.009611 

.0142 

.06154 
.0063 


.03738 
.01918 
.05922 
.02082 
.05785 
.04037 
.04687 
.04187 
.03596 
.03666 

.05922 
.00300 



206 



Year Book 



IX. REVENUES ANI> 

For the 

■ CLASS "B." WA 



Location 



Name of Utiutt 



L 

Qj 00 

|i 

S s 

03 O 

0:2 



«(5 

p 

Oo 

is 



(a) MtTNIClPALLT OWNED 



Alexandria — 

Attica 

Auburn 

Bedford 

Bloomington . . 

Bluffton 

Boonville 

Brazil 

Clinton 

Columbia City 
Columbus. . . . 
Conneraville. . . 

Dunkirk 

Garrett 

Goshen 

Greenfield .... 
Hartford City. 
Kendallville. . . 

Lebanon 

Madison 

Martinsville. . . 

Mitchell 

New Castle . . . 

Portland 

Rochester 

Tell City 

Tipton 

Union City . . . 
Whiting 



Aurora 

Bicknell 

Crawfordsville. 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Greencastle . . . 
Greensburg. . . 
Jasonville. . . . 
Lawrenceburg. 

Linton 

Mt. Vernon. . . 
Noblesville. . . . 

Princeton 

Seymour 

Shelbyville. . . . 

Sullivan 

Valparaiso 

Wabash 

Warsaw 

Washington. . . 
W. Lafayette. 
Winchester. . . . 



Alexandria Water Works 

City Light and Water Plant 

Auburn Water and Electric Works 

Bedford Water Works 

City Water Works 

Bluffton Municipal Water Works 

Boonville Water Works 

Brazil City Water Works 

Clinton Water Works 

Columbia City Water Works 

Municipal Water Plant 

City Water Works. 

Dunkirk Water Works 

Water Works Department 

City Electric Light and Water Works. 

Greenfield Water Works 

Hartford City Water Works 

Water Works Department 

Lebanon Water Works 

Madison Water Works 

Martinsville Water Supply 

Mitchell Water Works 

New Castle Water and Light Plant. . . 

Municipal Water Works 

Rochester City Water Works 

Tell City Water Works 

Tipton Water Works 

Union City Water Works 

City of Whiting Water Works ....... 



(b) PRIVATELY OWNED 



Indiana Public Service Co 

Bicknell Water Works 

Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Co. . 

Frankfort Water Works 

Franklin Water Light and Power Co . . . 

Greencastle Water Works 

Greensburg Water Co 

Wabash Valley Electric Co 

Lawrenceburg Water Co 

Linton Water Co 

Mt. Vernon Water Works 

Noblesville Water and Light Co 

Princeton Water and Light Co 

Seymour Water Co 

Interstate Public Service Co 

Sullivan County Water Co 

Valparaiso Home Water Co 

Wabash Water and Light Co 

Winona Electric Light and Water Co . . . 
Washington Water Light and Power Co. 

West Lafayette Water Works. 

Citizens Heat Light and Power Co 



Maximum. 
Minimum . 



280,590 
261,713 
590,898 



.04101 
.06957 
.05375 



100,000 
70,000 
189,858 
306,141 
130,835 
751,901 
632,377 
34,000 
138,609 



. 19544 
. 14713 
. 11034 
.08909 
.07819 
.06240 
.04767 
.20410 
.09052 



154,609 
376; 445 



.21230 
; 03836 



426,905 
140,828 
200,000 
85,500 
347,819 
164,980 
1,708,250 



146,772 
160,000 
303,186 
345,587 
149,609 
222,504 
133,720 



, 10184 
. 12336 
.06165 
.11455 
.03632 
.09047 
.01492 



.11854 
. 15270 
. 14750 
. 13338 
, 10916 
. 16787 
.26807 



190.000 
218,330 
189,268 
459,926 
315,000 
345,962 
50,000 
301,839 
617,463 
863,500 
464,924 
315,775 
124,000 

1,708,250 
34,000 



. 14352 
. 13624 
.09179 
.09390 
13193 
.08502 
. 45947 
. 12586 
.07617 
.03605 
.09752 
.08035 
.11530 

.45947 
.01492 



tDeficit. *Credit. 



Public Servjce CoMMissroN 



207 



EXPENSES— Continued 

Year 1920 

TER UTILITIES 



Operating Expenses per 1,000 Gallons Pumped 




Classification I 


Classification II 


Depreciation 
and Taxes 




h 


1 




1 


1 

i 
.1 


a 
'S, 

a 


J 

i 
i 


o 


1 


a 
o 

.2 

1 
Q 




e2 


5? 


























.01016 


.00133 
.00411 
.00493 


.01863 
.03588 
.01939 


.00369 
.00048 
.01024 


.02337 
.05445 
.04055 


.00716 
■■.00493 


.00053 
.00018 
.00161 


.00276 
.00150 
.00248 






.03382 
.05946 
.04957 


00719 


.01448 
.01052 


.00333 




.01011 
00418 










.03244 


.00651 
.06638 
.00928 
.00210 
.00086 
.00223 
.00041 
.04006 
.01012 


.09803 
.05142 
.05052 
.01690 
.00152 
.01939 
.03672 
.07421 
.04662 


.02752 

".00287 
.00483 
.00108 
.00428 
.01046 
.01664 
.00408 


. 13469 
.05144 
.08478 
.03980 
.05453 
.03941 
.06014 
.13113 
.06850 


.02420 
.06638 
.00873 
.00577 
.00239 
.00257 
.00373 
.03987 
.00618 


.00215 
.00033 
.00026 
.00012 
.00029 
.00284 
.00222 


.01570 
.00857 
.00616 
.00894 
.00429 
.00146 
.00310 
.01024 
.00780 


.02715 




20174 
. 12639 
.11007 
.06170 
.06147 
.04356 
.07052 
. 19586 
.08470 


t. 00630 
02074 


'omi 


.00825 
.00686 




.00027 
.02739 
01672 


.00627 






01884 


.01806 


.00326 
.01178 




t. 02285 
00824 




O058'> 


- 

















































































.04175 


.61384 


.07488 


.00830 


.11557 


.01774 


.00120 


.02184 






.15635 


05595 










.00802 


.00199 


.00992 


.00059 


.01972 


.00078 




.00004 






.02054 


01782 












.0018 


.0459 


.0018 


.05985 
.02556 
.01918 
.08403 
.02366 
.04871 
.00400 

.06827 
.05448 
.05423 
.05283 
.05729 
.06871 
.10031 


.00333 
.01543 
.00934 
.00217 
.00632 
.00636 
.00058 

.01149 

.00570 

.01041 

.01454 

.00652 

.0120 

.01790 


.00063 

'■;o6677 

.00030 
.00226 

.00212 
.00416 

01093 
.00158 
.00448 
.01144 

00114 


.01066 
.00008 
.00530 
.00027 
.00289 
.00933 
.00156 

.01017 
.01491 
.00717 
.02177 
.01145 
.02309 
.02598 


.00710 




.08157 
.0H07 
.03750 
.09285 
.03589 
.07030 
.00614 

. 10079 
.08503 
.09949 
.11994 
.08332 
. 13983 
. 19745 


02027 




08229 


.00330 

.0124 

.00077 

.01835 

.00136 


.00069 

.0063 

.00140 

.00515 

.00056 

"Mm 

.00440 
.00746 

".'6ii26 

.01429 


.01800 

.0638 

.02242 

.02624 

.00011 

.02676 
.02620 
.02852 
.03815 
.03470 
.03951 
.06162 


.00805 

.0039 

.00094 

.00199 

.00301 

.03441 
.01219 
.01891 
.00392 
.01276 
.01481 
.01550 


.00368 
.00561 
.00272 
.00364 




.02415 
.02170 
.00043 
.02017 
00878 


,02408 
.02460 
.00567 
.02639 
.02407 
.02996 
.03556 


.00216 
.00531 

■■.■60926 

*. 00303 

.00776 

.01280 


.00658 
.00047 
.01675 
,02002 
.00661 
.01674 
.03932 


.01775 
.06767 
.04801 
.01344 
.02584 
.02804 
.07062 


























r-.- 1 


.OU^G. 
.01692 


.00377 
.00529 
.90180 
.00581 
.01068 

!6645' 
.00214 


.03423 

.03657 

.03481 

.01316 

.01277 

.0213 

.0698 

.0190 

.01807 


.00752 

.02531 

.00619 

.00325 

.00722 

.0031 

.0815 

.0138 

.00192 


.05864 
.06798 
.04606 
.02910 
.02997 
.03143 
. 13918 
.05174 
.02564 
.02068 
.05635 
.03706 
.02798 

. 13918 
.00400 


.00400 
.00381 
00566 
.00518 
.00552 
.00478 
.03211 
.00696 
.00647 
.00275 
.00389 
.00139 
.01065 

.06638 
.00058 


'■; 00371 
.00038 
.00381 
.00040 
.00284 
.00039 
.00090 
.00110 
.00038 
.00185 
.00342 
.00212 

.01144 
.00012 


.01855 
.02074 
.01321 
.01317 
.03341 
.00784 
.15587 
.01937 
.01045 
00653 
.01057 
.02088 
.01125 

. 15587 
.00004 


.00862 
.00489 

"■;66411 
.00508 
.00457 
.06557 
.01199 


.00799 
.02364 
.01188 
.01012 
.00884 
.00943 
.04811 
.00252 


.09780 
.12477 
.07719 
.06549 
.08322 
.05175 
.44123 
.09348 
.04366 
.03353 
.09049 
.07205 
.08157 

.44123 
.00614 


, 04572 
.01147 
.01460 
.02841 
.04871 


.0128 
.1155 
.0073 
01474 


.03327 
.01824 
.03238 
.03251 




.66ii6 

.00529 
.00027 
.02016 

.06557 
.00027 


.00209 
.01254 
.00903 
.00941 

.04811 
.00047 


.00252 


.01559 
.01774 
.0172 

.1155 
.00077 


.00902 
.00137 
.0020 

.06638 
.00041 


.03508 

'.om 

.09803 
.00011 


.00816 
.00640 
.0084 

.0815 
.00048 


.00703 
.00830 
.03373 

.08229 
.00027 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



HON. WARREN T. McCRAY, 
Governor. 

Sir: 

The Conservation Commission submits, with its approval, the accom- 
panying report of the Director and of the Division Chiefs. It calls 
especial attention to the scope and practical character of the work under- 
taken by the department. 

Attention is respectfully directed to the financial statements sub- 
mitted as evidence of the high value of the work of the department to 
the State. 

That the Commission is able to submit such a satisfactory report, 
is largely due to the initiative and indomitable energy of Director 
Richard Lieber. 

Respectfully, 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION. 



CONSERVATION . COMMISSION 

W. A. GUTHRIE, Chairman. 
E. M. WILSON, Secretary. 
STANLEY COULTER. 
JOHN W. HOLTZMAN. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICE 

RICHARD LIEBER, Director. 

CHARLES GOODWIN SAUERS, Assistant to Director. ' 

E. W. GALLAGHER, Accountant. 

HELEN M. ROREX, Clerk and Stenographer. 

SUE G. SCOTT, File Clerk. 

KATHLEEN HOGAN, Telephone Operator and Clerk. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR TO THE COMMISSION 

The Department of Conservation was created by the 71st session 
of the Indiana General Assembly, and is known as Chapter 60 of the 
Acts of 1919. It was amended by the 72nd session of the Indiana 
General Assembly by the addition of a sixth division. This act is 
known as Chapter 238, Section 2 of the Acts of 1921 and had for its 
purpose the creation of a division of engineering. 

The following table exhibits in graphic form the organization of 
the department. 



Department *op Conservation 



209 




14—19930 



210 Year Book 

The division chiefs make a brief halt upon the completion of the 
fiscal year to report upon their activities. It is my pleasant duty to 
summarize as well as to submit these interesting records herewith. They 
speak an eloquent language of intelligent service and devotion to the 
great cause of Conservation in Indiana. 

If there still be left any who consider conservation a highly theo- 
retical, nonutilitarian and expensive plaything, let them read these re- 
ports \7herein is shown how the department assembles scientific parts 
into vehicles of practical everyday service. How it makes use of the 
research work of our universities and the knowledge of our men of 
learning. How it applies this learning for the benefit of our state and 
its people. How it interchanges its own experiences and finally how 
all of this work if expressed in taxes (in reality it is paid out of the 
state's earnings) would have cost each person in the state the sum of 
two cents, or the price of a postage stamp. 

This truly modest amount has helped to disclose new sources of 
oil and gas, it has enabled the coal operator better to appraise coal 
measures, it has given us a greater honey production in the state, has 
protected the farmer and his crops. It has opened new state parks as 
recreational and social centers, provided tourists and vacationists with 
cheery quarters, built bridges and trails, issued helpful publications on 
such subjects as Trees of Indiana, Points of Interest, Mineral Deposits, 
Natural Resources, Lakes, and many other subjects. It has protected 
lake levels and commenced to purify our streams. It has returned dollars 
for cents received and besides material returns of no mean proportions 
has through the undivided support of the press and the people elevated 
the department into an agency of social advancement and a torch-bearer 
of justified state pride. 

Such is the result of the work of the division chiefs with whom 
it is my privilege to collaborate, -and to whose astute, conscientious and 
high-minded labors the results in evidence are due. 

A summary of the year's work by divisions would appear as follows : 

GEOLOGY 

Technical and scientific reports and articles on cement materials, 
building stones, distribution of oil and gas, kaolin, oil shales, oil fields, 
and a study of the Clay City Quadrangle were published in trade jour- 
nals, scientific and popular publications. 

Archaeological investigations were carried on in connection with the 
geology field work. A number of archaic deposits were located. 

The use of oil shales was investigated. 

1. As to the number of gallons of oil per tone of shale. 

2. Testing of different methods of extraction. 

3. Possible method of utilizing the spent shale. 

4. Discovery of possible valuable by-products. 
Data on New Albany oil shade established. 

Systematic field work was conducted in the northern part of the 
coal measure area of the state. As a result a number of problems con- 
nected with the distribution and identification of the coal beds were 
solved. 



I 



Department of Conservation 211 

Experts of the field force together with a representative of the U. 
S. Geological Survey succeeded in establishing a correct correlation of 
the subdivisions of the Chester Division, collected data in the south- 
western oil field, showed elevation of mouth of well above sea level, 
recorded locations and secured logs and data on production. 

A total of 589 reports were made to citizens on rock and mineral 
substances. 

For two years the division has been working on a much needed 
compendium of the geology of Indiana. This interesting work will ^o 
to press in 1922. It is divided into a number of parts, viz., Geography, 
Topography and Glaciology, Stratigraphy, Paleo-Geography and Paleont- 
ology, Hydrology, Economic Geology and Oil-bearing Shales. The work 
carries a full list of illustrations, maps and charts. 

In the field and laboratory data and samples were collected on the 
mineral resources of the state. Such samples are, f. i., road materials, 
clays and shales, abrasives, building stones, foundry and glass sands 
and cement materials. 

Four hundred and twenty-four abandoned gas wells in twenty- 
nine counties were sealed — eighteen more than in the previous year. 
The object being the prevention of salt water, etc., from the low strata, 
to mix with fresh water strata near the surface or into nearby oil or 
gas domes. 

The collection of logs of newly drilled wells enables the geologist 
to determine accurately the substrata of the state. 

The State Museum notwithstanding its neglected condition, has 
become more popular than ever. Forty-three thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-eight visitors registered, an increase of 32,590 over the previous 
year. Estimating the non-registering visitors as of 20 per cent it would 
show one visitor for every three minutes the Museum was opened. 

Forty-one donations and collections were added, among them the 
Paxton collection of more than 1,500 pieces, which, owing to lack of 
exhibition space, remains unpacked. 

Dr. W. N. Logan, State Geologist, contributes a valuable paper on 
the appearance of "Gold in Indiana." Prof. John R. Reeves one on 
"Potash in the New Providence Shale of Indiana" and on "An Intra- 
formational Breccia of the St. Louis Limestone of Indiana." 

entomology 

One hundred and ninety-six nurseries were given certificates of 
inspection. 

Acreage which the nurserymen have planted was listed. 

Intercepted shipments containing brown-tail moth nests. Informed 
Federal Horticultural Board which issued drastic orders in consequence. 

Seventy-six greenhouses visited and inspected and control measures 
against different insects and diseases were adopted. 

Defensive measures for the control of the Chinch Bug were pro- 
mulgated. 

The successful quarantine placed upon some farms in Porter, La- 
porte and Tippecanoe counties was modified and approval of action 
received from Federal Horticultural Board. 



212 Year Book 

Protection in a most practical way and saving of a considerable 
sum of money to the Indiana farmer through the department's use of 
police power. 

Successful determination of the European corn borer situation with 
respect to a threatened federal quarantine. 

Attention given to appearance of corn ear worm. 

Assistance rendered to citizens regarding household insects. 

Large results obtained in Bee work. 

Cleaning up on American and European Foul Brood. 

Brood diseases of bees in four years have declined from 14.9 per 
cent in 1918 to 4.6 per cent in 1921. 

Two thousand two hundred and fifty yards were visited. 

Twenty thousand four hundred and twenty-six of colonies inspected. 

One thousand fifty diseased with foul brood. 

Fifty-four counties visited. 

Estimated total production of 6,000,000 pounds of honey shown for 
state, or an estimated increase of 1,000,000 pounds over 1920. 

FORESTRY 

Results obtained in the Division of Forestry cannot be measured 
in dollars and cents, for no logs or ties were cut and sold. Yet, the 
work done was of great economic importance to our people. For years 
the exertions of a few far-sighted men were nothing but a voice in 
the wilderness. Today their efforts have become the cornerstone of a 
projected state and national structure of forest preservation. 

The division has carried the slogan "Let your idle acres work." It 
has called attention to the dangerous depletion of timber and, having 
developed a tentative plan for forest reconstruction, has obtained from 
the legislature a fund to make a practical start. 

A huge waste of our patrimony in hardwood forests has been com- 
mitted. If the estoppel of such waste means anything, if the awaken- 
ing of public opinion is of value, then the division has succeeded beyond 
its immediate expectations. There exists today a widespread realiza- 
tion of our great need and it must be left to wise legislation to support 
the forestry policy of the department. But reforms of this magnitude 
cannot be expected overnight. Let us only hope that they will come 
about in time. 

In the meantime the Clark County Forest continues to be an object 
lesson to the farmer and timber man. It is the largest hardwood ex- 
periment station in the country and as the years go on will increase in 
importance as a source of practical information on tree growth. 

Careful measurements are taken and records kept. In certain tracts 
the trees are calipered every ten years, furnishing exact data of grow- 
ing conditions. 

Ten thousand white pine, one year old, were planted. At the end 
of the season 9,074 were alive. 

Public interest in the Clark County Forest is increasing. A guide 
pamphlet has been published and many tourists and picnic parties have 
been seen to take a lively interest in forestry problems; a matter which 
heretofore never had engaged their attention. 



Department op Conservation 2X3 

One thousand five hundred and fifty-one visitors from twenty-one 
states and Canada, a small portion of the total, had registered during 
the year. 

A reconnaissance of available timberland was made. 

An outstanding achievement of the division was the publication of 
Beam's "Trees of Indiana." The work was printed in a manner be- 
fitting the importance and quality of the opus. It alone would have 
fully justified the existence of the division not counting the larger values 
touched upon above. 

LANDS AND WATERS 

Our state parks have become a direct asset to the state. 

They are self-supporting. They are a mecca of the family of small 
means and high thoughts, truly the majority in our state. 

The campaign against stream pollution has so far resulted in tri- 
partite good. (1) Restoration of stream itself with all attendant good. 
(2) Savings of factory products and by-products. (3) Protection of 
public health. 

The work of safeguarding lake levels has promoted the interest 
in our aquatic play and sport grounds and has definitely protected and 
enhanced the property values along the shores. 

Connected with this work the division's interest in drainage matters 
is slowly bringing order out of the existing chaos by substituting tech- 
nically and scientifically correct principles for rule of the thumb methods. 

The division is fast becoming the clearing house for the tourist 
business as it was the first to point to the great pecuniary value of this 
new industry to the people of the state. 

Turkey Run returned nearly 8 per cent on an investment of about 
$109,000. 

The paid admissions were 54,107 for the year. This is admission 
purely — not daily attendance. 

The hotel and cottages with room for seventy guests were constantly 
filled, so w?re the lesser accommodations in tents. From four to five 
times as many guests wishing to make reservation were quartered in 
nearby farn. bouses or had to be turned away. 

A heatir.g plant was installed, making possible all year hotel service. 

Service quarters were extended and cottages and grounds lighted 
by electricity. 

One hundred and eighty-one acres — the front yard of the park — 
lying south and east of the old reservation, were added. 

Important engineering work was done which will be referred to in 
its proper place. 

Sunset Foint in danger of being washed away was rebuilt and held 
by means of a concrete retaining wall. 

The descent to the swinging bridge from the cliff was almost im- 
possible; a flight of concrete steps was provided. 

Cistern and dry well were built. 

At McCormick's Creek a delightful change was made by rebuilding 
the old sanitarium into thirteen sleeping and one bath room. 

Electric lights and power were installed. 



214 Year Book 

Plumbing added to kitchen and bath room. 

Fibre reed furniture made at the prison was installed. 

A new deep well for drinking water was sunk. 

Park drive was gravelled. 

At Clifty Falls State Park preliminary work was done as reported 
by the Engineering Division. 

Historic Lafayette Spring in Perry county has been presented to 
the state. 

"Points of Interest," a pamphlet showing ninety-two spots of scenic 
and historic value, was published. 

FISH, AND GAME 

The division is entirely self-supporting. Receipts for the year 
amounted to $132,852.35^. 

Approximately $10,000 were paid into the Public School Fund 
through the activities of the Game Wardens. 

A checking system of motor car service has reduced cost of opera- 
tion to a minimum. 

An increase of 8,756 licenses is shown over record year of 1920. 

One thousand four hundred and eighty-seven arrests were made dur- 
ing the year, an average of 55.4 cases per warden or about 60 per cent 
more than the next highest states in the Union, Connecticut and New 
York. 

Ninety- three per cent of all arrests resulted in convictions. 

On the basis of a force as great or greater than ours, results in 
Game Warden Service are four and one-half times bigger than under 
former system of political appointment. 

Ten million nine hundred and thirty-six thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-seven fish were reared and planted last year. 

A State Fair exhibit was held which proved immensely popular. 

Motion pictures were made showing fish propagation, lake country 
and game warden work. 

Sixteen fish, game and bird protective associations were formed, 
bringing up the total to 124 associations. This is perhaps the largest 
number in any state of the Union. 

Twenty-one thousand one hundred and thirty-eight pieces of mail 
were handled, an indication of the amount of work in hand, out of a 
total of 65,845 for the whole department. Ninety-six colored slides and 
lectures on birds of Indiana were prepared. 

Liberated quail and pheasants in State Park. 

One hundred and forty thousand square feet of seines and nets were 
seized and destroyed. 

Two hundred and ninety-eight pieces of illegally taken fur were 
confiscated. 

Thirty cases were made against owners of fish traps, besides several 
hundred traps picked up and destroyed. 

In excess of 100,000 game fish rescued from stagnant or receding 
waters. 



Department of Conservation 215 

engineering 

The following summary is for a period of .<ix mo ';; tor the 
division proper and for two months foi the subdivision ci '^anitary 
Engineering. 

Drainage survey of state begun. 

Pollution of St. Marys River below Decatur stopped. 

As a result of waste elimination a large beet sugar company re- 
covers from five to ten tons of sugar per day during three months' 
operation. 

Twenty-two cases of stream pollution were investigated and were 
followed up. 

Complete topographic maps of Turkey Run and Clifty Falls State 
Parks and environs were made. 

Bench marks between Bloomington and Columbus were re-estab- 
lished. 

Plans and estimates for new trestle and park road at Turkey Run 
were made and construction of trestle begun, Superintendent Luke direct- 
ing work. 

information 

The department enjoys the confidence and aid of the press. Without 
attempting to appraise the material value of this support its inestimable 
worth is duly and gratefully acknowledged by all of us. 

CONCLUSION 

The above summary speaks of work undertaken and completed. Not 
contained therein is a wealth of effort in the approach and the survey 
of given situations. Neither is mention made of action preventative . " 
waste or destruction. 

In this place I should only mention that the interior organization 
of the department, thanks to the willingness and capacity of those con- 
cerned, has reached a gratifying point of reliability. 

We have seen of late that the function of Federal and State Gov- 
ernment was enlarged and that with this public demand for more de- 
tailed service came an avalanche of new bureaus, commissions and offices. 
Many unquestionably much needed and entirely serviceable, but on the 
other hand, there grew up a not inconsiderable number of sinecures and 
well nigh worthless appendages. Above all there has come about a top- 
heaviness in administration affairs where mere additions instead of sub- 
junctions were made. The organization of the Department of Conserva- 
tion is an indicator how this topheaviness may be lightened by placing 
all branches of a given general subject under one executive. In this 
manner greater results can be obtained. 

The Department of Conservation as the declared foe of waste in 
any form and the champion of greater use of all resources is quite 
willing that a test — ex parte as it were — of its usefulness be made, 
comparing the amount of the appropriation spent with the amount of 
material benefit produced. Such an appraisal of course would not even 
touch the most important phase of the department's work, viz., the 
study, classification and grouping of our natural resources as some 
of the foremost instrumentalities for maintaining public security and 
national defense. 

RICHARD LIEBER. 



216 



Year Book 



POSTAGE REPORT 
1920—1921 



DIVISION 


Received 


Mailed 


1st class 


All 
Other 


Ist class 


2nd class 


General Administration and Lands and Waters 


4,971 
4,351 
3,049 

881 
7,341 

203 


324 
1,057 
370 
265 
365 
25 


3,524 
4,517 
2,857 
1,503 
11,539 
501 


9,977 
2 427 


Geology 


605 




3,297 


Fish and Game » . 


1 893 




3 








20,796 


2,406 


24,441 


18,202 



Total number of pieces of mail handled 65,845 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF GEOLOGY 



W. N. LOGAN, State Geologist. 

ORGANIZATION 

The working organization of the division as it is now organized 
consists of a technical force, office force, fields corps and gas inspection 
force. 

TECHNICAL FORCE 

W. N. LOGAN, Ph. D., Economic Geology. 

E. R. CUMINGS, Ph. D., Stratigraphy and Paleontology. 

C. A. MALOTT, Ph. D., Topography and Glaciology. 

S. S. VISHER, Ph. D., Geography. 

W. M. TUCKER, Ph. D., Hydrology. 

J. R. REEVES, A. B., Assistant and Draftsman. 

H. W. LEGGE, Preparator. 

OFFICE FORCE 

THEODORE KINGSBURY, Supervisor of Natural Gas. 
EDWARD H. SHAW, Curator of Museum. 
MRS. ADDA RINKER, Clerk and Stenographer. 



FIELD CORPS FOR 1921 



W. N. Logan 
E. R. Cumings 
C. A. Malott 
J. R. Reeves 
R. E. Egarey 
G. G. Bartle 



M. A. Harrell 
H. C. Barnett 
E. L. Lucas 
J. I. Moore 
W. P. Rawles 
K. W. Ray 



P. B. Moore 



Department op Conservation 217 

NATURAL GAS INSPECTION FORCE 



THEODORE KINGSBURY, Supervisor. 

deputies 

C. N. Brown Geneva 

John Ersinger * Sullivan 

J. P. Horton Montpelier 

J. E. Mclntyre Marion 

Herschell Ringo Muncie 

Geo. H. Smith ; Owensville 

John Watson Petersburg 

Howard Legge .....} Bloomington 

0. H. Hughes Sharpsville 

E. E. Wherry Shoals 

publications 

Reports and articles wefe prepared and published during the year 
as follows: 

"Report of the Division of Geology," Indiana Year Book, 1921. This 
report contains an account of the work and finances of the division and 
technical papers as follows: "The Building Stones of Indiana" and 
"Cement Materials and Industries." 

A map showing the distribution of oil and gas in Indiana was 
prepared and published in "The Petroleum Register," New York. 

An article entitled "In Case of a Petroleum Shortage" was pub- 
lished by the Oil News. "The Division of Geology" was published in 
Indiana Academy of Science. Many extracts of reports were published 
in the newspapers of Indiana. Reviews and notices of the Kaolin and 
the Petroleum reports were published in Science, Economic Geology, 
Journal of Geology, University Quarterly, Oil News, Petroleum, Maga- 
zine of the New York Petroleum Exchange and other periodicals. "The 
Oatsville Oil Field," Oil News. "Oil Shales of Indiana," Engineering 
and Mining Journal, Oil Shale Review, and Street. Chapters on geology 
were prepared for "A Survey of Indiana's Natural Resources" published 
by the Department of Conservation. Articles prepared, or partly pre- 
pared, for publication include : Handbook of Indiana Geology, The Geology 
of the Clay City Quadrangle, the Oil Fields of Pike, Gibson and Sulli- 
van counties, the Gas Structures of Tipton and Howard counties, the 
Coal Field of Indiana. 

archaeological investigations 

Field investigations in archaeology were undertaken during the year 
in connection with the geologic investigations. A number of new archaic 
deposits were located. Besides the work done by the regular field party 
the following were engaged for brief periods in such investigations: W. 
N. Logan, J. R. Reeves, Dick Guernsey and T. C. Heistand. 



218 Year Book 

One of the most valuable discoveries was that of the skeleton of a 
human being exhumed by Mr. Dick Guernsey, assisted by T. C. Hei- 
stand. The skeleton was taken from a prehistoric mound near the 
east fork of White River, in Guthrie Township, Lawrence county. The 
mound had been laid out in the form of a square and a vault system, 
constructed of slabs of limestone brought from the river bluffs some 
distance away, occupied the lower part. The upper part consisted of 
loose sand in which bodies had been buried promiscuously. The skeleton 
was obtained from the lower level and was lying as buried with all 
parts intact and in position with the exception of some of the more 
fragile parts. The skeleton is that of a man about six feet high and 
somewhat past middle age at the time of his death. As far as could 
be ascertained from the remains, death occurred from natural causes. 
The fragment of an arrow point was found between the cervical verte- 
brae and a small bone, that of a bird, apparently, in the roof of the 
mouth. Another arrow point and a bone awl made from the antler 
of a deer were found near the body. 

The teeth of the lower jaw are in good condition with the excep- 
tion of the right anterior pre-molar which shows evidence of decay. 
There had been some absorption of the tissue of the lower jaw at the 
base of the teeth, due evidently to pyorrhea. The upper jaw on the 
right side has three good molars, the pre-molars are badly worn and 
one bicuspid is lacking. On the left side of the upper jaw the canine, 
bicuspids, the anterior pre-molar and the posterior molar are gone. 

The skull measurements are as follows: The anterior-posterior 
circumference of the skull is 24% inches; the lateral cheek circumfer- 
ence is 21^/4 inches; the distance from coronoid process to coronoid pro- 
cess is 4 1^6 inches; the distance from the exterior of right condyle 
to the exterior of left condyle is 5% inches; the submaxillary circum- 
ference is 8^^ inches; the distance from the point of the submaxillary 
to the base of the frontal bone (anterior) is 5 inches; the lateral cir- 
cumference is 1% inches; the distance from the nasal spine to the 
posterior side of the foramen magnum is 3 inches; the distance from 
mastoid to mastoid across the foramen magnum is 4^/4 inches; the diam- 
eter through the zygomatic processes of the temporal bones is 5V2 inches; 
the anterior-posterior diameter of the foramen magnum is 1t% inches 
and the lateral diameter is 1t% inches. 

The skeleton was brought to Indianapolis and now rests in a case 
in the museum. Other explorations led to the discovery of several 
artifacts. 

OIL SHALE INVESTIGATIONS 

Investigations of the oil bearing shales of Indiana were carried 
on throughout the year in the field and in the laboratory. The investiga- 
tions embraced: 

1. The determination of the number of gallons of oil per ton of 
the various oil bearing shales. 

2. The testing of different methods of extraction. 

3. Possible methods of utilizing the spent shale. 

4. The discovery of possible valuable by-products. 



Department ^f Conservation 219 

Three methods of extraction were employed, the dry process, the 
wet process and the heavy oil digestion process. The apparatus and 
machinery necessary for testing the last named process was furnished 
through the kindness of Mr. Louis Clarke of Ardmore, Pa., at an ex- 
pense to him of about one thousand dollars. 

Experiments conducted in our laboratory in extraction by using the 
heavy oil digestion process were unsatisfactory in the results obtained 
and led to the abandonment of the process. The unsatisfactory results 
obtained also led to the temporary abandonment of the commercial plant, 
ground for which had been broken in southern Indiana. As a result 
of these preliminary investigations in the laboratory many thousands 
of dollars were saved the investors. 

Our efforts for the present are being concentrated on the dry dis- 
tillation process. The method used will be the same as that used by 
the United States Bureau of Mines. In fact the future work on the oil 
shales of Indiana will be done in co-operation and under the advisory 
supervision of the Bureau of Mines. By the use of this method com- 
parison can easily be made between the results obtained in Indiana and 
those obtained from oil shales in other states. 

The following is a brief summary of the results obtained by our 
investigations thus far: 

data on the new ALBANY OIL SHALE 

Name — -The New Albany Shale. 

Age — Devonian and Mississippian. 

Distribution — Southeastern Indiana in Jennings, Jackson, Clark, Jefferson, Scott, 
and Floyd Counties. Also White and Carroll. 

Thickness — From 20 to 100 feet in the area of the outcrop. Total thickness about 
140 feet. 

Areal outcrop — 500 square miles. 

Transportation — Three main railways thru the district. 

Price of the land — From $30 to $100. (Normal.) 

Yield of oil — From 15 to 20 gallons per ton. 

Specific gravity of the oil — Averages, .8900. 

Fractionation of the oil — 

150 degrees 17.75 % 

200 degrees , 11.75 % 

250 degrees ". 17.75% 

300 degrees 16.00 % 

Above 300 degrees 8.50 % 

Coke and tar 28.25% 

Temperature of distillation — Best at 850 to 900 degrees, F. 

Ammonium sulphate — From 5 to 20 pounds per ton. 

Total nitrogen — From .25% to 1.00%. 

Gas — From 500 to 2,500 cubic feet per ton. 

Remarks — Shale can be quarried for from 20c to 50c per ton. Can be crushed in an 
ordinary limestone crusher. Overburden where found from 10 to 15 feet of glacial 
drift. Unlimited quantity of shale. Formation homogeneous thruout. 

A little work has been done on the oil bearing shales of the Coal 
Measures. These, as a rule, contain a higher per cent of oil which in 
some samples investigated run as high as fifty gallons per ton. Mining 
conditions are different and more difficult in these shales. In some places 
these shales may be mined with the coal. 



220 Year Book 



FIELD WORK 



During the past summer season systematic field work was conducted 
in the northern part of the Coal Measure area of the state. The terri- 
tory included in the survey embraced parts of, or the whole of, Clay, 
Vigo, Parke, Vermillion, Fountain, Benton and Warren counties. 

The field work consisted of a study of the topographic, stratigraphic, 
structural and economic conditions of the area. 

The field party included the following members: W. N. Logan, John 
R. Reeves, Ralph E. Esarey, Glen G. Bartle, Marshall A. Harrell, 
Horace L. Barnett, Thos. C. Heistand, John I. Moore, Kenneth W. Ray, 
Elmer L. Lucas and William P. Rawles. 

A number of problems connected with the distribution and identifi- 
cation of the coal beds were solved. Samples of coal, oil shales, fire 
clays and other materials were collected for study in the laboratory. 
These studies will be carried on by the laboratory force as time from 
other duties permits. 

Dr. E. R. Cumings, assisted by Mr. P. B. Moore, made a study of 
the older rocks of the state and of Kentucky and Ohio with a view of 
correlating the rocks of the older divisions in the three states named. 

Dr. C. A. Malott with Mr. Chas. Butts of the United States Geo- 
logical Survey made a study of the Chester Division of the Mississippian 
period in Indiana and Kentucky. They succeeded in establishing a cor- 
rect correlation of the subdivisions of the Chester in these two states. 

After the close of the regular field season Mr. H. L. Barnett and 
Mr. W. P. Rawles collected data in the southwestern oil fields. They 
secured the elevations of the mouths of the wells above sea level, located 
the wells, secured logs and data on production. 

The Chief of the Division, Mr. J. R. Reeves, Mr. Dick Guernsey and 
T. C. Heistand made some investigations of an archaic nature. 

STATE FAIR 

On account of the small amount of space furnished the Department 
of Conservation for exhibit purposes, it was impossible for the Division 
of Geology to make a creditable exhibit at the State Fair. Such an ex- 
hibit will be made whenever the space is available. During the week 
of the Fair and of the G. A. R. Encampment the number of visitors 
to the museum taxed its capacity. 

LABORATORY DETERMINATIONS 

A large number of minerals such as quartz, feldspar, mica, pyrite, 
also coals, clays, shales and other rocks and mineral substances were 
received from citizens of the state during the year with requests for 
information as to the value or possible usefulness of these substances. 
All qualitative tests were made without expense to the applicant, but 
for quantitative analyses, requiring the services of a chemist, the ex- 
pense was borne by the applicant for the service. Both qualitative and 
quantitative tests were made at a minimum of expense to the citizen. 



Department op Conservation 221 

The following is a summary of the determinations made by the 
division force during the year: 

Alunogen 3 Pyrite 60 

Calcite 5 Peat 7 

Chert 8 Soils 3 

Clay 57 Sands 19 

Coal 40 Quartz 54 

Conglomerate 1 Galena 3 

Chalcedony 1- Hyalite 2 

Diamonds 4 Iron ores 14 

Feldspar 2 Jasper 6 

Garnets 3 Limestones 23 

Gas 7 Zinc Ores 9 

Selenite 2 Water containing oil 30 

Mica 21 Waters 20 

Molding sands 7 Miscellaneous 37 

Oil shales 29 

Oil sands 81 Total 589 

Oils 31 



COMPENDIUM OF INDIANA GEOLOGY 

For two years the members of the Division of Geology have been 
working on a compendium of the geology of Indiana. The preparation 
of this work required an exhaustive study of the literature of the 
subjects treated, in addition to investigations carried on in the field 
and laboratory. No work of this character has previously been under- 
taken in Indiana, though the desirability of such a publication has been 
recognized for many years. 

The work is divided into a number of parts. The first part, deal- 
ing with the geography of Indiana, was written by Dr. S. S. Visher. 
It includes a discussion of the location of the state and the climatic 
and other effects which have been produced because of its location. The 
area of the state is compared with other states and the effects of size 
discussed. The quality of the land, the climate, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, population, principal cities and industries are some of the topics 
treated. 

The topographic features and the glaciology are discussed by Dr. 
C. A. Malott in the second part of the work. This part contains a dis- 
cussion of the general topographic features of the state, the physio- 
graphic provinces, regional units based chiefly on topographic conditions, 
the principal features of the Wisconsin and the Illinois glacial stages, 
their boundaries, the driftless area of the state and other physiographic 
features. 

The third part contains a discussion of the stratigraphic, paleo- 
geographic and paleontologic conditions of the state and was written by 
Dr. E. R. Cumings. The history of the development of our knowledge 
of the stratigraphy of Indiana is carefully and systematically set forth. 
Problems of nomenclature are solved, the stratigraphy presented by the 
use of detailed cross sections, and paleogeographic maps. A very com- 
plete bibliography accompanies this part of the work. 



222 Year Book 

Some of the principal features of the hydrology of Indiana are 
set forth by Dr. W. M. Tucker in part four. This part contains a 
drainage map of the state, a map showing drainage basins, rainfall re- 
cording stations and gaging stations, data covering the flow and dis- 
charge of streams, maps of lake basins and other hydrographic informa- 
tion. 

The fifth part, written by the Division Head, contains a discussion 
of the economic geology of the state. Building stones, cement materials, 
coal, clays, kaolin, iron ores, lime, marl, natural abrasives, mineral 
waters, oil and gas, peat, pyrite, road materials, sands, fertilizers, 
gypsum, gold, hydraulic limestone, lithographic limestone, manganese, 
diatomaceous earth, mineral paints, precious stones, salt and sulphur are 
the topics discussed. 

The sixth part contains a discussion of the oil bearing shales of 
Indiana and was prepared by Mr. J. R. Reeves. The report discusses 
the distribution of the New Albany shale, its thickness, mineability, oil 
content, structure, accessibility, methods of extraction best suited to it, 
and the quantity of oil recoverable. 

OTHER LINES OF INVESTIGATION 

During the year data was collected in the field and laboratory on 
a large number of the mineral resources of the state. Samples of clay 
and shales were collected. The physical and chemical properties of these 
will be determined in the laboratory. Samples of building stones, 
abrasives, molding, foundry and glass sands, cement materials and road 
materials were collected. The investigation of all these materials will 
be made the subjects of future reports. 

NATURAL GAS SUPERVISION 

The supervision of natural gas conservation and the plugging of 
abandoned oil and gas wells is in charge of Theodore Kingsbury and 
his deputies: C. N. Brown, Geneva; J. P. Horton, Montpelier; John 
Ersinger, Sullivan; O. H. Hughes, Sharpsville; Howard Legge, Bloom- 
ington; Geo. Smith, Owensville; Herschell Ringo, Muncie; John Watson, 
Petersburg, and E. E. Wherry, Shoals. 

Indiana law requires that wells drilled into gas or oil bearing rock 
that are to be abandoned shall be plugged in a specific manner described 
in the law, the object being to prevent any leakage of salt water, etc., 
from the lower strata to mix with fresh water strata nearer the surface 
or into nearby oil or gas domes. The plugging of such, the law stipu- 
lates, shall be done under the supervision of the Supervisor of Natural 
Gas or a deputy, for which there is a fee of $10 for each well plugged. 

During the year the Supervisor of Natural Gas and deputies in- 
spected the plugging of 424 wells. The previous year 406 wells were 
plugged. The wells plugged during the year were distributed in twenty- 
eight counties as follows: 



Department of Conservation 223 

% 

Jay 74 Hancock 7 

Pike 41 Shelby 7 

Wells 38 Marion 6 

Sullivan 81 Daviess 6 

Gibson 29 Clay 4 

Delavi^are 28 Hamilton 4 

Tipton 25 Madison 3 

Randolph 19 Greene 2 

Adams 18 Wabash -. . . 2 

Grant 17 Dubois 1 

Huntington 15 Lake 1 

Blackford . 10 Martin 1 

Miami 10 Vigo 1 

Henry 9 

Howard 8 Total 424 

Rush 8 

For the inspection of these wells $4,240 was collected, of which 
$3,392 was paid to deputies ($8 for each well plugged) and $848 turned 
into the general fund of the Department of Conservation as a partial 
offset to the office expense incurred as a result of conducting the work. 

A general complaint has been expressed by oil men against the law 
passed by the last legislature requiring one well to be drilled on each 
lease every year, in order that the lease might be held. If this is not 
done the lease, with the exception of small tracts surrounding any pro- 
ducing wells, reverts to the owner. 

OFFICE WORK 

The Assistant Geologist and the stenographer handle the routine 
office work of the division. This work consists in answering letters 
requesting information on a multitude of phases of our natural resources, 
of mailing reports in response to requests or in cases where information 
asked for is contained in available reports, and in conferences with in- 
dividuals who come to the office for information. Considerable time is 
taken in working on reports, collecting information, proof reading pub- 
lications issued by the division, cataloging well records and publications 
received, attending to bookkeeping and other clerical work of the division. 
The Assistant Geologist also supervises the plugging of wells which 
cannot be reached by the deputy inspectors. 

Following is a summarized report of the office work for the year 
ending September 20, 1921: 

Office Laboratory Total 

Letters received 2699 350 3049 

Letters mailed 2457 400 2857 

Reports distributed — 

Geological 262 000 262 

Petroleum and natural gas in Indiana 385 15 400 

Kaolin ■. 126 10 136 

Personal conferences .. 1201 360 1561 

MUSEUM 

The museum received more visitors during the year than any pre- 
ceding year. Registered attendance for the fiscal year was 43,968, as 
compared to 11,378 the year before, an increase of 32,590. A con- 



224 



Year Book 




Department of Conservation 225 

servative estimate of the visitors not registering, or refusing to do so, 
would be 20 per cent. Taking this into consideration, the estimated at- 
tendance during the year w^as 52,761, an average greater than three 
visitors for every minute the museum was opened. 

The attendance, with few exceptions, showed a steady increase each 
month. In October, 1920, the first month of the fiscal year, there were 
2,769 visitors, and in September, 1921, the last month of the fiscal year, 
there were 7,105. 

The marked increase in attendance emphasizes the need of and 
justification for larger quarters for the museum. Visitors frequently 
complain of the crowded condition which makes it impossible to display 
the specimens advantageously or permit proper lighting, particularly in 
the lower parts of show cases. There is no doubt that many private 
collections of merit and value would revert to the state if better pro- 
visions were made for their care. 

Following is the list of donations received during the year: 

Peculiar Growth — This knot grew twenty-two inches underground 
on the root of a red oak tree on the farm of B. C. Whitlow, three miles 
southeast of Lebanon, Boone County, Indiana. While blowing stumps 
with dynamite this knot was blown out of the ground. 

Residue taken from the Basin of Outside Drinking Fountain, Indiana 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Indianapolis, Ind. — Analysis (quali- 
tative) showed the sample to be mainly chlorides and carbonates, prob- 
ably those of calcium and magnesium. From Board of Health office. 

Petrified Wood — Polished. From the Governor's office. 

Bullets — "Yank and Johnny," from the Battle of Atlanta. Gathered 
after the battle by W. H. Cobb, 10th Indiana Volunteers. 

Plow Paper Weight — Presented to state of Indiana by Wm. Jen- 
nings Bryan. Sent from the Governor's office. 

Skeleton — From mound in Guthrie Township, Lawrence County. 

Sea Shells — An assortment of ocean shells — sixty-five in number. 
Donated by Harold Brown, Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis. 

Regalia — I. 0. O. F. Presented to Jos. Kendall, Shelbyville, Ind., 
in 1852. Donated by his daughter, Mrs. Lyda Eves, Indianapolis. 

Watch — Taken from body of a German soldier at Chateau Thierry, 
France, July 4, 1918. Found and donated by Chas. P. Darrough, Bat- 
tery A, 102nd Field Artillery, 26 Division Street, Indianapolis. 

Knife — Found on battlefield of Chattanooga by S. G. Conlee, In- 
dianapolis. Donated by him. 

Moth (Luna) — Donated by A. L. Barthel, Indianapolis. 

Octopus — Caught by Burge Schooney, Bay Harbor, Florida. Do- 
nated by Albert W. Sullivan, Indianapolis. 

Pioneer Fa/t^m Implements — Wooden Flail, Scoop, Hay Forks, etc. 

Model of Box Feed Cutter — Made by Dr. J. A. McGee, Big Springs. 
Donated by Clarence Biddle, Indianapolis. 

Chinese Battle Flags — Captured in the "Boxer" War August 12, 
1900, at "The Forbidden City," Pekin, China. Donated by Homer Ingle. 

Sword Hanger — Supposed to have been worn by General Israel 
Putnam. 

15—19930 



226 Year Book 

Portion of Wood — From Ship "Alliance," the first vessel to fly the 
"Stars and Stripes" after their adoption. 

Photograph (Frmned) — Delegates to the State Convention, G. A. R., 
Evansville, Indiana, May, 1916. Donated by C. W. Chappell, Co. F, 25th 
Indiana Infantry, Indianapolis. 

G. A. R. Emblem Flag — Donated by Miss Hattie Vaughn, Indianap- 
olis. 

Arrow Heads — Louis Hild, Indianapolis. 

British Bayonet — Harold Stewart, Indianapolis. 

U. S. Navy Gas Mask — Donated by George E. Edenharter, Indian- 
apolis. 

Limestone — Donated by Zenia Egnew, Carmel, Indiana. 

Japanese Sash, Sword and Scabbard — Ross Boggs, Indianapolis. 

Infant's Shoe — Made in 1812. Donated by Cornelius Bowen, Knights- 
town, Indiana. 

Chert Cemented by Gallicate — Donated by W. F. Thompson, Green- 
wood, Indiana. 

British Soldier's Button — From battlefield of Vimy Ridge, France. 
Donated by J. McCormick. 

Bible — Printed in 1812. Presented by E. J. Chandler, Bicknell, 
Indiana. 

Gun Barrel — Used at the battle of Tippecanoe. 

Johnny Cake Baker — Donated by E. J. Chandler, Bicknell, Indiana. 

Jack Knife Work — Two pieces. Donated by D. Onear, Indianapolis. 

Fragment of Marl — Baked, not burnt, from Saratoga Mt., Florida. 
Donated by Mrs. Ella Mussellman. 

Laurel Wood Ring — Carved by S. D. Anderson, 17th Regiment, In- 
diana Volunteers, during Civil War. Presented by Mrs. R. Riley. 

Collection Sea Bird Eggs — Sixty-five in number. Donated by 
Glenn Houston Craynor. 

Wild Passenger Pigeon — Mounted. Presented by W. S. Ratcliffe, 
Richmond. " 

Newspaper — Printed -on wall paper during the siege of Vicksburg, 
Miss., 1863. Presented by Andrew Kunkel, 7th Indiana Volunteers. 

Book — Carved from a laurel growing on side of Lookout Mountain, 
taken while Confederates yet held possession of the summit of mountain 
range. Book was made while lying in trenches at foot of mountain 
during the siege October, 1868, by W. F. Cobb, 10th Indiana Volunteers. 
Donated by Dr. Geo. Edenharter, Central Insane Asylum, Indianapolis. 

Petrified Moss — From Fountain County, Indiana. Donated by B. 
M. Yates, Kingman, Indiana. 

Beaver Cutting-^— From Algonquin Park, Ontario. Donated by — 
Comstock. 

Souvenir Cards — Found in upper lefthand pocket of blouse of Oral 
Dean, private, first class, 150th Field Artillery, Rainbow Division. Killed 
by a piece of shrapnel at Chateau Thierry, France, July 19, 1918. Pre- 
sented by his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Dean. 

Paxton Collection from Bluffton, Indiana, added this year, remains 
unpacked. 



Department ©f Conservation 227 

GOLD IN INDIANA 
W. N. LOGAN, State Geologist. 

A large number of specimens of so-called gold reach the office of 
the Division of Geology and its laboratory each year. These specimens 
are sent in by citizens of the state who think they have discovered some- 
thing of value. In most instances the minerals are either pyrite or 
mica of cupric or brassy hue. Occasionally a copper or zinc mineral 
is sent in and very rarely a specimen containing native gold. The pyrite 
is a compound of iron and sulphur and the presence of the sulphur may 
be easily detected by the odor when the mineral is heated. In some 
instances vein pyrite carries gold, but little, if any, vein pyrite occurs 
in Indiana. The pyrite of the state is associated with sedimentary rocks 
under conditions not favorable to the formation of vein gold. 

The mica is a silicate mineral which splits in thin plates and under 
weathering frequently turns a golden hue. These minute flakes may be 
distinguished from flakes of native gold by the fact that in water they 
will remain partly suspended for a short time, as they are of a much 
lighter specific gravity than native gold. The copper and zinc minerals 
which are mistaken for gold are usually sulphur bearing but sometimes 
the native copper is found. 

OCCURRENCE OF GOLD 

Gold is found in veins usually associated with igneous rocks or in 
placer deposits. The gold in the veins may occur as free gold (native) 
in quartz, as tellurides or other compounds, or associated with other 
metalliferous com.pounds such as silver, lead, zinc and copper. These 
gold bearing veins are associated with regions where there have been 
profound movements of the rocks of the crust of the earth and near 
enough to regions of vulcanism so that mineralizing thermal waters have 
penetrated the surficial rocks. It is probable that no where in Indiana 
have the essential conditions for auriferous veins been met. It is pos- 
sible that if the domes, such, as the Kentland Dome, of northern In- 
diana, have been the result of vulcanism, some deep seated mineraliza- 
tion may have taken place, but, if so, there seems to be no indication 
of such action in the exposed rocks. 

PLACER GOLD 

The weathering of gold bearing rocks and veins produces a con- 
centration of native or free gold in surface deposits of sand and gravel 
which are called "placers." Placer deposits occur in the beds of streams, 
in the alluvium of valleys, and in the benches or terraces of valleys. 
The gold in the placer is in nuggets, flakes and grains. Nuggets vary 
in size from a small fraction of an ounce up to as high as 2,280 ounces. 
Of the smaller grains it may require 2,000 of them to make one cent's 
worth of gold, yet they may form a "color" which can be recognized 
in the prospector's pan. 

The gold of the placer settles to the bottom of the loose sand and 



228 Year Boo«[ 

gravel, because of its higher specific gravity, and is found near the 
contact of the sand and gravel with solid bed rock. Gold-bearing gravels 
may also contain magnetite sands derived from the disintegration of 
magnetic iron ores. These grains are also of high specific gravity and 
settle toward the bottom of the gravel deposit. Thus it happens that 
the grains of gold are often found in black sands. 

The gold of the placer is separated from the sand and gravel by 
some process of washing away the lighter particles by processes called 
"panning," "cradling" and "sluicing." 

GOLD IN INDIANA 

Small quantities of native gold have been found in many of the 
counties of Indiana which are near or border on the driftless areas. The 
gold is the placer type, i. e., it occurs in sands and gravels lying in 
depressions in the bed rock. The gold particles vary in size from 
microscopic to as large as one-fourth of an ounce. The particles are 
usually found associated with magnetite sands. 

SOURCE OF THE GOLD 

The presence of small pieces of vein quartz carrying particles of 
metallic gold in the glacial drift of Indiana has led to the conclusion 
that the gold of the state has been brought from so^ne auriferous area 
of the great crystalline belt of rocks lying beyond the boundaries of 
the state to the northward. These gold bearing rocks were picked up 
by glaciers, transported by them and finally deposited within our bounda- 
ries. Not only was auriferous vein stone carried but also gold bearing 
igneous and metamorphic rocks. With the disintegration of these rocks 
by weathering agents came the concentration of the gold in the placers. 

ECONOMIC VALUE 

The gold placers of Indiana have little economic value. The cost 
of securing a water supply large enough to handle a large amount of 
sand and gravel in a short period of time prevents economic mining. 
Small winnings may be made by the "pan" prospector, but fair wages 
are not to be expected. 

SUMMARY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF GOLD IN INDIANA 

The following pages give a summary of the distribution of gold in 
some of the counties of Indiana. The facts recorded have been obtained 
from the publications named in the bibliography at the end of the article 
and to these writers the credit is due. 

The earliest printed record of the finding of gold in Indiana was 
found in the Journal of the Franklin Institute for June, 1850, as follows : 
"Professor Frazer read to the meeting (of the Franklin Institute) a 
letter from Professor T. A. Wylie, of Indiana University, announcing the 
discovery of gold in the vicinity of that place and exhibited specimens of 
the gold and of the black sands in which it is found. The gold has been 
found in the beds of the rivulets in Morgan County about twenty miles 



Department of Conservation 229 

northeast, in Jackson County about twenty miles east, and in Greene 
County about fourteen miles west of Bloomington, as well as at certain 
intermediate points but not in the immediate vicinity. Where it has 
been found, it is always in connection with a black sand called 'emery.' 
This sand is found at the bottom of the streams usually at upper end 
of sandbars, or on margins of the streams where there is a sudden turn, 
and in such places as it would be naturally deposited on account of its 
density. The coarse gravel is sifted and washed in the usual way until 
nothing remains but the dense black sand. Through use of the micro- 
scope and magnet, the gold in flat scales is separated." 

BROWN COUNTY 

The northern boundary of this county is about thirty miles nearly 
due south of Indianapolis. It contains 320 square miles. High ridges 
surround Brown County on all sides, while from east to west and south- 
west, three similar ridges traverse the county, all connected on the divide 
near Trafalgar in Johnson County. The first and most northern con- 
stitutes the southern bluff of Indian Creek and is called "Indian Creek 
Ridge;" the second, south of Bean Blossom, is known as "Bean Blossom 
Ridge," and the third is Central Ridge. Only the northern third of 
Brown is within the glaciated region. The northwestern part of Hamblin 
Township a^d the greater portion of Jackson Township are covered with 
drift accumulations as far south as Bean Blossom Ridge, the drift being 
found on the slope of this ridge nearly 200 feet above the water in the 
stream. Boulders of granite, gneiss and jasper, three to five feet in 
diameter, occur frequently in this region. In Salt Creek Valley, north- 
east of Nashville, but little drift was seen. Bean Blossom Ridge, then, 
marks the southern limit of the first and only glacial invasion of Brown 
County and it is only north of this ridge that gold in anythinjg like 
paying quantities is found in the county. 

The long continued melting of ice, loaded with greenstone, quartzite 
gold and magnetite deposited quantities of these imported materials in 
Bean Blossom Valley. Gold is found in the bed or on the bars of all the 
brooks that flow into Bean Blossom from Indian Creek Ridge and on the 
streams which flow from the foot of the "drift backbone" in the north- 
east corner of the county. Fine dust and minute scales may be found 
further within the county wherever black sand and small pebbles indi- 
cate former currents of ice water as far south as Elkinsville. During the 
excitement a few years ago, several companies took leases, made sluice- 
ways and prepared long rockers. But the returns were not satisfactory. 
It is probable that the best "pay dirt" lies at the deepest part of the 
rocky trough in which the creeks have their course. By bores, the line 
of greatest depth may be ascertained and by shafting, the richest dirt, 
possibly in paying quantities, may be brought to the surface. Reasoning 
from the facts observed, this would be true of Bean Blossom, and espe- 
cially from its greater width and probable depth, also of Indian Creek 
Valley. This is mentioned as a reasonable deduction, warranted by the 
facts and not for the purpose of exciting a mining fever. It was esti- 
mated that the amount of gold found in the county to 1874 equalled 



230 Year Book 

$10,000 value, and the best nugget weighed at $1.10. At least seventy 
square miles of northern Brown County lies within the drift covered 
gold bearing region of the first glacial invasion. 

The quality of the gold found is of the best, as it will average 
twenty-two or more carats, as against sixteen to eighteen for California 
gold and fourteen to sixteen for Klondike gold. 

Along each side of the streams in the county mentioned is a strip 
of bottom land of varying width composed of gravel, clay and soil, the 
gravel resting upon the bed rock, which is the blue Knobstone shale. 
It is this gravel next to the bed rock that is richest in gold. Most of the 
surfaces of these strips are cultivated and the owners will not allow the 
"gold hunters" to pan except in the beds of the streams. These beds 
have most of them been washed many times in succession, a new supply 
of gold being eroded during each freshet from the gravel beds along 
the banks. These beds which form the base of the lowlands were formed 
during the melting of glaciers when streams flowing through the valleys 
were much wider and stronger than now. The gravel and sand com- 
posing them was then deposited and the soil for the most part has been 
formed since then by decaying vegetation and annual overflow. 

"After every freshet, the children of the vicinity seek gold along the 
rocky bottom of each rill and stream and often find pieces worth twenty- 
five to forty cents. Much of this is found lodged in minute crevices at 
the bottoms of small waterfalls. A few of the natives do litlle else than 
pan gold for a livelihood." One of them, Uncle John Merriman, of 
Brown County, now deceased, panned more or less every year for nearly 
seventy years. "The largest nugget he ever found was taken on Bean 
Creek. It weighed 132 grains and was valued at $5.50. He found a 
number of pieces which ran as high as $1.00 to $1.25 in value, but most 
of what he secured was in the form of minute flattish particles. He 
estimated, that the gravel beneath the soil of the lowlands would average 
twenty-five cents per cubic yard in gold. On two occasions Mr. Merri- 
man kept a careful account of results of a month's work. Sundays ex- 
cluded, one month yielded him $34, another $40, He claimed that he 
could average $1.25 a day during the panning season, which runs from 
March to November except in the summer drought." 

CASS COUNTY 

"This county lies about eighty-five miles a little west of north of 
Indianapolis, containing 420 square miles which is wholly within the 
drift covered area. In the vicinity of Logansport, numerous beds of 
gravel ranging in thickness from one to thirty-two feet lie immediately 
above bed rock of Devonian and Niagara limestones. A number of 
small flakes of gold have been incidentally picked up without panning, 
which proves that gold is widely distributed in the drift gravel deposits 
of the state. Most of these deposits are so deeply buried beneath clay, 
sand and soil of different materials that there is no way of determining 
the presence of gold and no way of securing it. It is only along the 
edges of the moraines or where gravel deposits rest on outcrops of bed 
rock that the gold bearing gravel is accessible." 



Department or Conservation 231 



CLARK county 



"This county, lying in the southern part of the state, was partially 
covered by the first glacial invasion. Rudolph Bastian states that in 
the black sand stratum, he can find numerous particles of gold in every 
panful v^hich he washes. The black sand and garnets are finer than 
those found farther north and it may be that the deposit is but the 
diluvium from the streams flowing from the melting glacier of the Brown 
County region." 

DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES 

"The most remarkable prolongation of glacial drift southward is 
seen in Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana, and Boone County, Ken- 
tucky. In the first two named counties the drift is found in its greatest 
force. A low bed of sand and gravel resting upon the Silurian bluish 
clay shale contains a portion of gold dust and gold washing has been 
carried on here in a small way for years. If hydraulic washing could 
be resorted to, it is possible that considerable gold might be washed out. 
Some portions of this Laughery drift are so rich in gold that it is seen 
with the unaided eye. The gold is found in the form of dust, flattened 
scales and small nuggets." 

FRANKLIN COUNTY 

"This county is wholly within the bounds of the first glacial in- 
vasion. In the northwest part of the county in Laurel and Posey town- 
ships, upon Sim Creek and its branches, gold is generally disseminated 
in very small particles. A common panful of gravel and sand when 
washed out shows from two to three particles of gold in thin scales. 
None have ever been found larger than a grain of wheat. It is doubtful 
whether the quantity is sufficient to pay the expenses of washing it out. 
Gold has been found upon Little Duck Creek, and here, as elsewhere, is 
associated with black sand." 

GREENE COUNTY 

"This county lies west and south of the center of the state. The 
border of the first glacier passed in a northeast southwest direction 
through its eastern half. Gold occurs with black sand, which is all the 
record shows us concerning gold vdthin the county." 

JACKSON COUNTY 

"This county lies south of the central portion of the state com- 
prising 520 square miles. The border of the Illinoian Glacier passed 
through the eastern half of the county and its alluvium covers much of 
it. Gold has been found in a number of localities, chief among which is 
the bed of a stream near Freetown. Scales and particles to the value 
of about $5 were panned from the gravel and sandbars. The gold is 
not present in sufficient quantity in any part of the county to pay for 
working it." 



232 Year Book 

jefferson county 

"In this county, which is in the southeastern part of the state, 
wholly within the boundary of the Illinoian drift, gold has been panned 
only on a stream about six miles north of Madison. No attempt to 
pan the gold from the gravel of the stream has been made." 

' JENNINGS COUNTY 

"Some particles of gold have been panned from the bed of the south 
fork of the Muscatatuck. This gold was found in combination with the 
black sand washed down from the glacial drift of the uplands. The 
excitement occasioned by this discovery was very great at the time, and 
some useless labor was spent in sinking a shaft, as the drift and accom- 
panying gold dust was foreign to the state. It was useless to penetrate 
limestone strata below" in search of it." 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

"This county in the western central part of the state lies wholly 
within the drift of the second glacial invasion. The boulder drift deeply 
covers the eastern, northern and northwestern parts of the county, bear- 
ing internal evidence of its origin as imported from the Laurention beds 
north of Lake Superior. When long concentrated by currents of water, 
some notable deposits of gold dust and magnetite occur, associated on ac- 
count of their approximate specific gravity on the bars and riffles of the 
water courses. More than $50 worth of gold dust and magnetite have 
been panned out by collectors on the ford bar just above Iron Bridge 
across Sugar Creek. Near the junction of Lye and Sugar Creeks sev- 
eral dollars worth of gold occurs in flat scales'." 

MORGAN COUNTY 

"Morgan County lies just southwest of Marion County near the 
center of the state and comprises 409 square miles. The west fork of 
White River flows diagonally through the county from northeast to 
southwest. The principal tributaries of White River from the north, 
along whose beds and lowlands most of the gold of the. county occurs, 
are White Lick, Sycamore Creek and its tributary, Gold Creek, High- 
land Creek, Lamb's Creek, Burkhart's Creek, Fall Creek and Butler's 
Creek. 

"The northern third of Morgan County in which most of the gold 
occurs, is covered by the drift of the second glacier and the gold is a 
part of that drift. In the southern part of the county, the drift is 
that of the first Illinoian glacier which embraced all of the territory 
included in the county. From each of these glaciers whose crests doubt- 
less towered far above the hills preventing their further movement 
southward, rapid streams flowed and bore down the gravel, clay and 
sand with their accompanying gold, now found in beds beneath the 
lowlands of the present existing streams. 

"Gold has been found in the tributaries of Sycamore and Lamb's 
Creeks and some of the more skillful miners were able to wash out $2 
or $3 worth of gold per day for several weeks. But the excitement of 



Department of Conservation 233 

an actual 'placer mine' in Indiana brought together so many fortune 
hunters that every ravine was directly occupied and the sands were 
soon washed out and the 'gold fever' subsided. Within the last few years 
the excitement has been revived and gold washing, to a limited extent, 
has been resumed, paying from fifty cents to $1 per day. The gold is 
in very thin scales, almost invisible grains, and is remarkably free from 
alloy of any kind. 

"The origin of this gold is a geological problem. The only rational 
solution seems to be that which refers the gold to the blue clay, which 
is the lowest member of the drift. Where the clay forms the summits 
or sides of the hills, it is washed into gulches by the rains. The lighter 
and finer particles are borne onward with the current, while the heavy 
black sands and gold lodge among the rocks in the bottom. Fortunes, 
however, will never be made by gold mining in Morgan County. 

"Along the west branch of Highland Creek, gold in forty-one colors 
has been panned. On Sycamore and Gold Creeks, the best known Morgan 
County gold seeker, 'Wild Bill' Stafford, has washed gold for thirty 
years. He says that where he could get an average of twenty colors to 
the pan, it always paid to run a sluice box or rocker. Like most other 
gold hunters of Brown and Morgan Counties, Stafford washes only the 
bars of the streams, paying no attention to the gravel deposits under- 
lying the lowlands, mainly because the soil is cultivated and owners 
forbid its disturbance. He says it pays much better to work out and pan 
a whole bar sweeping the bed rock, cleaning out the cracks where the 
coarse gold has lodged, than to pan a little here and there. The old 
experienced washer can pan $1.50 to $1.75 per day. One piece of gold 
valued at $4.70 was the largest he had ever taken. 

"Special attention is given to the lowlands bordering Highland, 
Sycamore and Gold Creeks and their tributaries. In most places, these 
lowlands are composed of two or three feet of gravel resting upon the 
blue shale or bed rock. Above the gravel is a foot or two of clay and 
above this a sandy or alluvial soil from six to twelve inches deep. The 
streams, whenevej: full and swift, erode a portion of the gravel with its 
accompanying gold, carrying it forward and building up bars farther 
down their courses. In this manner the annual supply of gold particles 
in and along the immediate stream beds is replenished. 

"About forty-five square miles are overlain with the gold bearing 
drifts. Practical tests have been made of the lowland material in a 
number of places in northern Morgan County. These have proved that 
it runs from thirty to eighty cents per cubic yard. The most thorough 
test was made on the land of Dr. Clark Cook, just north of the post- 
office of Brey. Here twenty-five holes were dug through a strip of 
lowland to bed rock, the average depth being three feet nine inches. 
From each of these holes, seventy-five pounds of gravel were carefully 
panned, one-third being taken from the top, one-third from the middle 
and one-third from the bottom of the gravel stratum. In addition, mis- 
cellaneous gravel from the holes was added to bring the total up to two 
thousand pounds. From this, gold to value of $1.54 was secured. Allow- 
ing three thousand pounds as the weight of a cubic yard of gravel, and 
deducting two-thirds for soil and clay, barren of gold, but necessary 



234 Year Book 

to handle, the tests showed seventy-seven cents per cubic yard for the 
matter composing the lowlands. There is probably an aggregate of 
ten to twelve square miles of the gold bearing lowlands in Brown, Mor- 
gan, Johnson and Jackson Counties. 

"The most serious problem to be solved in the working of these placer 
deposits on a large scale is that of a permanent water supply, as most 
streams are dry several months in summer. By constructing permanent 
dams in several valleys, enough water could probably be conserved to 
tide over the dry season. There is no doubt but that large quantities 
of gold exist in the area mentioned. Only a person experienced in 
hydraulic and placer mining, who is conversant with the latest im- 
proved machinery for that purpose, will be able to state whether the 
process of its separation can be made a profitable one. One company 
with a large amount of capital at its disposal could, with a plentiful 
supply of water and machinery which would care for 98 per cent of the 
gold, perhaps make money in the thorough washing of these placer de- 
posits, but one is warned against investing money in small stock com- 
panies, several of which have been promoted for that purpose in the last 
few years. 

"Adam Linn, a miner in California and Oregon since 1854, made 
a careful investigation of the lowland deposits and he stated that the 
gold was much more abundant than he expected. His opinion was that 
these deposits would yield from twenty-five to forty cents per cubic 
yard, and thought it well to pipe in water twenty or thirty miles pro- 
viding a company could control a thousand or more acres of the low- 
lands. Otherwise the expense would be greater than the output. 

"In the southern part of Morgan County gold also occurs along all 
the streams and equals in richness to these of the northern part of the 
county. 

"In western Morgan County, in 'Burkhart Settlement,' gold is 
equally abundant. John Merriman, the veteran Brown County gold 
seeker mentioned above, here once secured 264 colors, by actual count, 
in one pan. 

"Doubtless these lowlands of Morgan County are richer in gold 
than those of similar tracts in Brown County. Gold is undoubtedly 
present in both counties and perchance some day a mining engineer 
with experience and up-to-date machinery will prove that it is present 
in paying quantities." 

PUTNAM COUNTY 

"This county is forty miles due west of Indianapolis and lies wholly 
within the 'Illinoian drift' area and the border of the Wisconsin drift 
passes across its center. Gold has been found in a stream flowing into 
Big Walnut Creek, two miles east of Bainbridge, in a thick bed of 
black magnetic sand. However, it does not exist in paying quantities." 

VANDERBURG COUNTY 

"This county lies in the southwestern corner of the state on the 
Ohio River, wholly outside the drift area. However, minute quantities 
of gold and nuggets of copper ore sometimes are found." 



Department o^ Conservation 235 

WARREN county 

"This county lies on the western border of Indiana, wholly within 
both drift areas. Virgin copper and gold are found in small quantities. 
These metals, with small nuggets of galena, were imported from the 
north. At Gold Branch of Pine Creek, on a gravel bar, a quantity of 
gold reported at $70 was collected. An energetic Californian can *pan 
out' from $1.00 to $1.25 per day. An equal amount of labor expended 
at any ordinary avocation will bring better returns. 

"Besides the above mentioned counties, gold has been found in min- 
ute quantities in Gibson and Pike, both along the border of the drift 
area, and in Sullivan County." 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. Seventh Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana — 

1875. 

2. Sixth Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana — 

1874. 

3. The Terminal Moraine of the Second Glacial Epoch in Third 

Annual Report, U. S. Geological Survey — 1883. 

4. Geological Survey of Indiana — 1878. Annual Report. 

5. "The Gold Bearing Drift of Indiana," in Proceedings of the 

Association for the Advancement of Science XXX — 1881. 

6. Geology of Franklin County. Geological Survey of Indiana — 

1869. Annual Report. 

7. Geological Survey of Indiana — 1873. Annual Report. 

8. Department of Geological and Natural Resources. Twenty-sixth 

Annual Report— 1901. W. S. Blatchley. 



POTASH IN THE NEW PROVIDENCE SHALE OF INDIANA 

John R. Reeves 

The word "potash" is a trade name at first applied to some of the 
, salts of potassium and later applied to other specific salts of this ele- 
ment. Potassium is an element belonging to a group known as the 
alkali metals and is similar in properties to sodium and lithium. Potas- 
sium does not occur free in nature, but in compounds, among which are 
the different forms of potash. The element is widely distributed, being 
found in sea and mineral waters, soils, saline beds, sea weeds, and in 
many rocks, shales, and clays, also in minerals such as orthoclase 
feldspar, glauconite, sericite and leucite. Although the element is widely 
distributed throughout the earth's crust, soluble compounds that can be 
put to immediate use are not so plentiful. Pure potash is potassium. 
oxide (K2O), this having been adopted as the unit of measurement for 

I all potash salts. Some of the most abundant salts of potassium are 
sulphate (K2SO4), potassium nitrate (KNO3), and potassium carbonate 
(K2CO3). The potash value of any one of these salts is determined by 
the per cent of K2O equivalent it contains. The marketed salts are 



236 Year Book 

seldom pure as they often contain other common salts as sodium chloride, 
sodium sulphate and calcium sulphate which are expensive to remove. 
Potash is sold, for example, as 75 per cent potassium sulphate which 
contains a 54 per cent equivalent of potassium oxide. In this case, 
of the material bought, 75 per cent is potassium sulphate and the 
potassium sulphate contains an equivalent of 54 per cent potassium 
oxide or pure potash, thus the buyer pays for the amount of potassium 
oxide only. 

USES OP POTASH 

Most of the potash used in the United States is for agricultural 
purposes as a fertilizer. As one of the essentials to plant growth, it 
is most likely to become exhausted. Caustic potash is used in the manu- 
facture of fine soaps and is the base of all soft soaps. Hydrated potas- 
sium carbonate is used in the manufacture of high grade glass, such 
as is used in electric light bulbs, cut glass and optical instruments. 
Potash is also used in the manufacture of explosives and matches. Cer- 
tain compounds of potassium are used in tanning leather, particularly 
chrome leather, in photography, electroplating, metallurgy, dyeing, medi- 
cine and in chemical laboratories. 

PRODUCTION OF POTASH 

Until 1917 most of the potash used in this country was imported 
from the Strassfurt deposits of Germany. This supply was shut off 
on account of the war until 1920, when a considerable amount was again 
imported. After the German supply became shut off in 1916 exploitation 
of known sources in the United States was begun and efforts were made 
to locate new deposits. Potash is produced from Searle's Lake of Cali- 
fornia, probably the richest source, from the Salt Lakes of western 
Nebraska and from the Great Salt Lake of Utah. Potash has also 
been produced from the sea water and from kelp or sea weeds. An 
organization has recently been effected to handle 10,000 tons of alunite 
daily from a deposit near Marysvale, Utah ; however, some production 
has been going on here since 1916. Alunite is a hydrous sulphate of 
aluminum and potassium whose symbol is (K2O. 3AI2O3. 4SO4. 6 H2O) and 
is a much more common mineral than at first thought. The mineral is 
also found in several other states. Glauconite or greensand has long 
been used for fertilizing purposes and as a source of potash and lime. 
It is found mostly in the Atlantic coastal states. 

THE NEW PROVIDENCE SHALE 

When potassium bearing igneous rocks as granite, syenite, diorite 
and gabbro, are disintegrated by erosion, the sediments formed are re- 
deposited usually as shales or clays. The chemical composition of these 
sediments is such that they are not readily subject to any chemical in- 
fluences such as oxidation or weak acids, that may prevail during their 
transportation from the place of origin to the place of deposition. After 
the deposition of such sediments has taken place or during deposition, 
cementation usually occurs in the form of calcium carbonate, iron sul- 
phide, or in certain cases some silicates. Having been deposited in 



Department qf Conservation 237 

shallow sea water, probably on a coast as sand, small quantities of the 
soluble salts carried in solution by sea water may also be deposited, such 
as magnesia, lithia and salt. However, the presence of these materials 
most probably came from waters subsequent to deposition. Unless 
metamorphism of such a deposit takes place or unless it is subjected 
to the heat of a nearby basic intrusion, its composition after solidifica- 
tion is not liable to change. 

A formation deposited under the above conditions is the New Provi- 
dence shale. Although it is not certain, the main body of this shale 
probably came from Appalachia in a disintegrated form as sediment. 
These sedimentary silicates not being subject to chemical change under 
the prevailing conditions existent during their transportation were de- 
posited in a sea of considerable depth. During this period of deposition 
which must have been long as the formation is 160 feet thick in places, 
it is possible that conditions prevailed under which the thin limestones 
of the formation as found in Jefferson County, Kentucky, were laid 
down.* Granite contains about 5 per cent potash, syenite 3 per cent, 
diorite nearly 2 per cent and gabbro less than 1 per cent. The New 
Providence shale contains from 3 to 6 per cent potash in the same form 
as found in the igneous rocks, about 60 per cent silica and 20 per cent 
alumina. 

It has been suggested by Dr. W. N. Logan that the potash of this 
formation is glauconite or of glauconitic origin. The pale green and 
blue-green color of the formation suggests this as well as the amount 
of potash in the formation, although slightly lower than most glauconites. 
Microscopic examination of the shale has failed to reveal the grains of 
glauconite. Glauconite sand when exposed to weathering darkens, the 
glauconite grains becoming black or almost black. This is not char- 
acteristic of the New Providence. It may be noted that the consump- 
tion of glauconite and the New Providence shale differs. Though that 
fact may or may not have little bearing on the origin of the potash. 
Analyses of the glauconite show its silica content to average 50 per cent, 
the total iron 23 per cent, and the alumina 7.5 per cent. Analyses of 
the New Providence show its silica content to average 50 per cent, the 
total iron to be 5 per cent, and the alumina 18 per cent. The origin 
of glauconite has often been connected with the presence of marine 
fauna, but there is no evidence of marine life of any form in the New 
Providence shale with the exception of the very few thin lenses of 
limestone found in its upper part in Kentucky. 

The first two of the following analyses were taken from Chas. 
Butts' Geology of Jefferson County. The third is taken from the 28th 
Rep., Ind. Geol. Sur., p. 513. 

K,0 SiOs TiOj AI2O3 H2O FejO, CaO MgO Na,0 

No. 1 3.98 63.38 .91 17.85 4.99 5.38 .38 1.47 1.29 

No. 2 4.85 60.44 .80 19.92 6.48 .28 2.01 1.00 

No. 3 4.87 60.40 .83 19.73 4.72 .78 2.10 .96 

No. 1 was taken from the lower part of the formation, Coral Ridge, 
Jefferson County, Kentucky. Used by the Coral Ridge Clay Products 

* Chas. Butts, Geology of Jefferson County, Ky., Geol. Sur. 



238 Year Book 

Company for bricks. No. 2 is the same as the first except that it is 
from the lower part of the formation. Blue shale, No. 3, was taken 
one mile west of New Albany and the shale was used for bricks. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE NEW PROVIDENCE 

The formation is the lower member of the Knobstone group of 
Indiana and is correlated with the Osage of the Mississippi Valley. 
The formation is underlain by the Rockford limestone and is capped 
with the Kenwood sandstone. 

The formation is composed of soft green and blue shale easily dis- 
integrated by weathering, particularly running water. The body of the 
shale is composed of very fine grains, over 85 per cent of which pass 
through a 200 mesh screen after being washed. These fine grains seem 
to be bound together by a greenish argillaceous material even finer in 
texture. The shale is plastic and can be easily molded. Locally there 
occur thin lenses of limestone and ellipsoidal nodules of siderite. 

In Indiana the formation is at least 120 feet thick at New Albany. 
Across the river in Jefferson County, Kentucky, the formation, accord- 
ing to Chas. Butts, is from 150 to 160 feet thick as near as can be 
determined. The shale is at least 100 feet thick in Bartholomew County 
about five miles west of Columbus. A shale is being used at Brooklyn, 
Indiana, for bricks which is thought to be the New Providence. The 
shale is found elsewhere in Indiana in Scott, Jackson and Morgan Coun- 
ties and probably others. 

POTASH DEVELOPMENTS 

In 1917 the Louisville Cement Company began to perfect a method 
by which to utilize the potash of the New Providence shale. As they 
were already using it in their cement mix, the matter of quarrying and 
a supply did not need to be considered. After long experimentation the 
following method, which has kindly been described by Mr. H. D. Baylor, 
superintendent of that company, was used at a profit. The method is 
essentially the same as other processes which convert the insoluble sili- 
cate to a soluble salt by replacement, the potash coming out in the form 
of a chloride or sulphate. 

The shale was quarried by means of a steam shovel, loaded into 
dump cars, and hauled to the mill. Here it was first put through a 
dry pan mill for initial reduction, then passed through a rotary dryer 
to drive off all the excess moisture. After being dried it was mixed 
with the proper proportion of limestone and salt to bring about the 
transformation of potash. When treated the mix consisted of: 

65 per cent New Providence shale (average 4V2% K2O). 
25 per cent limestone. 
10 per cent salt. 

This mixture of material was conveyed to the raw grinding de- 
partment where it was reduced to a fineness of 95 per cent passing a 
standard 100 mesh sieve. From here it was conveyed to a hopper directly 
over a briquetting machine. From this hopper a constant feed was 
drawn to the briquetting machine and at the same time it was sprinkled 



Department of Conservation 239 

with just enough water to thoroughly mix it and form a comparatively 
dry briquette. These briquettes as they came from the machine were 
discharged through a gravity pipe into the upper end of a seven by 
100 feet rotary cement kiln. 

At first the material was not briquetted but fed to the kiln in a 
dry form as in the dry cement practice, but the results obtained were 
not satisfactory, due to the material slipping on the bottom of the kiln 
instead of turning over, the result being that the top part of the mix 
was overburned and the bottom part underburned. The mixture was 
then introduced in a slurry form. This necessitated the use of large 
slurry tanks, pug mills and pumps. Using the slurry mixture in the 
kiln gave a very intimate mixture and the desired turnover, but another 
difficulty became apparent. When the material in the kiln began to 
dry enough to be gummy it began to build rings on the walls of the 
kiln, thus shutting off the kiln draft. It was found impossible to oper- 
ate the kiln for more than forty-eight hours without making a shut down 
to clean out the rings. Different methods were used to prevent the for- 
mation of rings, but none gave the desired results. After operating 
under these conditions for several months it was decided to make use 
of the good points of both dry and wet methods and eliminate their 
weak points. The briquetting machine was then installed, the product 
from it being a semi-wet material that was too dry to ring the kiln 
and at the same time coarse enough to give the necessary turn over 
in the kiln. 

The heat in the kiln was produced by means of pulverized coal, the 
same as used in cement practice. Care was taken not to let the tempera- 
ture go beyond 1,600 degrees F. Temperatures above 1,600 degrees 
cause the potash to volatilize and allow it to escape with the flue 
gases. The changes brought about in the kiln by this heat treatment 
consisted essentially of converting the insoluble potassium silicate to 
the soluble potassium chloride. In this heat treatment an average of 
80 per cent conversion -was effected. 

After the heat treated bricks were discharged from the kiln they 
were carried into storage and allowed to cool. From this storage they 
were carried to the grinding machinery where the material was ground 
to the fineness of corn meal. After the grinding it was carried to the 
mixing pug mill where enough water was added to make a slurry thin 
enough to pump with the ordinary type of slurry pump. After being 
thoroughly mixed and agitated with water (usually about twenty min- 
utes was enough to get all the potash in solution) it was pumped to 
continuous filter wheels where the original mixing water was extracted 
and the remaining dry cake on the wheel washed two or three times to 
extract the final traces of potash. By this method 98 per cent of the 
soluble potash was recovered. After going through the filter wheel 
process the solid residue was conveyed back to the cement mill where 
it was incorporated with the regular cement mix. The potash brine 
extracted in the filter wheel process was pumped to an evaporating 
plant where the potash and excess salt were separated. For the 
purpose of evaporation three Swenson single effect evaporators with 
the necessary auxiliaries were used. Difficulties were encountered here, 



240 Year Book 

due to the formation of scales on the tubes by the large amount of 
calcium sulphate in solution. Various softeners were used to reduce 
this with some results. Frequent scalings were also necessary. By the 
method described above a potash matter was extracted averaging about 
20 per cent potassium oxide. 

At the time the plant was closed down (about two years ago) 
potash was being produced at a cost of approximately $2 per unit or 
ten cents per pound pure potassium oxide. Mr. Baylor believes the 
cost of production can be reduced materially by increasing the output 
of the plant and improving the method gradually. 



AN INTRAFORMATIONAL BRECCIA OF THE ST. LOUIS LIME- 
STONE OF INDIANA 

John R. Reeves 

According to Graubau (1) an intraformational breccia is one formed 
from the sequential divisions of a single rock series, and according to 
C. D. Walcott's (2) definition, which is somewhat more explicit, an 
intraformational conglomerate is one formed within a geologic forma- 
tion of material derived from and deposited within that formation. It 
must be stated here before going further with the discussion, that the 
terms "intraformational breccia" and "intraformational conglomerate" 
have been used in describing similar formations. The difference be- 
tween the two is that the embedded material of a breccia is more angular 
and less water worn that that of a conglomerate, the matrix or cement- 
ing material being nearer the composition of the fragments of the breccia 
and the time that elapsed between the fragmentation and embedding 
less. However, these are only general distinctions and cannot be said to 
hold true in all cases. 

In speaking of the origin of intraformational conglomerates Wal- 
cott (2) says, "The presence of the conglomerate above the limestone 
beds, from some portions of which they were derived, leads me to be- 
lieve that the sea bed was raised in ridges and domes above the sea 
level and thus subjected to the action of shore ice if present, and the 
aerial agents of erosion. From the fact that the limestone upon which 
the conglomerate rests rarely if ever show traces of erosion where the 
conglomerate comes in contact with it, the inference is that the debris 
worn from the ridges was deposited in the intervening depressions be- 
neath the sea." It does not seem probable that a single layer a few feet 
thick lying in a shallow sea near a shore could be raised in ridges and 
domes above the sea level without a folding of the rocks below also, 
and this is not usually the case since the breccia is intraformational 
and the rocks above and below are parallel. But if there were special 
forces sufficient to cause the folding of such a layer, it is difficult to 
conceive of a thin rock of sufficient strength to withstand folding and 
subsequent erosion. 

F. W. Sardeson (3) thinks that "giant sea weeds anchored to the 
bottom, if entangled by rafts of other sea weeds driven by storms or 



Department op Conservation 241 

by sea current — a sort of sargasso — would appear to be a sufficient agent 
to tear up the bed of a shallow sea, at least under favorable conditions, 
over a very wide area. Earthquakes might be the cause of loosened 
stone on the bottom of the sea, or, again, of currents such as to cause 
dragging up of the bottom by sea weeds." These causes seem quite 
probable in some cases, but the hypothesis rather resorts to the unusual. 
Such informations as are under discussion are widespread throughout 
geologic time, and it seems there should be some more common cause 
for their origin. 

E. Wilson (4) supposes that the fragments "must have been simul- 
taneously deposited over several square miles and in water of variable 
depth and distance from the land. Though no striae have been found, 
the angularity and confused arrangements of the fragments, the fact 
that some of the largest have travelled a long distance, and the general 
absence of any attempt at stratification, the sudden transition in thick- 
ness and texture of the breccia, point possibly to glacial origin, as 
droppings, say, from the melting of icebergs or floes." This may be 
necessary to account for some formations in which the embedded material 
is of composition entirely foreign to the matrix or adjacent rocks, but 
such a formation, according to definition, is a conglomerate or normal 
breccia. 

In speaking of the distribution of pebbles due to organic growth 
in a conglomerate, after they had been formed, T. C. Brown (5) says, 
"At periodic intervals these beds of calcareous mud and intermingled 
pebbles slumped or slid along the sea bottom under the influence of 
gravity. At the time of the slump or slide the matrix around the pebbles 
consisted of incoherent lime-mud or paste. As it moved it developed 
unsymmetrical waves or ripples in its mass — and there remained until 
the lime-mud became transformed into limestone." 

Stose thinks that they were formed by thin layers breaking into 
small flat pebbles or shingle. When the tide came in, these flat frag- 
ments were washed together in all positions and held by a soft paste 
which surrounded them. This does not explain what caused the break- 
ing up of the fragments, but it is quite probable that tidal lime-muds 
such as we now find on shores could become the limestone matrix of 
these breccias. 

In his paper on the Shawangunk formation Schuchert (6) remarks 
that these fragments were formed by "local disruption of a thin bed of 
shale by storm generated waves in this shallow water deposit." 

W. N. Logan has suggested that the origin of these fragments may 
have been due to mud bumps such as are now found along the Gulf 
Coast, rising above the sea level, drying to hardness, and then be- 
coming broken up by storms. 

"Such rocks," writes Grabau (1) in speaking of intraformational 
breccias, "are composed largely of the finest lime-mud, accumulated in 
shallow water or in part even above the normal level of the sea. In 
form they probably constitute a sort of mud flat delta. On exposure, 
partial hardening permits the formation of a superficial crust, which 
may subsequently break or become deformed by the sliding of the entire 
mass seaward. If the surface layers alone slide, a fracturing will re- 

16—19930 * 



242 Year Book 

suit which produces a mass of angular or subrounded flat mud cakes, 
which will be held together, as a result of this sliding, in a compound 
mass, the fragments most frequently standing on end, but also inclined 
in all directions. They will be surrounded by the fine still fluid mud 
which wells up around them and in which these fragments become em- 
bedded. Thus is formed an edgeivise conglomerate." Such is Grabau's 
theory as to the origin and it seems that it can account best for the 
numerous intraformational breccias found in all geologic ages. 

It is generally admitted that these breccias were formed in a shallow 
sea near a shore. It is probable that wave action played an important 
part in either breaking up the fragments or in eroding them, or both. 
It is more probable that the material from which the fragments were 
derived came from the dried lime-mud on shore or thin hardened lime- 
stone layers capable of being shattered by wave action. The wave-like 
forms in which the embedded materials have been found, as described 
by Brown (5) show this and also show that they have been tumbled 
and washed by water. It is also possible that special causes may have 
produced certain breccias but these may not be applied as a general 
theory for most of them. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ST. LOUIS LIMESTONE BRECCIA 

This intraformational breccia is found near the middle of the St. 
Louis limestone (Mitchell) of Indiana, in McCormick's Creek Gorge, 
near Spencer. It may be traced along the north 'wall of the gorge for 
a distance of three hundred yards, and is from five to fifteen feet in 
thickness. 

The embedded fragments vary in size from one-half to four inches 
in diameter. In shape they vary from roundness to angularity, the 
greater part of them being subangular. The fragments are of soft 
sandy limestone and the matrix partly of blue argillaceous clay and 
partly of blue-gray hard limestone. There are no bedding planes, and 
the fragments are heaped together in a confused mass. There is no 
evidence of folding or faulting within the formation, but in a few cases 
the fragments show evidence of slickensided surfaces. No fossils were 
found. At fairly regular intervals there appear what might be crude 
wave forms, the depressions or troughs being filled with the hard blue- 
gray limestone which rests immediately on top of the breccia. In one 
place the breccia has been eroded through to the layer of limestone below 
and exhibits appearances which might lead to the belief that the erosion 
was due to a current of water. The overlying layer, as has been stated, 
is a blue-gray hard limestone, and the underlying one is gray-white and 
brittle, that is, characteristically St. Louis in this region. These layers 
are parallel to each other. The general dip of the strata in this region 
is to the southwest at the rate of thirty-five feet per mile. 

CONCLUSIONS 

In the formation of this breccia it seems probable that the shore of 
a shallow sea was covered with lime-mud, the upper exposed part being 
cracked and hardened by exposure to the sun, the lower depths being 



Department of*Conservation 248 

still quite wet and muddy. The whole slid or slumped seaward under 
the influence of gravity and in the sliding or slumping some of the frag- 
ments were slickensided. By wave and tidal action as well as from 
slumping the fragments were eroded and scattered out in a bed in which 
were left crude wave marks, and the soft mud was washed in among 
the mass of harder fragments, becoming part of the matrix. In a 
comparatively short time the mass of fragmented material became em- 
bedded in and was covered over by lime-muds and the whole solidified, 
forming an intraformational breccia. References: 

(1) Grabau, Principles of Stratigraphy, p. 530. 

(2) C. D. Walcott, Bull. Geo. Soc. Am., Vol. 5. 

(3) Sardeson, Geo. Soc. Am., Vol. 25, P. 315. 

(4) E. Wilson, Geo. Journ., Vol. 32, 1876. 

(5) T. C. Brown, Jour. Geo., Vol. 21. 

(6) Schuchert, Geo. Soc. Am., 1916. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF ENTOMOLOGY 



FRANK N. WALLACE, State Entomologist, Chief of Division. 

HARRY F. DIETZ, Assistant Entomologist. 

HAROLD E. TURLEY, Plant Pathologist. 

EVERETT SMITH, Inspector of Nurseries. 

FRANK B. WADE, Deputy Nursery Inspector. 

CHARLES 0. YOST, Chief Inspector of Apiaries. 

THOMAS C. JOHNSON, Deputy Bee Inspector. 

JAMES E. STARKEY, Deputy Bee Inspector. 

HELEN WARREN SEEGER, Clerk and Stenographer. 

The Division of Entomology must inspect all the nurseries in the 
state and issue Certificates of Nursery Inspection to those whose stock 
is free from injurious insect pests and plant diseases. It handles the 
apiary inspection and while doing this inspection work teaches better 
methods of beekeeping. Members of the division study the insect pests 
and plant diseases so as to be able to advise the citizens of the state 
as to the proper methods of combating insect pests and plant diseases. 
They inspect all nursery stock imported from Europe to see that no new 
pests are present and thus gain a foothold in the state. The division has 
police powers in order to enforce any regulations that may be issued 
so that new pests or plant diseases may be held in check, or eradicated 
if such is possible. 

NURSERY INSPECTION 

There were 196 nurseries whic?i were given a Certificate of Nursery 
Inspection entitling them to sell nursery stock this season. This is an 
increase over former years but the new nurserymen as a rule are only 
small fruit growers who sell berry plants as a side-line of their fruit 
business. We are insisting that any person selling plants must first 



244 Year Book 

receive a Certificate of Nursery Inspection from this office so that 
diseases and insect pests of these plants cannot be disseminated. 

Considering the dry weather most of the nurseries were in ex- 
cellent condition. It seems remarkable that the growers were able to 
accomplish results that they have under the adverse weather con- 
ditions during the middle of the summer. Some of the berry growers 
did not have their places in condition to be issued a certificate but when 
they were shown the poor quality of their plants and made to under- 
stand the requirements of the office they did not insist on receiving their 
certificates. 

This year we have listed the acreage which the nurserymen have 
set with nursery stock. This will give the purchaser an idea as to 
the size of the nursery he is doing business with. This does not mean 
that the smaller nursery is in any way inferior to the larger one but 
in several cases we have found nurserymen with a very small acreage 
advertising the fact that they had an extremely large nursery and we 
feel the purchasers of nursery stock are entitled to know the size of the 
nursery they are doing business with. We have often had inquiries as 
to just what acreage a nurseryman has in growing stock and we have 
been requested many times to require the nurserymen to put. their 
acreage on their shipping tags. 

As an illustration of the value of nursery inspection I might cite 
the conditions which prevail at this time in Clark and Washington coun- 
ties in regard to red raspberry culture. A few years ago there were 
hundreds of thousands of dollars of red raspberries shipped from the town 
of Borden, in Clark County, and during the berry season the Monon rail- 
road ran a special express train to carry these berries to the Chicago 
market. This train left each night during the picking season and 
arrived in Chicago early enough to put the berries on the market the 
following morning. Just when this market was being developed our 
nursery inspectors found a serious disease of the red raspberry plant, 
called crown gall, in some of the fields. We refused to issue a cer- 
tificate to the owners of these diseased fields and were able to prevent 
the sale of these plants; but a great many growers resented the fact 
that they were not permitted to sell their stock and allowed their neigh- 
bors to come in and dig their own plants free. We issued warnings 
to the growers that these plants were not fit to be used but they planted 
them in spite of our warnings and thus spread the disease through the 
entire neighborhood. This disease has now become so widespread in 
that district that it has almost forced the berrymen to stop growing red 
raspberries in that section and in Clark county alone I believe the people 
have lost at least a half million dollars worth of business each year. The 
soil in that section seemed to be ideally adapted for berry growing and 
it is a shame that the people were so shortsighted that they could not 
see our regulations were for their own protection and that we were not 
trying to boost the business of a few growers who had the clean patches. 
It is to be hoped that the Borden situation will be an object lesson to the 
growers of the state and that the same shortsighted methods will not 
prevail again. 



Department of Conservation 



245 



INDIANA NURSERYMEN— 1921 



Name Town 

Abraham, Omer R., Martinsville, R. R. 1 
Allen, Chas. B., West Baden, R. R. 2 
Allison Brothers, Columbus, R. R. 4 
Anglin, Edward, Atwood 
Baker, Frank, Goshen 
Barnard, C. H., Westville, R. R. 1 
Baur and Steinkamp, Indianapolis 

Beck, E. H., Michigan City, R. R. 1 
Beckner, H. G., Greenfield 
Beer, Henry, Milford, R. R. 2 
Bennett, H. G., Lafayette 
Bennett, Robert A., Grandview 
Bertermann Brothers Co., Indianapolis 

Bierly, J. D., Borden, R. R. 2 

Bierly, Otis R., Borden, R. R. 2 

Blankenbaker, D. 0., Borden, R. R 

Blankenbaker, E. E., Borden, R. R, 

Bogue, B. P., Fairmount 

Bolinger, W. F., Mishawaka 

Boiler, A. A., Francesville, R. R. 2 

Brammer, John E., Burns City, R. R 

Brant, J. R., Hessville. Box 11 

Brems, Charles, Kjiox, R. R. 3 

Brown, David A., Mishawaka, R. R 

Brown, James, Borden 

Burkhart, Henry, Indianapolis, R. R. E. 

Bums, W. 0., Pekin, R. R. 3 

Burns City Nursery, Burns City 

Burt, Charles J., Warsaw, R. R. 7 

Bush, Aaron, Marion, R. R. 1 

Bywater, William, Borden, R. R. 2 

Cain, Aldo E., Dublin 

Callahan, D. W., Pekin, R. R. 4 

Callahan, P. H., Pekin, R. R. 2 

Campbell, Harry I., Warsaw, R. R. 

Carlson Brothers, Hobart, R. R. A 

Cathcart, Alva Y., Bristol, R. R. 4 

Cato, Thomas, New Harmony 

Coats, Marion, Borden, R. R. 3 

Collins, Lamar, Underwood, R. R. 2 

Columbus Nursery and Fruit Farm, Columbus, 

R. R. 5 
Caugill, Charles E., Auburn 
Craun, W. R., Angola, R. R. 3 
Crawford, Mrs. William, Laporte 
Crowell, Frank, Goshen 
Crown Hill Cemetery Company, Indianapolis 
Cutler, D. L., Warsaw, R. R. 7 
Davis, John S., and Sons, Knox, R. R, 3 
Davis, J. W. Company, Terre Haute 
Durham, B. F., Borden 
Eaton, John L., Burns City 
Eichoff, Mrs. H. C. and Sons, 

Indianapolis, R. R. P 
Elwood Nursery, Elwood 
Evansville Nursery Company, Evansville 
Everett, Joe W., Hamilton 
Fairview Gardens, Elnora 



rt. No. Kind of Certificate 


192 


General nursery stock 


85 


Raspberry plants 


70 


General nursery stock 


137 


Small fruits 


159 


Strawberry plants 


118 


Strawberry plants 


27 


Greenhouse stock 



110 Small fruits 

78 General nursery stock 

142 Small fruits 

98 Greneral nursery stock 

35 General nursery stock 

194 Greenhouse stock and ornamentals 





64 


Small fruits 




8 


Strawberry plants 


2 


16 


Strawberry plants 


2 


14 


Strawberry plants 




116 


Small fruits 




106 


General nursery stock 




54 


Small fruits 


1.2 


129 


Small fruits 




119 


Strawberry plants 




96 


Small fruits 


.2 


117 


Small fruits 




15 


Small fruits 


LE. 


32 


General nursery stock 




63 


Small fruits 




10 


General nursery stock 




138 


Strawberry plants 




73 


Grape vines 




9 


Raspberry plants 




53 


Small fruits 




17 


Strawberry plants 




18 


Small fruits 


7 


134 


Strawberry plants 




120 


Strawberry plants 




156 


General nursery stock 




181 


Gate trees 




66 


Small fruits 




20 


Raspberry plants 



65 General nursery stock 

46 Perennials 

90 Strawberry plants 

105 Ornamentals 

190 Ornamentals 

45 Ornamentals 

139 Strawberry plants 

95 Strawberry plants 

77 Greenhouse stock 

61 Small fruits 

72 Small fruits 

97 Shade and ornamentals 

101 Ornamentals 

28 General nursery stock 

88 General nursery stock 

51 Shade trees 



Acres 

1 
4 
4 
4 

3 

65,000 
sq. ft. glass 

Yt 
Vl 
10 

2 
150,000 
sq. ft. glass 
10 
1 
2 
2 
1 

8 

m. 

10 

2 

2 

3 
20 

75 

1 
7 
1 
2H 

2 
1 

2 
IH 

3 

3 
3M 

21 
3 



7 

35 
1 
1 



246 



Year Book 



INDIANA NURSERYMEN-1921-Continued 



Name Town 

Farmers Nursery and Fruit Farm, Burns City 
Fawkes, M. G., Fremont 
Fendel and Squier, Rockport, R. R. 1 
Fisher, John F., Medora, R. R. 2 
Flory, A. E., and Sons, Logansport, R. R. 11 
Flory, D. M., Logansport, R. R. 11 
Fonner, W. A., Decatur, R. R. 7 
Fry Brothers, Lafayette 
Fullhart Nursery, Muncie 
Gaar Nursery, Cambridge City 
Garber, D. M.. North Webster 
Goshert, Chas., Warsaw. R. R. 2 
Graham, Charles F., Jeffersonville, R. R. 2 
Gray, Dan M., Borden, R. R. 2 
Gray, Sam, Pekin, R. R. 2 
Gray, William T., New Philadelphia, R. R. 1 
Green's Fruit Farm, Portland, R. R. 7 
Hasse's Home Niu-sery, Terre Haute 
Hagen and Squier, Rockport, R. R. 2 
Halleck Nursery Company, Fair Oaks 
Hans, James, Anderson, R. R. 6 
Heffley, W. H., Logansport 
Heller Brothers Company, Newcastle 

Hewes, Theo., Indianapolis 
Hill, E. G. Company, Richmond 

Hill, Joseph H. Company, Richmond 

Hilty, John J., Berne, R. R. 4 
Hobbs, C. M., and Sons, Bridgeport, 
Hoffman, R. P., Paoli, R. R. 1 
Hofreiter, Andy, New Harmony 
Hohman, S. A., Packerton 
Hoke, Jacob, Borden, R. R. 2 
Home Nursery, Hatfield 
Hood, G. W., Osceola, R. R. 1 
Hoosier Rose Company, Newcastle 

Indian Creek Nursery, Crandall 

Indianapolis Plant and Flower Co., Indianapolis 

Ireland, Charles A., Brownstown 

Irvington Gardens, Indianapolis 

Irwin, T. J., Mount Vernon 

Jackson, Burt, Borden, R. R. 3 

James, W. D., Shelbyvdlle, R. R. 3 

Jarrett, J. A., Montpelier, R. R. 3 

Johnson, Jeff, Borden, R. R. 1 

Johnson, William, West Baden, R. R. 2 

Jones, E. M., Mentone 

Keel, Thomas, Westville, R. R. 1 

Knipe, Thomas L., Kokomo 

Knox Nursery and Orchard Company, Vincennes, 

R.R.2 
Krider, Vernon, Goshen, R. R. 1 
Lafayette Nursery Company, West Lafayette 
La Hayn, William, Chesterton 
Laketon Nursery, Laketon 
Landis, Worthy, Angola, R. R. 3 
Lemon, Fred H. and Company, Richmond 



Cert. No. Kind of Certificate 


Acres 


57 General nursery stock 


2H 


92 Small fruits 


1 


161 Strawberry plants 


2 


175 General nursery stock 


4 


169 Small fruits 


5 


93 General nursery stock 


3 


40 Strawberry plants 


Vt. 


75 Small fruits 


8 


191 General nursery stock 


15 


52 General nursery stock 


10 


155 Small fruits 


2M 


133 Strawberry plants 


2 


121 General nursery stock 


Vi 


62 Small fruits 


3 


6 Strawberry plants 


1 


193 Peach trees 


¥2 


38 Strawberry plants 


v.. 


43 General nursery stock 


20 


162 Strawberry plants 


1 


148 General nursery stock 


6 


172 Small fruits 


1 


150 Small fruits 


^ ■ 


26 Greenhouse and Ornamentals 


70,000 




sq. ft. glass 


47 Strawberry plants 


1 


3 Greenhouse and Ornamentals 


250,000 




sq. ft. glass 


1 Greenhouse stock 


250,000 




sq. ft. glass 


41 Small fruits 


M 


50 General nursery stock 


250 


83 Ornamentals 


2 


189 General nursery stock 


2 


143 Strawberry plants 


H 


12 Strawberry plants 


Yi 


36 General nursery stock 


9 


81 Ornamentals 


H 


186 Greenhouse and ornamentals 


70,000 




sq. ft. glass 


68 General nursery stock 




s 124 Shade and ornamentals 




86 Strawberry plants 


Yz 


126 Shade and ornamentals 




180 Nut trees 


Yi 


188 Small fruits 


m 


22 Strawberry plants 


Yi 


166 Small fruits 


W2 


176 Strawberry plants 




84 Raspberry plants 


y^ 


153 Small fruits 




104 Strawberry plants 


iM 


184 Ornamentals 




3S, 

33 General nursery stock 


24 


168 General nursery stock 


30 


170 General nursery stock 




151 General nursery stock 


Y2 


130 General nursery stock 




113 Small fruits 


2 


2 Greenhouse stock 


50.000 


• 


sq. ft. glass 



Department op Conservation 



247 



INDIANA NURSERYMEN-1921— Continuec 



Name Town 

LeRoy, B. F., Laporte, R.R, 8 
Lewis, David G., Fairmount 
Light, J. M., Orland 
Lightner, Mrs. 0. E., Warsaw, R. R. 2 
Long, T. A., Elnora 
Loy, C. 0, Pendleton, Box 326 
Lung, Nicholas and Son, Garrett, R. R. 1 
McCloughan, B. E., Etna Green. R. R. 2 
McCoy's Nat Nursery, Lake 
McKinley, Dennis, Borden, R. R. 1 
McKinley, Mason, Borden, R. R. 1 
Maple Hill Rose Farm, Kokomo 
Merrill, H. R., Brownstown 
Miller, Arthur F., Borden, R. R. 3 
Model Nursery, Bristol 
Moffit, Frank, Carmel 
Moore, F. E., Wallen 

Morris, T. H. and Son, Cloverdale, R. R. 1 
Mort, John, Warsaw, R. R. 3 
Morton, J. A., Floyd Knobs, R. R. 
Munger, Roscoe, Orland, R. R. 1 
Murray, A. M., Goshen, R. R. 4 
Nation's Plant and Fruit Farm, Macy, R. R. 
National Show Gardens, Spencer 
Neal, Frank, New Harmony 
Nicholson, Jack, Borden 
Norris, George M., Mentone 
Ooley, Burt, Borden, R. R. "2 
Orinoco Nursery, Columbus 

Osborn, Alfred S., Odon 
Osborn, James T., Burns City 
Osborn, John D., Carthage, R. R 2 
Overman, R. J., Danville 
Park View Nursery, Muncie 
Patterson, R. T., Bloomfield 
Pearson, W. T., Marengo 
Pierce, A. D., Knightstown, R. R. 2 
Phelps, Edward, Warsaw, R. R. 2 
Phillips, Joe, Bloomfield 
Platner, S. C, Mishawaka, R. R. 2 
Preble, A. C, Marion 
Princeton Nursery, Princeton 
Ragle, Amos, Elnora 
Rasmassen, Anders, New Albany 
Rathburn, L. G., Orland, R. R. 1 
Reed's Nursery, Hanover, R. R. 1 
Rensch, Harley, Hamilton, R. R. I 
Rettic, W. D., South Bend 
Ridgeway Nursery, Borden, R. R. 2 
Riverside Nursery, Berne, R. R. 1 
Roerk, F. M.. Borden, R. R. 2 
Roerk, T. J., Borden, R. R. 3 
Rogers, R. H., Grovertown, R. R. 1 
Rogers, Sig, Bloomfield 
Schleicher, John, Borden, R. R. 2 
Schlichtenmyer. J. W., Brimfield, R. R. 1 
Schumaker, William A., Spencer 
Shields Brothers Nursery, Charlottesville 
Shields, Jesse, Portland, R. R. 4 
Shinn, A. B., Warsaw 



rt. No. Kind of Certificate 


111 


Small fruits 


115 


General nursery stock 


91 


Strawberry plants 


145 


Small fruits 


114 


Small fruits 


102 


Ornamentals 


100 


Strawberry plants 


136 


Strawberry plants 


146 


Nut trees 


173 


Strawberry plants 


177 


Strawberry plants 


163 


Ornamentals 


69 


General nursery stock 


67 


Small fruits 


157 


Raspberry plants 


94 


Small fruits 


99 


General nursery stock 


195 


Peach and cherry 


140 


Strawberry plants 


4 


Small fruits 


76 


Small fruits 


158 


Small fruits 


183 


Small fruits 


108 


Ornamentals 


182 


Gate trees 


174 


Small fruits 


135 


Strawberry plants 


7 


Strawberry plants 


23 


Shade, ornamentals and hardy 




perennials 


71 


Raspberry plants 


74 


Small fruits 


164 


Strawberry plants 


123 


Small fruits 


30 


Ornamentals 


128 


Small fruits 


82 


General nursery stock 


165 


Strawberry plants 


132 


Strawberry plants 


48 


General nursery stock 


107 


Small fruits 


149 


General nursery stock 


34 


General nursery stock 


58 


Small fruits 


5 


Ornamentals 


112 


Small fruits 


24 


General nursery stock 


89 


Strawberry plants 


125 


Ornamentals 


13 


Strawberry plants 


39 


General nursery stock 


60 


Small fruits 


19 


Strawberry plants 


109 


Small fruits 


49 


Small fruits 


11 


Strawberry plants 


87 


Strawberry plants 


122 


Peach trees and strawberry plants 


141 


General nursery stock 


31 


Strawberry plants 


144 


Ornamentals 



Acres 

2 

2 

H 

H 

1 

9 

1 



15 
2 
3 

1 
H 

H 
M 

2 

y2 

30 

4 

H 

2 

y2 

5 
1 
5 
3 

4 

1 
1 

H 



248 


Year Book 




INDIANA 


NURSERYMEN-l921-Continued 




Name Town 


Cert. No. Kind of Certificate 


Acres 


Sloan, James M. and Sons, Washington, R. R. 6 42 


General nursery stock 


5 


Smith, J. E., Muncie 


55 


General nursery stock 


1 


Sroufe, C. H., Larwill, R. R. 1 


154 


Strawberry plants 


1 


Stiles, Edwin B., Martinsville, R. R. 6 


56 


Small fruits 


3 


Stout, Floyd H., Indianapolis, R. R. 


59 


Small fruits 


1 


Stuckey, G. W., Bremen 


80 


General nursery stock 


M 


Sunrise Nursery, ffippus 


131 


Small fruits 


J€ 


Tate, Jacob and Sons, Mexico 


185 


Strawberry plants 


J^ 


Temperley's, Florists, Indianapolis 


196 


Greenhouse stock 


25,000 

sq. ft. glass 


Tharp, Lew, Kokomo, R. R. 1 


103 


Small fruits ■ 


Yt. 


Thornburg, G. H., Evansville 


29 


Shade and ornamentals 


4 


Twin Cedar Nursery, New Salisbury, R. R. 


1 25 


General nursery stock 


¥4. 


Vincennes Nursery, Vincennes 


127 


General nursery stock 


100 


Vore, G. W., Peru, R. R. 8 


167 


Strawberry plants 


1 


Wade, Morris, Borden. R. R. 1 


171 


Small fruits 


VA 


Walton, Martin, Borden 


21 


Strawberry plants 


3 


Washington Nursery, Washington 


147 


General nursery stock 


3 


Waters, J. W., Fairmount, R. R. 2 


a52 


General nursery stock 


"M 


Weilbrenner, Carl, Mount Vernon 


179 


General nursery stock 


2 


Whicker, Otto, Amo 


44 


General nursery stock 


1 


White, Harry, North Manchester 


79 


Ornamentals 


y^ 


WUkinson, J. F., Rockport 


37 


Nut trees 


1 


Williamson, E. B., Goshen, R. R. 1 


160 


Small fruits 


V/2 


Wilson's Nursery, Elnora 


187 


Small fruits 


3 


Wright Brothers, Borden, R. R. 1 


178 


Strawberry plants 


3 



IMPORT INSPECTION 

While inspecting some seedling stock shipi ed from France last 
spring, to one of the Indiana nurserymen, the inspectors found eleven 
brown tail moth nests. This was probably the most seriously infested 
shipment which had come into the United States during the past four 
or five years. We notified the Federal Horticultural Board and they 
soon issued some drastic orders to the foreign growers in regard to 
the condition of the stock coming into this country. The finding of 
this infestation on seedlings taught us that we can never release our 
vigilance in regard to the inspection of all foreign stock; for, should one 
of these infestations ever break out in the state the cost of eradicating 
it would be many times the expense of the inspection for all the years 
this office has been in existence. 

It seems that the American grown seedling stock is not so good 
for budding or grafting as that grown in Europe. While some seed- 
lings have been grown in this country they have not been produced in 
anyways near sufficient quantities. The nurserymen are willing to pay 
more for the foreign stock because it will produce a higher percentage 
of good trees. They claim that foreign stock buds and grafts more 
readily than the American grown seedlings. Until we are able to grow 
better stock in the United States, and in larger quantities, it will be 
necessary to import this seedling stock io that the nurseries can propa- 
gate fruit trees in sufficient quantitiet^^ to meet the demand of the fruit 
growers and the farmers. 



Department of •Conservation 249 

greenhouse inspection in indiana 
Harry F. Dietz 

Indiana ranks seventh among the commercial flower growing states 
of the Union. It is surpassed in this industry by New York, Pennsyl- 
vania, New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts and Ohio. Outbreaks of 
serious greenhouse insects, especially in the large flower growing states, 
have from time to time turned the attention of entomologists as a 
whole to the problems of the florists. Some interest has also been 
aroused among the state nursery inspectors regarding the inspection 
and certification of plants grown under glass as a means of checking 
the spread of dangerous insects and plant diseases. However, in looking 
over the nursery inspection laws of the several states, I find that in the 
laws of only two states, namely California and Texas, is the inspection 
of greenhouse plants mentioned specifically. On the other hand a number 
of states, namely Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New York, Oregon, 
Utah, Washington and the Dominion of Canada have what is known 
as terminal inspection. In states having terminal inspection all plants 
coming in from other states, irrespective of whether they bear certifi- 
cates of inspection of the state from which they came, are inspected at 
certain specified places or at their destination. 

At the present time there is no uniformity in the laws of the 
several states regarding the inspection and certification of greenhouse 
stock. As a result there is nothing in the laws of most states that will 
protect the buyer of plants grown under glass from receiving stock in- 
fested with injurious insects or plant diseases, except the contract he 
may have with the man from whom he is buying. Ultimately, more or 
less uniform inspection of greenhouse grown stock vdll come to pass 
throughout the country. All the large growers and distributors of 
greenhouse plants in Indiana want their stock inspected for a two- 
fold reason (1) the inspection certificate serves as a mark of the quality 
of their plants especially as regards freedom from new or injurious 
insects or diseases, (2) problems of insect and disease control are dis- 
cussed with the inspector and the grower is thus kept in touch with the 
most recent and practical methods. The percentage of florists holding 
inspection certificates in Indiana is small and most of the inspection 
work that has been done during the past year has been for the purpose 
of determining what insects and diseases are causing the most trouble 
in the state and advising the most effective methods of control. 

Seventy-six greenhouses have been visited and inspected during the 
past year. _Whitefly was found in thirty- two greenhouses, red spider 
was generally present, though in only twelve cases was it proving to be 
a serious pest. Greenhouse leaf-tyer was abundant in certain localities 
notably in the northeast and southwest corners of the state. This pest 
was also abundant in a few greenhouses in Indianapolis. Chrysanthemum 
midge was found in fifteen greenhouses though in most cases the infesta- 
tion was light. Rose midge occurred in eight greenhouses. Strawberry 
root worm was found at five places. Mealy bugs, though very common 
throughout the greenhouses of the state, were found to be a really seri- 
ous pest in only fifteen places. Another insect closely related to the 
mealy bugs, known as the greenhouse orthezia, has been found in three 



250 Year Book 

greenhouses in Indianapolis and one at Logansport. Cyclamen mite has 
been found in twenty greenhouses scattered over the state and thrips 
has been observed in thirty-five different places. From the middle of 
September to the middle of October, 1921, a large number of calls were 
received from florists in Indianapolis regarding the invasion of their 
greenhouses by three pests from out-of-doors. These were the corn ear- 
worm, the cabbage looper and the yellow striped army worm. The 
first two mentioned pests have not previously been serious pests under 
glass in this state. 

Among the most common plant diseases found were the stem and 
branch rot and root rot of carnation. But in only four cases had either 
of these diseases become a serious problem. Snapdragon rust was a 
serious disease in all but a few places where this plant was grown. In 
six greenhouses the rose cane blight was causing considerable loss. Black 
spot has been a serious rose disease throughout the state. A severe 
infection of crown gall on Ophelia was found in one greenhouse. Botrytis, 
a fungus about which florists have heard little, is a serious disease in 
this state attacking geraniums, begonias, cinerarias and chrysanthemums. 
It has been observed causing serious losses in twelve different green- 
houses. 

It will be noted from foregoing figures that no insect pest or plant 
disease is found to be a serious problem in all greenhouses. This is to 
be expected because not all greenhouses grow the same kinds of plants 
and not all growers use the same control methods. Again a month 
makes a great difference in the status of a given pest or disease at a 
given place. 

A brief discussion of different insects and diseases which have 
proved serious in this state with the most practical control measures 
will not be out of place. 

The greenhouse whitefly needs no description. As for control, I 
have found that one large grower of pelaragoniums in the northern part 
of the state uses hydrocyanic acid gas and has no trouble with this 
pest. Another large grower of this plant in the southwestern part of 
Indiana uses nicotine oleate, one fluid ounce to two gallons of water with 
good effect. The chief thing to be borne in mind is to do the work 
carefully and thoroughly. Furthermore, an infestation of whitefly 
should never be allowed to become heavy before control measures are 
undertaken. 

Nicotine oleate is nothing more than nicotine soap and resembles 
some of the brown soft hand soaps on the market. It also resembles 
petroleum jelly. Nicotine oleate is prepared by mixing 1 % parts of com- 
mercial or technical oleic acid or "red oil" with 2^/^ parts of nico fume 
liquid. Being- a soap, difficulty is sometimes experienced in getting this 
preparation to mix with hard water. Therefore it is desirable to use 
nicotine oleate with soft water. 

Red spider can be and is being controlled by various growers by 
heavy syringing of the plants with water under -pressure. Other grow- 
ers use a weak salt solution for this pest, especially on carnations. But 
the use of salt solution has a serious objection, namely that it causes 
the iron work of the supports and benches and the heating pipes to 



Department op Conservation 251 

rust out prematurely. Nicotine oleate spray as recommended for the 
whitefly has also been used effectively. 

The greenhouse leaf-tyer is a translucent piale green caterpillar about 
three-fourths inch long when full grown. This caterpillar feeds entirely 
on the undersides of single leaves and the upper epidermis or skin of the 
leaf is left untouched. Often several leaves are webbed together, in v/hich 
case the upper surface is eaten and the lower epidermis is left intact. 
The moth or "miller" that lays the eggs from which the caterpillars 
hatch is about one-half inch long and about the same width when at rest. 
Its color is a rusty brown obscurely marked with black. These "millers" 
may often be seen darting in and out among infested plants during the 
daytime or fluttering about in numbers near the glass at dusk. Killing 
these "millers" with fly swatters and trap lights is of some value as a 
control but keeping plants subject to attack sprayed with arsenate of 
lead at the rate of one ounce to one gallon of water to which one ounce of 
cheap laundry or fish oil soap has been added is the most practical con- 
trol measure. This method of control has been used on chrysanthemums, 
sweet peas, cinerarias, primulas, feverfew, marguerite daisies, geraniums, 
pelargonium and salvia. One important thing to remember in the control 
of this insect is that the spray must be put on the under sides of the 
leaves. This can be accomplished by the use of an angle nozzle on the 
spray pump. 

Most Indiana florists have become acquainted with the chrysanthe- 
mum midge, or gall fly, and through the efforts of the Division of Ento- 
mology have learned to recognize this pest. A number of infestations 
of greenhouses free from this insect have been avoided because the grow- 
ers have recognized the characteristic galls on the leaves of plants they 
had bought and have discarded or returned the infested stock. The con- 
trol of this pest is now quite simple and consists of spraying the plants 
with Black Leaf 40, one part to five hundred parts of water, and fish 
oil soap one ounce per gallon of water or nicotine oleate one fluid ounce 
to two gallons of water. Spraying should begin from six to eight weeks 
before cuttings are to be made and the spraying should be done twice a 
week. 

Previous to 1920 only three infestations of the strawberry root worm 
were found in Indiana. This year two new infestations have been found, 
both of which were unquestionably the result of the shipment of infested 
plants into Indiana from the east. It will pay Indiana rose growers to 
be on the alert and watch for this pest. The adult is a "hard shelled" 
beetle about one-sixth inch long and oval in shape. It varies in color 
from shiny black to chestnut-brown with four black spots. These beetles 
are shy insects and during the daytime they hide among the leaves, or 
in developing buds. They feed largely at night or on cloudy days chew- 
ing small chain-like holes through the young leaves or chewing the bark 
off of the new shoots. No simple effective control for this pest has as 
yet been found. Arsenical sprays or dusts have not been successful 
because the adults feed only on the youngest growth and refuse to eat 
any foliage that has been treated. Handpicking the adults in the late 
afternoon and early morning has given fair control in three greenhouses. 
The season at which this can best be done is just as the plants are break- 



252 Year Book 

ing into growth after their summer resting period. The removal of ail 
the soil from the benches of infested greenhouses during the summer 
resting period is the most certain, but at the same time most drastic 
control. In this case the walks must be treated with a strong contact 
insecticide such as kerosene emulsion. The removal of from two to 
three inches of the top soil from the benches of infested houses during 
the summer resting period of the plants has helped to materially reduce 
infestations. This is due to the fact that the larvae of this insect are 
removed with such soil. This treatment must be coupled with hand- 
picking in order to prevent the reinfestation of the new soil put around 
the plants. 

Practically every rose grower in Indiana who has grown the variety 
Ophelia has had trouble with rose midge. This pest has forced several 
growers in this state to discontinue the growing of roses. Other growers 
following the control measures given below have been able to hold this 
pest in check and in a number of instances to eradicate it from their 
houses. Though this insect has been known since 1887 its outbreaks in 
this country have been more or less sporadic and its spread has taken 
place through the distribution of favorite food plants, like Ophelia. 
There are on the market today a number of varieties of Ophelia par- 
entage that show the same susceptibility to the attacks of this insect 
so that it will pay Indiana rose growers to be careful where they buy 
plants and not introduce midge into clean houses. The control of this 
pest is nightly fumigation with nicotine papers or tobacco stems over 
a period of two to three weeks and keeping the benches covered with 
one-fourth to one-half inch of tobacco dust during the period of fumiga- 
tion. The walks and the soil beneath benches must be sprayed with a 
strong contact insecticide like kerosene emulsion. The dust must be 
renewed as it becomes wet. If tobacco stems are used for fumigation 
the florist must be sure that all the nicotine has not been leached out. 
Another point to be borne in mind is that no deviation from the control 
recommended will do. Fumigating every other night or two times a 
week will not give results because it allows adults to emerge and lay 
eggs on the nights that fumigation is omitted. The omission of the 
use of tobacco dust entirely or from certain benches in an infested house 
allows many maggots to enter the ground and complete their develop- 
ment, thus drawing out the time fumigation must be carried on. Daily 
picking of infested shoots and buds and burning them is a big help in 
reducing an infestation, but will not in itself control this pest. 

In the control of mealy bugs, and the greenhouse orthezia, nicotine 
oleate, one fluid ounce to two gallons of water, is a good control. The 
greenhouse orthezia differs from the mealy bugs in that the white waxy 
covering is brittle instead of soft and sticks out around the margin of 
the body in beautiful design and is especially long at the posterior end. 
The center of the body ' is an olive green. The legs are much longer 
than those of the mealy bugs. This insect is a serious pest of coleus, 
verbena and acalypha. 

During the last two weeks of September and the first two weeks 
of October some out-of-door insects invaded greenhouses and caused con- 
siderable damage. The insects were the cabbage looper, the corn ear- 



Department of Conservation 253 

worm and the yellow striped army worm. These are all caterpillars. 
The cabbage looper is a pale green "measuring worm" about one inch 
long. It has done considerable damage to the foliage of chrysanthemum 
and calendulas. The corn ear-worm found in greenhouses have varied 
in size from one-sixteenth of an inch to one and one-half inches long. 
As they grow larger and shed their skins several times the color begins 
to vary from reddish brown to green and the markings vary from very 
prominent stripes of brown, black and green to very indistinct ones. 
Likewise the prominence of the hairs varies in different individuals. 
These caterpillars show a decided preference for the buds and flowers 
of plants and the chief damage done in the greenhouse has been to the 
buds of chrysanthemum, rose and carnation and to geranium stock plants. 
In certain varieties of mums from 40 to 90 per cent of the buds that 
had been "taken" were destroyed by the newly hatched caterpillars be- 
fore the insects were discovered. On roses 10 to 15 per cent of the buds 
were injured, the injury resembling that of the rose bud-moth. On 
carnations about 15 to 25 per cent of the buds have been found dam- 
aged mostly by the larger caterpillars. The crowns of the plants were 
badly damaged in some cases. On geranium stock plants the stalks 
were tunnelled and the plants ruined. This injury took place largely 
in the field. 

The yellow striped army worm is a caterpillar one and one-half 
inches long when full grown. The color pattern is of two sorts, one is 
velvety black above and reddish brown beneath with two prominent and 
many fine bright yellow lines on the side. The other is a reddish gray 
with the back marked with a pair of triangular black spots on each 
segment. The lateral markings are indistinct. The chief damage of 
this caterpillar has been to carnations and pansies in cold frames. The 
damage is typical of that of a cutworm and all florists to whom I have 
talked have referred to this caterpillar as a cutworm. Both the corn 
ear- worm and the yellow striped army worm. belong to the cutworm 
moth family. 

For the control of the cabbage looper and the corn ear-worm spray^ 
ing the plants with arsenate of lead, one ounce; cheap laundry or fish 
oil soap, one ounce, and water, one gallon, is recommended. However, 
a number of florists object to the white deposit left by this spray, espe- 
cially on early flowering varieties. In this case arsenate of lead, one 
part, and cheap flour, one part, can be dusted on the plants. The dust 
can be syringed off the plants at will. In either case special attention 
should be given to get the buds thoroughly sprayed or dusted. Hand- 
picking, especially on small beds, will be beneficial. The same control 
can be used on the yellow striped army worm, especially where this 
insect occurs along with the other two. However, where the yellow 
striped army worm occurs alone handpicking in the very late afternoon 
may be done or poisoned bran mash may be used. This mash is made 
as follows: 

Bran 5 pounds 

Paris green % pound 

Cheap molasses 1 pint 

Lemon 1 fruit 

Water % gallon 



254 Year Book 

The dry bran and paris green are thoroughly mixed together in a 
tub or large bucket. The lemon juice is squeezed into the water, the 
pulp and peel of the fruit is finely chopped and mixed with the bran, 
the molasses is added to the water and the bran is moistened with this 
water just enough so that it is not sloppy. A small quantity of this 
bait is placed among the infested plants in the late afternoon and the 
worms will feed on it in preference to the plants. 

The cyclamen mite is a comparatively new pest in this state but 
a very serious one. Its chief injury has been to cyclamen, geraniums, 
stevia and Chatelaine begonias. This injury consists in a malforma- 
tion and dwarfing of the injured parts of the plants. The pest is not 
an insect but like the red spider is a mite and therefore belongs to the 
spider family. As a control, nicotine oleate and tobacco dust have given 
fair success. 

Thrips, though not a dreaded pest by the florist, have been the 
cause of considerable losses to the growers of cyclamen and in some 
cases the damage to these plants credited to the cyclamen mite by the 
grower was actually caused by thrips. The use of nicotine sprays or 
fumigation with tobacco papers are the best control for these insects. 

On the whole far less is known about the diseases of greenhouse 
plants than about greenhouse insects. Cultural practices probably play 
a more important role in control of plant diseases than in the control 
of insects. Yet when a disease becomes established it can rarely be 
controlled by cultural practices such as watering, ventilation and heat 
alone. 

. In the case of carnation root rot and stem and branch rot the use 
of sterilized soil in the benches will keep the disease in check provided 
the plants have not become infected in the field. In order to reduce the 
chances for field infection to a minimum it is not a wise practice to 
grow plants in the same location year after year, and in fields where any 
great number of plants show infection planting should be discontinued 
for at least five years. 

Snapdragon rust can best be controlled by growing plants from 
seed and then planting these seedlings in houses where snapdragons 
have not previously been grown. One thing that many florists do not 
comprehend about this disease is that cuttings from infested plants 
will yield only plants that will sooner or later become rusted. In a 
number of cases I have found that seedlings planted in houses where 
previously heavily rusted plants had been grown also contracted the 
disease probably because the spores had carried over on the benches, 
on the glass, or on the walls of the houses. 

Rose cane blight is caused by the same fungus that causes the cane 
blight on raspberry. This disease causes a die back of the wood and 
often follows in after a flower has been cut off or a plant has been 
pruned. Many florists think it is a natural result of pruning until a 
whole plant is killed. The only control is the vigorous cutting out and 
burning of the diseased wood at least three or four inches below the 
point where the disease is visible. The sterilization of the pruning 
shears with formaldehyde after each cut is important. Under no con- 



Department of Conservation 265 

ditions should dead wood be cut from a plant and the same shears be 
used to trim healthy plants before these tools have been sterilized. This 
is the w^ay that the disease is often spread, especially when the plants 
are being cut back for the summer resting period. Spraying infested 
plants with Bordeaux mixture often keeps this disease from spreading. 

Black spot is the most prevalent and troublesome rose disease in 
Indiana greenhouses. Whenever growing roses receive a check this 
disease usually develops and once it gets a start is very hard to con- 
trol. Spraying the plants with Bordeaux mixture or commercial lime- 
sulphur solution, one gallon to fifty gallons of water, is the best spray 
to use. Dusting the plants with finely divided sulphur, ninety parts, 
and arsenate of lead, ten parts, has been recommended. Collecting and 
burning the characteristically spotted leaves that have fallen from the 
plants is a big help in the control. Keeping the plants moderately dry 
is also desirable, but care must be taken not to dry them too much. 

Crown gall is a warty knot at the crown of the plant. It is a serious 
disease of apple and red raspberry nursery stock although its attacks 
are by no means confined to these two hosts. Recent observations indi- 
cate that certain varieties of roses, particularly Ophelia, are very sus- 
ceptible to this disease. While it does not kill the plants outright the 
galls, especially when they are large ones, seriously interfere with the 
normal flow of sap so that the plants neither grow nor flower as they 
should. In other words, the plants are always "checked." There is no 
control for this trouble except discarding all plants that are infected. 

Botrytis is a serious disease that does a lot of damage which the 
florist blames on a lack of ventilation, etc. It causes a rotting of the 
leaves and flowers of geraniums, begonias, cinerarias and chrysanthe- 
mums when the plants are crowded together. The dead areas soon 
become covered with a fuzzy grey mould which is just one mass of 
spores which help spread the disease. Plenty of ventilation and spraying 
with Bordeaux mixture or ammoniacal copper carbonate will hold this 
disease in check. Ammoniacal copper carbonate has the advantage that 
it leaves no deposit on the foliage and is prepared as follows: 

Copper carbonate 5 ounces 

Ammonia (26° Baume) 3 pints 

Water 50 gallons 

The time has come in the florist business when the grower must 
give as much attention to the insects and diseases that attack his plants 
as to the culture of his crop. The reason for this is that as a country 
grows older its insect pests and plant diseases increase. New pests are 
brought in through commerce and native pests often assume new roles. 
I cannot think of a plant that is entirely free from the attacks of some 
insect pest or plant disease. Therefore, it behooves the grower of plants 
under glass to keep his eyes open and when he sees his plants injured 
or dying to find out what is injuring them or causing them to die. Blam- 
ing the culture given the plants is not enough, although this may be a 
factor. Eternal vigilance and the prompt use of the spray pump is the 
price of success in the greenhouse as well as on the farm and in the 
orchard. 



256 Year Book 



CHINCH BUGS 



The chinch bug situation appears serious for 1922. In a few counties 
the first brood caused some damage this year but it was not excessive. 
The second brood damaged the brace roots on the corn and it lodged 
badly and made wheat sowing a heavy task. This second brood appar- 
ently was free from disease and it is this disease that usually holds the 
chinch bugs in check. They are going into winter quarters in greater 
numbers than they have in many years and unless we have weather which 
will kill them we will have hordes of these pests in our wheat fields next 
year. 

This winter fence rows and ditch banks should be burned over so as 
to destroy the places where they hibernate. Corn which is shocked in 
fields sown to wheat should be fed to stock before spring opens. The 
farmers will have no trouble in seeing these bugs, if there are any, by 
moving a few of the shocks. 

The wheat fields should be examined before harvest time so that the 
farmers can be prepared to fight the pests after -the wheat is harvested. 
When the bugs are in the wheat there is only one way to keep them 
out of the corn fields and that is by placing a barrier between the wheat 
and the corn. This can be done either with creosote oil or crude oil. 
If creosote oil is used it must be on hand in time to lay the barrier 
before the hugs get to the corn. Creosote oil usually must be shipped 
and you must see that some dealer in your community handles it or 
you must send away and get it in time. Crude oil makes an excellent 
barrier if poured on straw. The straw should be laid out in a strip 
about three or four inches wide and about two inches high and the 
oil poured on this. As long as the oil stays fresh on the straw the 
chinch bugs cannot cross it. This method gave excellent results in 
Indiana this year. 

TAKE-ALL 

In 1919 a quarantine was placed upon some farms in Porter, La- 
Porte and Tippecanoe counties, on account of the appearance of a dis- 
ease in the wheat fields which at that time was thought to be Australian 
Take-All. This quarantine prohibited the growing of all small grains 
for a period of five years on those fields where the disease was present. 
This fall we were able to secure a modification of the quarantine sc as 
to permit the sowing of certain varieties of wheat in the quarantined area. 
The government had a list of thirty-nine varieties which are supposed 
to be resistant to this disease and as this list contains some of the best- 
known varieties of wheat for the state it will cause no hardship for 
the growers to be limited to this list in their wheat planting. As a 
matter of fact it would be advisable if the wheat growers in that entire 
section would sow only the varieties which are listed in this, with the 
exception of "Red Wave." This should not have been mentioned in this 
list as it is not a variety of wheat which can be used by the millers 
and it should not be grown in Indiana. The varieties in this list which 
are the most valuable for northern Indiana are being studied by the 
experiment station at Purdue University, and I should like to recommend 
that all farmers, and especially those in the communities where the 
Take-All disease was found, limit their sowings to varieties in this 



Department of Conservation 257 

list and that they consult their county agent in regard to the best of 
the listed varieties for their neighborhood. Kanred is a variety which 
has received much favorable comment and this may be one of the best 
for our use. 

I am publishing the letter I received from Mr. W. A. Orton, acting 
chairman of the Federal Horticultural Board, so as to show the author- 
ity under which the Conservation Commission lifted the quarantine which 
it placed on the fields infested with Take-All in 1919. We agreed at 
that time to place local quarantines on this ground for five years if the 
Federal Horticultural Board would not issue a state-wide quarantine on 
our small grains. In December, 1920, the Federal Horticultural Board 
gave me permission to permit farmers to sow oats and rye on this 
quarantined area so that they could rotate their crops. Now, with the 
permission to sow wheat, the quarantine is lifted except that the farms 
in the quarantined area are limited to the list of varieties which the Fed- 
eral Horticultural Board has specified. From time to time I presume 
the Board will add to this list of varieties as rapidly as it finds others 
that are resistant to the disease. 

"UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FEDERAL HORTICULTURAL BOARD 

Washington, D. C, August 25, 1921. 
Mr. Frank N. Wallace, 
State Entomologist, 

The Department of Conservation, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Dear Mr. Wallace: 

Your letter of August 12, regarding the modification of the Indiana quarantine 
on account of the take-all disease, has been received and referred to the Bureau of Plant 
Industry for consideration. 

It appears from the records of the experimental work of the Bureau of Plant In- 
dustry that a considerable number of wheat varieties are recognized as highly resistant 
or perhaps immune to take-all, and accordingly there appears to be no objection to 
modifying the quarantine, permitting the planting in the quarantined area of wheat 
of any of the following varieties : 

Bologline Hungarian Poole 

Dietz Longberry Kanred Portage 

Fultz Malakof Red Rock 

Gold Coin Michigan Amber Rudy 

Harvest King Pesterboden Trumbull 

Jones Fife Currell Pride of Indiana 

Leap Fulcaster Red Wave 

Mediterranean Gladden Stoner (Marvelous) 

Nigger Harvest Queen Turkey 

Crimean Indiana Swamp Red Cross (red-chaflfed) 

Early May Kharkof Reliable 

Gipsy Mammoth Red Super (Burbank's) 

Grandprize Minnesota Reliable Wheedling 

In view of this evidence submitted by the Bureau of Plant Industry, the Board 
would suggest the modification of your quarantine by extending permission to plant 
wheat of these varieties rather than to withdraw the quarantine entirely. Since the 
number of varieties that are resistant is rather extensive, and there seems to be no 
especial hardship in maintaining this restriction, I presume that this will furnish 
sufficient leniency to avoid serious trouble in continuing the quarantine against unknown 
types of wheat. Very truly yours. 

(Signed) W. A. ORTON. 
Actins Chairman, Federal Horticultural Board." 
17—19980 



258 Year Book 

The Federal Horticultural Board was well pleased with the manner 
in which Indiana handled the Take- All situation and I do not believe 
that Indiana need ever fear of having a state-wide quarantine placed 
as long as the state is willing and able to handle an emergency in the 
manner the Take-All situation was handled in Indiana. 

EUROPEAN CORN BORER 

The European Corn Borer, Pyrausta nubilalis, has attracted wide- 
spread attention. Last year I reported that territory was found infested 
in southern Canada along the shores of Lake Erie. This year the gov- 
ernment and state inspectors discovered a light infestation scattered 
along the southern shore of Lake Erie and in September a few of the 
corn borer larva were found in the southwestern part of Michigan along 
the lake shore. The Federal Horticultural Board called a hearing in 
Washington, when this new territory was discovered, to consider the 
advisability of placing a regional quarantine which would take in a large 
group of the northeastern states. The idea was to prohibit the shipment 
of corn and any other grains or vegetables which might be carriers of 
the pest out of the quarantined territory, with the hope of confining the 
corn borer within the states which were quarantined. Indiana was 
listed as one of the states which might be so quarantined. In the gov- 
ernment reports it was stated that the corn borer was within six miles 
of the Indiana line and for that reason Indiana received notice that a 
representative should appear at the hearing. We were able to show 
the authorities at Washington that it was an error on their part when 
they stated the corn borer was within six miles of the Indiana line. It 
was at least sixty miles away from the state line and at the hearing 
the board took under advisement the question as to how the quarantine 
should be handled but stated definitely that Indiana would not be in- 
cluded in the quarantined area. It was the consensus of opinion of 
those present at the hearing that a large quarantined area would not 
accomplish the best results in the control of this pest. The Federal 
Horticultural Board had been able, with the local quarantines which 
are at present in force, to prevent any widespread distribution of this 
pest and it seemed advisable to continue the quarantine along these 
lines until such time as the government and the states, working in co- 
operation, could study methods of control and possibly introduce parasites 
to partially control this pest. There is no doubt but what this will be a 
serious pest in the corn growing states and every year that it can be 
delayed in reaching the corn belt will be of great advantage. It appears 
that the natural spread of this insect is approximately five miles per 
year. If the Ohio infestation can be held to this natural spread it will 
be several years before it gets over the water shed in Ohio so that the 
insect could be spread by the streams. There is no doubt that during 
flood time this insect would be carried long distances in corn stalks in 
flooded streams and it will be impossible to prevent the spread of this 
pest over in the Ohio valley when once a serious infestation becomes 
established along the streams which flow into the Ohio river. 

At the hearing in Washington the delegates of the states repre- 
sented met and commended the Federal Horticultural Board for the 



Department of Conservation 259 

efficient manner in which the work of controlling the European Corn 
Borer had been handled and unanimously adopted the following resolu- 
tions : 

Resolved: That this conference, after due consideration, 
affirms its belief that federal quarantine measures for prevent- 
ing spread of the European Corn Borer should be continued 
substantially as in the past season, on the basis of holding the 
pest as closely as possible to the area actually known to be 
infested. 

The following resolution was proposed and was adopted unani- 
mously : 

Resolved: That Congress be asked for the sum of $275,000 
for the purpose of carrying out the above program for the 
current fiscal year. 

I sincerely hope that the appropriation bill in Congress will carry 
this item in full. It would be folly to expect a lower appropriation to 
carry on this work when the infested area is increasing each year. 

Many citizens imagined that the European Corn Borer was pres- 
ent in Indiana this year. It has never been found in the state. The 
Corn Ear Worm was mistaken for the Corn Borer as the Corn Ear 
Worm was very destructive this year, due to its having three broods 
whereas in most years it has been limited to two broods. The Corn 
Ear Worm is described in a separate paragraph in this report. 

CORN EAR WORM 

The corn ear worm is one of our native insects which has been 
principally a pest of corn in this state in former years. It is true that 
it has attacked other crops but at least 90 per cent of its damage has 
been done to corn in previous years. It has been here so long and 
the damage so constant that it has been accepted by farmers and gar- 
deners as one of the conditions to be expected. But the year 1921 was 
different from other years. The damage from the corn ear worm was 
so excessive that it is not easy to figure the amount of loss to the crops 
but in Indiana alone it will run into millions of dollars from this one 
pest. 

A study of the life history of this pest will enable us to see why 
this damage became so serious this year. Normally there are two broods 
of the insect in this state. The insect winters as a pupa in the soil 
and emerges in the spring and lays its eggs. Each female lays on an 
average of six hundred eggs. There are not many parasites of this 
pest and a large number of the larvae mature. The second generation 
is much more numerous than the first and naturally does much more 
damage. This second generation is the one that the housewife finds 
in the sugar corn and it also does the damage that farmers notice in the 
field corn. This year, however, the warm period early in the spring 
caused the moths to emerge much sooner than usual and the first gen- 
eration came along four or five weeks ahead of the growing season for 
com. The farmers could not plant corn any earlier this year and in fact 
it was planted a little later than it is commonly planted. The second 



260 Year Book 

generation of the corn ear worm developed a little later than the first 
brood comes, in normal seasons, but about two hundred times as numer- 
ous. We expected that this would be all, but we found that this brood 
seemed to hasten its development and instead of wintering over as pupae, 
as is normal with the pest, they emerged and a full third brood of the 
worms came in time for most of them to work on the field corn and 
late sweet corn. I believe it would be safe to estimate that there were 
several hundred times as many of these larvae as we have ever had 
before and they attacked not only corn but almost all crops. We found 
them feeding on weeds where there were no field crops. They also en- 
tered most of the greenhouses of the state and in many instances de- 
stroyed 30 to 50 per cent of the chrysanthemum and carnation buds 
before the owners discovered that they had a new pest to combat. They 
did control them, as it is possible to do this in any intensively cultivated 
area. However, it is not practical to do this with the corn crop and the 
farmers had to suffer. The worms eating in the ears of corn will cause 
much of it to mould and the elevators will be unable to secure much 
No. 2 com. 

Just what result this enormous brood will have on next season's crop 
will be impossible to foretell. It seems that nature always sets up a 
balance somehow and we may not have any more trouble next season 
than we have had in years previous to 1921. 

HOUSEHOLD INSECTS 

From the number of inquiries coming into the office in regard to 
the control of household pests I am often inclined to believe that these 
insect enemies are becoming more numerous. The fleas and the cock- 
roaches seem to be about equally divided in regard to the number of calls 
for assistance. However, the plea for help from the flea-infested house 
is much more urgent than in regard to the roaches. The person who 
has never seen a severe infestation of fleas in a dwelling cannot realize 
how serious such a pest can become, and usually one infestation is 
enough for people to realize that cats and dogs must be kept free from 
fleas or kept out of the house. In every case which came to the atten- 
tion of the office this season we found either a cat or a dog to be respon- 
sible for the trouble. 

The adult fleas live on the animals and the eggs are usually laid 
on the animals, loosely in the hair. These eggs drop to the floor, rugs, 
and bedding of the animals. The larvae hatch and live in the cracks of 
the floor, feeding on the dust which collects there. They also live in the 
nap of the rugs or in the bedding of the animals. In fact, the bedding 
of an infested animal often becomes a mass of wiggling larvae which 
are frequently mistaken for fly larvae or "maggots." When the larvae 
become full grown they form a pupae from which the mature flea 
emerges. These adult fleas must have a meal of blood from some ani- 
mal before they can lay eggs and quite often a human furnishes that 
meal of blood. 

When fleas are found in a house get the cat or dog outside and 
keep them out. Then mop the floors with a five per cent solution of 
one of the Cresol preparations which can be bought at any drug store. 
The rugs should be cleaned with a vacuum cleaner or taken out and 



Department op Conservation 261 

beaten. The vacuum cleaner should be run over all the floors as this 
will pick up many adult fleas as well as the larvae and eggs. Many 
cellars become infested, when the animals are allowed to use the base- 
ments, and these should be mopped or sprayed with the Cresol solution. 

If the house could be closed for twenty-four hours napthalene flakes 
can be used, at the rate of five pounds per room, scattered over the floors 
and this will kill adults and larvae but the odor is too strong for one to 
stay in the house while it is used. However, it is about the most effective 
method which can be applied and the odor soon leaves after the naptha- 
lene flakes are cleaned out of the house. 

Dogs may be freed of fleas by bathing them in a three per cent 
solution of some Cresol preparation. To make such a solution add four 
tablespoonfuls of the preparation to a gallon of water. It is usually not 
advisable to bathe cats. These animals should be dusted with pyrethrum 
powder. This powder when fresh will kill some of the fleas and stupefy 
the rest so that they fall from the animals. The animals should be 
dusted over a newspaper which should be burned after the fleas have 
fallen from their host. 

Cockroaches, in flats, are becoming very common and they cannot 
be exterminated unless all the tenants make an effort to clean up. 
Sodium fluorid dusted around all the cracks which the roaches can use 
acts as a repellant and is also a poison. However, these pests breed in 
the basement and keep coming up along the pipes into the apartments 
so that the sodium fluorid must be constantly used. 

Clothes moths, the buffalo moths, and carpet beetles are becoming 
very common and cause much damage to wool and silk garments. There 
are many repellants but most of these only serve to keep the adult 
moths and beetles away from the garments. If the eggs are on the 
garments the larvae can still live and eat holes even though such chem- 
icals as moth balls and napthalene flakes are used as repellants. Where 
the larvae are present it is advisable to fumigate with carbon-bisul- 
phide, using one pound of the liquid to one hundred cubic feet of space. 
It must be used in a tight box or closet so that the fumes are confined 
for at least twenty-four hours. The temperature should not fall below 
seventy degrees Fahrenheit during the period of fumigation. Lights 
or fires must not be near the gas as it is very inflammable. 

Bedbugs have been a source of considerable annoyance to house- 
wives in Indianapolis. The most practical control for these insects is 
gasoline. The seams and buttons on the mattresses should be care- 
fully treated and all cracks and crevices of the bedstead should be 
flooded with this substance. Several cases were brought to the atten- 
tion of this office where this pest had gotten into cracks of the floor, be- 
neath the baseboards, behind the door casings and around the moldings. 
Under such conditions flooding these hiding places with gasoline, at 
intervals of a week, will get rid of the infestation after the second or 
third application. 

Numerous calls have been received during the past summer for aid 
in eradicating ants from houses. Several species of ants are involved, 
the most common being the garden or corn field ant, and the little red ant. 
Both of these ants will take poisoned syrups and can be controlled by the 
following mixture: 



262 Year Book 

Tartar emetic 1 part 

Sugar 10 parts 

Water 100 parts 

The svigar and water should be boiled together to make a syrup and 
the tartar emetic then added. A small quantity of the mixture should 
be placed in a shallow dish so that the ants can get it. Placing a piece 
of sponge in the dish so that it will come in contact with the side allows 
the ants more easy access to the liquid. The dish should be set in loca- 
tions where the ants are most abundant in order that they can find it 
readily. It should be remembered that tartar emetic is a poison and 
children and domestic animals must not be allowed access to it. 

To keep ants off of tables, or out of ice boxes or kitchen cabinets, 
place the casters or legs of such furniture in a small container filled with 
water which has been covered with a film of kerosene or light machine 
oil. The furniture thus protected must not be allowed to come into 
contact with the wall or unprotected furniture. 

In the case of the garden ant the insect can often be traced to its 
nest out-of-doors. This nest can then be destroyed by taking a sharp 
stick and driving it into the nest at several places and as it is withdrawn 
pouring into the holes either hot water or a small quantity of carbon 
bisulphide. Where carbon bisulphide is used the holes should be plugged 
up with moist earth or the nest covered with wet burlap. Since carbon 
bisulphide is inflammable lights and flames of all kinds must be kept 
away from it. 

APIARY INSPECTION 

The season of 1921 has been the most successful for the apiary 
inspection work since this office has been in existence. More apiaries 
were inspected, more county beekeepers' tours were held, and more 
demonstration meetings were attended than in any previous season. 
When the year's work was tabulated it showed that less foulbrood was 
present in the state than last year in spite of the fact that the adverse 
weather conditions last spring were most conducive to the spread of bee 
diseases. It is very gratifying to note that the bee diseases are gradually 
losing their hold in counties where it seemed impossible to stamp them 
out. We know now that it is possible to so nearly eradicate the dis- 
eases that they will cease to be a serious menace to successful beekeep- 
ing. Several years ago many of our best beekeepers said they did not 
believe it would ever be possible to control the bee diseases so that 
beekeeping would continue to be a profitable vocation. We believe that 
the past four years' inspection service has demonstrated that it is prac- 
ticable to clean a territory of foulbrood and to keep it clean. 

During the coming season it will be possible for us to assign an 
inspector to a limited territory and have him revisit the yards where 
foulbrood was previously found to see that it has been properly treated. 
This year in some of the counties we found less than two per cent 
of the colonies infected with foulbrood, while in these same counties four 
years ago the average infection was over twenty per cent. 

One of the most gratifying results of the apiary inspection work 
has been the improvement shown in the methods of beekeeping in the 
state. In former years we had only a few first-class beekeepers who 



Department of Conservation 263 

could produce a high quality of honey in large quantities; now we have 
hundreds. Many of these keep bees as a hobby or a side line to their 
regular work, but they are able to handle large yards and many of 
them are gradually expanding into the "big beekeeping class." It is 
most pleasing to see the high quality of Indiana honey for sale in many 
parts of the state and our citizens are discriminating enough to realize 
that honey produced here is equal in quality to any other and is supe- 
rior to most of the honey that is shipped into the state. Much of the 
credit for the high standard of beekeeping in Indiana is due to the 
efficiency of our inspection force. They are very capable and conscien- 
tious bee men and we are fortunate in being able to keep such men 
with us. 

To illustrate how the work has shown a progressive cleanup, the 
office records of a few counties were taken for the past four years. In 
Lake county in 1918 we inspected 775 colonies of bees. One hundred 
seventy-nine, or 23.09%, of these were diseased with American or Eu- 
ropean foulbrood. In 1919 we inspected 697 colonies and 99, or 14.1%, 
were found diseased. In 1920 the inspectors examined 958 colonies and 
41, or 4.27%, were diseased. This season the work was very thorough 
and 1,227 colonies were inspected and only 24, or 1.9%, were found dis- 
eased. Lake county beekeepers know that the brood diseases can be con- 
trolled although four years ago some of them were skeptical as to what 
the result would be. 

In Newton county in 1918 there were 677 colonies inspected with 
153, or 22.6%, diseased with foulbrood. In 1919, of the 663 colonies 
inspected 70, or 10.5%, were diseased. In 1920 there were 598 colonies 
inspected and 26, or 4.34%, were diseased. This season 619 colonies 
were inspected and only 18, or 2.8%, were found diseased. It is inter- 
esting to note the gradual lowering of the number of cases each year. 
We hope to be able to actually clean up all traces of diseases in these 
counties in 1922 and if the beekeepers are vigilant, and will watch to 
catch the first case of foulbrood that should appear, there will be no 
fear of the disease ever becoming the scourge that it was in the two 
counties above mentioned. The state, as a whole, is not so clean as the 
two counties cited but much of it is equally free from disease. It is 
interesting to note the results of the inspection over the entire state and 
to see the gradual decline in brood diseases over a period of four years. 

1918 14,431 colonies inspected, with 14.9% diseased 

1919 19,245 colonies inspected, with 9.6% diseased 

1920 18,454 colonies inspected, with 6.4% diseased 

1921 20,426 colonies inspected, with 4.6% diseased 

BEE INSPECTION RECORD FOR THE SEASON 1921 

Number of yards visited 2,230 

Nxunber of colonies inspected 20,426 

Number of dead colonies 652 

Number American foulbrood 895 

Niunber European foulbrood 155 

Paralysis 22 

Sac brood 34 

Box hives 864 

Cross combs 1,112 

Movable hives 18,450 

Niunber of counties visited this year 54 



264 Year Book 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

(Being the Twenty-first Indiana Forestry Report) 



CHAS. C. DEAM, State Forester. 

MARY E. BASSETT, Stenographer. 

L. E. DEAM, Supt. Clark County State Forest. 

Forestry in Indiana during the yast year has made substantial prog- 
ress but the imminent danger of a timber famine is not yet realized by 
the voters of the state. The timber supply of the United States is rap- 
idly disappearing. The United States to be independent of foreign 
countries for a timber supply should at once dedicate enough acres to 
growing timber to supply the need of the nation. Indiana should vol- 
unteer her quota, as she had always done in emergencies of the past. 
There are thousands of acres of abandoned cleared land and native 
forests on hilly land in southern Indiana that should everlastingly be 
in forest. The thousands of acres of abandoned land in the hill coun- 
try prove this statement. Just how many acres of Indiana should be 
devoted to timber growing is a matter of controversy, but that action 
should be taken at once to prevent the clearing of essentially forest 
land needs no debate. The essentially forest land of Indiana is owned 
in small parcels by individual owners who are not in a position to prac- 
tice forestry. Hence, it clearly becomes the duty of the state to pur- 
chase and manage the essentially forest land of the state. In so doing 
we would only be following what many other states are doing. 

In 1903 Indiana bought 2,000 acres of forest land at $8.00 per 
acre. No additional purchase was made until this year, when 337 acres 
bordering the first purchase were bought. The last legislature gener- 
ously increased the Governor's emergency fund for the purpose of buying 
additional forest land. In anticipation of such purchases a reconnoiter- 
ing survey was made which shows that thousands of acres can yet be 
bought for $8 to $10 per acre. The price of the land is rapidly advancing 
in the hill country because the individual owners find that they can clear 
the land and make a profit on it for a few years or until it washes 
or erodes until it is abandoned as farm land. It is urged that the state 
purchase as soon as possible our essentially forest land, because after 
it is once cleared and farmed until it is no longer valuable for farming, 
it will cost more than the land was originally worth to get it back into 
forest. 

Indiana need not and should not depend solely upon the hilly land 
for a timber supply. The greater part of the state is agricultural land, 
but it is believed that every farm of forty acres or more should have 
a woods the size of which may range as the value and topography of 
the land. A minimum of five to eight per cent of the total is sug- 
gested. The advantages of such a distribution of our forests need not 
be enumerated. 

Ordinarily the farmer's woods is at the rear of the farm where the 
returns are the growth of timber only, granting that timber land should 
not be pastured. The proper place for a woods is about the farm 
buildings or at least on the windward side, unless the topography of 



Department of Conservation 265 

the farm makes it advisable to locate it elsewhere. So located it is 
worth two or three times as much as if it were on the back end of the 
farm. When a woods is located about the dwellings the owner receives 
not only the timber growth, but a woods so located adds to the beauty 
of the farm, and protects the buildings, orchard and stock from the 
winds and storms. Even the housewife appreciates the difference be- 
tween a home located among trees and one exposed to dusty winds. A 
woods so located would afford the owner an opportunity to cut and 
haul his fuel wood at times which might otherwise be wasted. 

If the farmer's woods is not so located it is advised to plant a woods 
about his buildings. In so doing he plants only the kind of trees that 
have a high value, and his woods will be free from trees of low value 
and weed trees. For this reason a planted forest will be far more re- 
munerative than one that grows up like "Topsy." True the owner will 
not be able to reap much of a timber crop for many years, but in less 
than twenty-five years he will have an effective windbreak which is half 
of the value of a woodland. While he does not obtain timber value 
returns for several years, yet he is increasing the value of the farm 
by building up such a woodlot. The Division of Forestry is willing at 
all times to advise on such an undertaking, and plans in a few years to 
furnish at cost forest seedlings for such planting. 

Farm land in Indiana has been assessed for taxation on a basis of 
its commercial value. The commercial value of the land, except its loca- 
tion, is determined by the profits that may be derived from it if devoted 
to general farming. Woodland has been assessed at a value which is 
obtained by adding to its value for farm land if cleared, the value of the 
standing timber. As a consequence the taxes on forest land is equal 
or nearly so to that of cleared land. Now land owners and foresters 
know that the profit of forest land is not equal to that of good farm 
land. Hence land owners must clear their land to realize a profit on 
their woodland. Now most farmers consider their woodland an in- 
tegral part of their farm, and consider it as necessary to a farm as a 
barn lot or a yard about a home. Yet many land owners vociferously 
protesting have been compelled to clear or reduce the size of their wood- 
land. In many instances owners have "cleaned up" their woods to let 
the grass grow in it so that they could pasture it, which in a few years 
means the same thing as clearing it. 

Our last legislature made a study of this problem which resulted in 
the passage of a law which classifies woodland as forest land and as- 
sesses it at $1.00 per acre. It must not be understood that this law sub- 
sidizes the growing of timber. It is a law only that recognizes the true 
value of a forest crop. This law will be the means of saving thou- 
sands of acres of woodland, distributed in all parts of the state. It 
appeals especially to owners of woodland on high priced land and to non- 
resident woodland owners. The passage of the law is not generally 
known to woodland owners, and for this reason a brief synopsis of the 
law is herewith given in order that woodland owners may know the 
salient features so they may decide whether or not they wish to classify 
their woodland as forest land. 

The enacting clause and a brief synopsis are as follows: 



266 Year Book 

"An Act to encourage timber production and to protect water sheds 
by classifying certain lands as forest lands ; and prescribing a method of 
assessing lands thus classified for the purpose of taxation." 

Sec. 1. States that both native and planted woodlands may be classi- 
fied. 

Sec. 2. The minimum number of trees per acre for each class of 
forest land is prescribed. Briefly a planted forest is one which has been 
planted not farther than 8x8 feet apart, and has a good stand of trees 
remaining. A native forest must not contain open spaces. By open 
spaces is meant sky openings 8x8 feet, up through which a tree might 
grow. In the event that a woodland has such openings, nuts or seedlings 
m.ust be planted in them. If a woodland is classified that does not 
meet the requirements, the owner promises to have trees in the open 
spaces within three years, and he must make an effort to do so both the 
first and second year. 

Sec. 3. Native and planted forests shall be assessed at one dollar 
per acre. 

Sec. 4. Prescribes procedure for the classification of woodlands. 
The area must be surveyed by the county surveyor and his notes must be 
inked on the blank furnished by the State Forester. Then the area 
must be appraised by the township assessor. Next the blanks must be 
sent to the State Forester for his approval. Before he can do this 
he must personally visit the woodland to determine if the stand of trees 
complies with the law. After the State Forester approves the blank 
it is filed with the county recorder and the State Forester notifies the 
county auditor that the land has been duly classified and to place the 
same on the duplicate at one dollar per acre. 

Sec. 5. Prescribes that the surveyor can not charge more than the 
legal rate. 

Sec. 6. Prescribes that the land shall be appraised at its cash value, 
the timber on the land not being considered in the appraisement. 

Sec. 7. Prescribes that the expense of the survey shall be paid by 
the applicant, and the appraisement by the county. 

Sec. 8. Prescribes no area less than three acres can be classified. 

Sec. 9. Prescribes that the classified land shall contain no building. 

Sec. 10. Prescribes that the area can not be grazed. 

Sec. 11. Prescribes that the classification continues if the land is 
sold, etc. 

Sec. 12. Prescribes that the area shall be marked by four signs 
furnished by the Department of Conservation. 

Sec. 13. Prescribes that in the event that any mineral, oil, gas, 
stone or other mineral wealth the land may obtain is mined and sold the 
same shall be assessed. 

Sec. 14. The State Forester has the power to issue special permits 
for the management of such land. 

Sec. 15. It shall be the duty of the State Forester to duly inspect 
such land and make a report of such inspection with recommendations 
to the owner. 

Sec. 16. In the event the land is to be withdrawn from classification 
it is appraised in the same manner as it was when it was entered. 



Department of Conservation 267 

Sec. 17. Upon withdrawal the owner pays to the township, county 
and state pro rata the difference between the first and second appraise- 
ment if any. 

Sec. 18. If the State Forester finds that the owner does not carry 
out the provisions of the act, and refuses to do so, the State Forester 
can withdraw the land from classification. 

Sec. 19. The owner of classified land must make an annual report 
to the State Forester on a blank to be furnished by the State Fore>ster. 

It is to be noted that this law in no way interferes with the owner's 
management of his forest, except he can not graze it. He can cut timber 
when and as much as he pleases and any sizes he chooses. It is taken 
as an axiom in the management of an Indiana forest that you can cut 
when and as much as you choose, and the forest will renew itself if 
stock and fire are kept out of it. 

Every forest in Indiana that has never been grazed will easily 
classify as forest land. In fact most of the well wooded forests that 
have been grazed more or less will also comply with the law. It is 
remarkable how soon a woodland will become well stocked with trees 
when stock and fire are kept out. However when a woods is so open 
that grass grows in it, forest seed can not get a hold and a wood's pas- 
ture will continue until the sod is broken up. 

Persons who own prospective forest land should write the State 
Forester at once to inspect their woodland with a view of having it class- 
ified as forest land, and cease to pay the present rate of taxes, which is 
unjust for woodlands. 

THE CLARK COUNTY STATE FOREST 

The Clark County State Forest, formerly called the Forest Reserve, 
originally contained 2,000 acres, and is located about one mile north- 
west of Henryville. The purpose of the Forest Reserve was to ascertain 
by experiment the best species of forest trees to plant and how to man- 
age our native woodlands. This was the first and wise step in the 
process of state owned forests. 

The Clark County State Forest is bounded on the east end by a 
public road. On the north side it is bounded by a series of small farms 
which lie between it and an angling public road. These farms are from 
40 to, 160 rods in length. Four of the longer of these aggregating 337 
acres have been bought, which gives a much needed outlet to the deep 
hollows of the west end of the forest. Practically all of the land pur- 
chased contains a good stand of white and black oak, some of which are 
already tie size. 

During the summer of 1920 many of the scarlet and some of the 
black oak died in the southeast part of the forest. Early this spring it 
was decided to sell for ties all the dead trees from this area together with 
trees that did not give promise of growing into good timber. How- 
ever, before the sale could be made, which requires sixty days' notice 
in state papers, the railroad at the forest quit buying ties, so the trees 
still stand, awaiting the time when there will be a market for ties. 
As a preliminary to the sale Professor Burr N. Prentice with the assist- 
ance of students from the Purdue School of Forestry marked the trees 



268 Year Book 

for sale on about 150 acres, and the number of ties each tree would 
make. His tally shows 727 trees that should be cut with an estimated 
yield of 833 ties, 7x9; 842 ties, 6x8; 438 ties, 6x7; 152 ties, 5x6. In con- 
sidering the yield of ties it should be remembered that the white oak 
and other valuable trees were not marked, and that practically every 
tree of any species that would make a tie was cut between 1906 and 1908. 

FOREST PLANTING 

The forest planting this year was governed in part by the nursery 
stock available for planting. Several of the species that were needed 
could not be obtained. 

A study of the progress of the twenty-three species planted in the 
fifty-five experimental tracts show that the ash, white elm, and cotton- 
wood are not adapted to the "flats," and are dead or dying at the tops. 
The black walnut in all four of the tracts planted are dying at the 
tops. This condition obtains in both high and low ground. The soil 
in which these species are planted is that of old worn-out fields with a 
strata of shale close beneath the surface. 

There is one tract on the forest that was planted to white pine in 
1912, which gives great promise of success. Since a supply of white pine 
seedlings for planting could be obtained at a reasonable price, it was 
decided to underplant the ash, elm and walnut tracts so far as possible 
with white pine. Every tract on the forest was fully replanted this 
year. A few additional^ species were planted this year as an experiment, 
but in small numbers on account of the high price of the seedlings. The 
evergreens used were bought of the Michigan State Nursery. They were 
about three weeks in transit, and arrived in a very dried out condition. 
Practically none of the European larch lived. About 65 per cent of 
the jack pine lived. The white pine varied from twenty-five to seventy- 
five per cent. The seedlings in some boxes were much drier than those 
of others. It is estimated that about 60 per cent of the white pine lived. 
The white pine were a mixture of three- year-old seedlings, and three- 
year-old transplants that were in the transcript beds two years. 

The number of seedlings planted direct to the field during the year 
was as follows: 

417 ash; 930 catalpa; 92 cherry (wild); 58 locust; 681 larch; 282 
oak (white) ; 545 oak (bur) ; 492 olive (Russian; 1,952 pine (jack) ; 
327 red pine; 49,467 pine (white) ; 1,264 tulip; total number of seed and 
seedlings direct to the field, 61,104. In addition 9,172 sugar maple and 
21,767 white pine were planted in the nursery. Grand total, 92,040. 

NURSERY 

The passage of the law to classify forest land, and the purchase of 
additional forest land, makes it imperative that a state nursery be 
developed to take care of the situation. Since money was not available 
to buy a good nursery site, the best site on the forest reserve was selected 
for a temporary nursery. A carload of tile was donated by the penal 
farm which were laid in the nursery site at considerable expense. Sev- 
eral hundred feet of beds three feet wide in which to sow conifer seed 
were made. The physical condition of the soil was improved by plow- 
ing under a thick coat of leaves, stable manure not being obtainable. 



Department of t!oNSERVATiON 269 

The nursery operations were limited on account of funds. Seven pounds 
of conifer seed were planted in the beds which were treated with formal- 
dehyde according to the orthodox formula. A poor germination of white 
pine was obtained but a good percentage of the red and Scotch pine. At 
the end of the season practically all of the white pine had damped off, 
and about 25 per cent of the red and Scotch pine lived. In addition five 
pounds of ginkgo seed were planted which gave a good germination. 

Several small parcels of seed of shrubs and trees were collected 
in Indiana on field trips which were planted as an experiment to study 
what effect the depth of planting would have on germination and the 
effect dry weather would have on killing the plants. It was planned 
to make an accurate study along this line, but the results were inter- 
fered with by a "cloud burst," which washed out many of the seedlings 
and covered others to a depth that killed them before they could be 
uncovered. Nineteen different packets of seed were planted. Usually 
about a pound of each species was used. The seed of each packet was 
divided into threie equal parts. One part was planted at a depth of 
one-half inch. Another part was planted an inch deep. The third part 
was planted an inch and a half deep. On the first day of each month 
during the season the number of plants alive in each section were 
counted. Of course the summer rains would have a very decided effect 
on the number that might die of drought. This year the summer rains 
were abundant and of course the plants from the seed of the shallow 
planting did not suffer and the results of all depths at the end of the 
season were practically the same. It remains to ascertain what effect 
a very dry sunmier would have on shallow rooted plants. The half inch 
depth of planting gave a higher percentage of germination with all 
species except three species of comus and one of hackberry, all of which 
gave the highest germination at one and one-half inch depth of planting. 
This experiment was to ascertain the best depth at which to plant the 
several species of fores-t seed and will be continued, exercising greater 
care to see that nothing interferes with the results. This year early 
in the spring 10,000 one-year-old transplant white pines which were 
planted in a bed three wide, in rows about six inches apart and the 
trees about one to one and a half inches apart in the rows was divided 
into two parts. In one part straw was woven closely in between the 
rows of trees but so as not to cover the leaves. The other half of the 
lot was cultivated during the season. At the end of the season the part 
that was mulched with the straw showed more vigorous plants and had 
fewer to die. Out of 10,000 plants at the end of the season 9,074 were 
alive. 

GROWTH RATE STUDY 

A knowledge of the rate of growth of trees must be available before 
the income from forest land can be computed. This knowledge is so 
fundamental that great efforts have been made to acquire datum so 
that forest land owners may have a knowledge of the rate of interest 
his investment will yield. It is planned to give this subject as much 
attention as possible. 

At the state forest it is planned to caliper every forest tract every 
ten years. By so doing growth rate tables and charts can more easily 



270 



Year Book 



be made and interpreted. During the year tracts 15 and 17 were 
calipered. These tracts are native woodland tracts from, which all of 
its timber of tie size was cut between 1906 and 1908. The tracts are 
located at the base of the eastern slope of the "knobs." The diameter 
of each species was taken at 4^/^ feet above the ground, no allowance 
for bark. The measurements of these tracts are given in order that 
an idea may be had of the kind of trees that grow on this type of forest 
land and their size. 

MEASUREMENTS TAKEN ON TRACT 15, AREA ONE-HALF ACRE 



No. 
of 

trees 


Dia. 
b. 




1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


i 


S 


i 


1 


6 
19 
24 
20 
19 


.2 
.3 
.4 
.5 
.6 
.7 
.8 
.9 
1. 
1.1 
1.2 
1.3 
1.4 
1.5 
1.6 
1.7 
1.9 
2. 
2.1 
2.2 
2.3 
2.4 
2.5 
2.6 
2.7 
2.8 
3. 
3.1 
3.3 
3.4 
3.5 
3.6 
3.7 
3.8 
3.9 
4. 
4.2 
4.4 
4.5 
4.6 
4.7 
4.9 
5. 
5.1 
5.2 
5.3 
5.4 
5 5 
6. 
6.2 
6.4 
7.2 
7.8 
8. 
9.2 
10.7 
14. 
14.2 
14.5 












2 
2 
2 
6 
7 
3 
2 


2 
6 

4 




1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
2 
5 
4 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 










...... 


1 

2 


1 


2 
3 
6 
2 
3 
3 


5 

8 
4 
■ 4 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 










..\. 


1 
1 
1 




1 


1 




1 
2 






17 








12 
4 
17 
11 
10 
7 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
9 
6 
5 
4 
6 
7 
1 










1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


2 




...... 


1 












7 
1 
1 


2 
2 
2 
1 
1 






1 
2 
1 
1 


2 










2 
























2 










1 




1 








1 




2 


1 












1 






1 










1 








1 


























1 
1 






3 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 








1 
1 


1 






















1 






































1 
2 














1 






























3 


























2 
8 










1 






















1 








2 

1 
2 


1 




2 


















4 






















2 






















2 




















1 
1 
1 
1 
...... 

1 
2 
2 






2 






















2 






















3 


















1 
1 




4 


















2 
2 
3 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 




4 
4 








































g 


















1 




3 




















1 






















1 


























2 




















1 






3 






















1 




















1 
1 






2 


















1 

1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 








1 






















3 


























4 






1 




, 










i 






2 




















2 



















1 








1 
























2 




















































1 


























1 


























1 






1 




















1 














1 












1 






















1 
1 




1 

























310 Total number of trees in Tract 15. 



Department of Conservation 

measurements taken on tract 17, area one-half acre 



271 



No. 

of 

trees 


Diameter 
b. 
h. 


< 


1 
1 


1 




1 

is 
g 


1 

^ 

5° 


1 
s 


IS 

1 




26 


.2 

:l 

.5 

.6 
.7 
.8 
.9 
1. 
1.1 
1.2 
1.3 
1.4 
1.5 
• 1.6 
1.7 
1.8 
1.9 
2. 
2.1 
2.2 
2.3 
2.4 
2.5 
2.6 
2.7 
2.8 
2.9 
3. 
3.1 
3.2 
3.3 
3.5 

11 

4.1 

4.2 

4.4 

4.5 

4.6 

4.7 

4.8 

5. 

5.2 

5.4 

5 5 

5.7 

5.8 

6. 

6.1 

6.4 

6.5 

7. 

7.2 

7.8 

8. 

8.3 

8.4 

8.5 

8.6 

8.7 

8.8 

9. 

9.1 

9.3 

9.7 

10. 

11. 

11.1 

12. 

12.9 

13. 


2 
4 
2 
1 


10 
16 
18 
19 
11 
5 
11 
3 
9 
4 
1 


4 

6 

3 
11 
12 

6 

5 
4 
3 
6 
2 

""2"' 
1 
2 

2 

2 

1 


8 
13 
16 
12 

8 
14 
23 

4 
21 
12 
15 

5 

8 

7 
10 

1 


8 
6 

4 
5 
1 ■ 

1 
2 


1 

" 1 








49 
50 

48 


1 
1 


1 
2 

1 
1 


-T- 


39 
30 


1 

2 


1 

2 




35 






12 

48 

24 

27 

9 


........ 

1 
2 


1 


2 
3 
3 

2 


........ 

1 
1 


19 






""'2'" 


2 
2 


■ "1" 


1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
2 
3 

""4" 
2 

1 
1 


2 


17 






2 


13 




1 




6 






2 




9 












4 
















20 
5 




4 


5 




2 


2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 


2 
1 


7 












1 


9 






2 




4 




3 








1 


8 
4 




1 
2 




1 




2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
5 
1 
2 
2 


1 
1 


4 








3 

1 


1 
1 
1 




7 • 






1 
1 
1 


1 






4 








14 






2 


1 




6 






3 
3 

1 
4 

1 


1 


6 








1 






4 








1 


6 








1 




1 


9 










1 
1 
5 






1 














6 
















1 


4 












1 


1 
2 


2 


2 


















1 












1 
2 
1 
2 






4 








1 






1 




1 










8 












1 


4 

1 


1 


2 








1 






2 










2 






1 












1 






4 












1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 


1 


1 


1 












3 














1 
1 




3 














2 


1 












2 
















2 


1 
















1 
















2 








1 

1 




1 

"l" 

1 


1 
.. 1 
2 
2 
2 
1 




5 


1 








5 








3 














3 


1 

1 














2 
















1 












1 
2 




2 


















1 












-1 






1 












1 
1 
1 






1 



















3 












2 






1 












1 ■ 




1 














1 




1 












1 






2 • 














1 




1 






1 










1 










1 








1 














1 




1 








1 










1 














1 





Total number of trees on Tract 17. 



272 Year Book 

forest cleaning 

No forest cleaning was done this year other than utilize some 
dead trees for ties, logs and fuel. 

INSECTS 

No destructive insects appeared this year. The catalpa sphinx had 
two broods as usual but there were not so many this year as in previous 
years. 

FIRES 

The state forest was free from fires this year. All of the fire lines 
were given a thorough cleaning. 

VISITORS 

The state forest is attracting more attention each year. The roads 
and forest plantings are so well marked that many visitors do not 
trouble themselves to register. Then, too, the forest is fast becoming 
an objective point where families meet on Sunday for a visit and have 
their dinners. The recreational feature of the forest is growing fast. 
During the last Sunday in September it was estimated that about seven 
hundred people drove through the forest, but practically no one reg- 
istered. 

The number of visitors who registered at the administration building 
was 1,551. Their addresses according to states were as follows: Indiana, 
1,410; Kentucky, 55; Ohio, 25; Illinois, 13; Michigan, 8; Iowa, 7; Cali- 
fornia, 4; New York, 3; Alabama, 3; Florida, 3; Massachusetts, 2; 
Missouri, 2; Minnesota, 2; Colorado, 2; Montana, 2; New Jersey, 2; 
Nebraska, 2; Washington, 1; Washington D. C, 1; Connecticut, 1; South 
Carolina, 1; Canada, 2. 

RAINFALL AT THE CLARK COUNTY STATE FOREST 

1920 Rain Snow 

October 1.26 

November 2.81 

December 1.25 

1921 

January 2.85 8.50 

February '. . . 3 . 06 4 . 60 

March 4 . 95 

April 3 . 81 

May 2.16 

June 3.28 

July 2.28 

August 4 . 90 

September 4. 31 

OFFICE WORK 

All of the office work is done by the State Forester and stenogra- 
pher. The State Forester spends practically all the summer months in 
the field. 



Department of Conservation 273 



CORRESPONDENCE 

During the year 1,503 first class, 2,864 second class, and 433 third 
class letters were mailed. There were 881 first class letters received. 

REPORTS 

Practically all of the reports of the office are out of print. The 
few copies remaining are held for requests from the larger libraries. 
During the year Deam's "Trees of Indiana" was published, and was 
received for distribution April 20, 1921. It was published from the 
funds of the department of conservation and is not for free distribution 
but is sold at $1.25 per copy, which is to cover the cost of publication. 
Of this publication 390 copies were sent to libraries and exchanges and 
363 have been sold. 

LIBRARY 

The library now contains 2,339 titles of which 87 were added dur- 
ing the year. The office is also a subscriber to one lumber and three 
forestry journals. 

FIELD WORK 

During the year 104 days were spent in the field in addition to sev- 
eral days spent on the state forest. Most of the field work was done 
by auto, and 4,880 miles were traveled. The field work extended to all 
parts of the state, and was made principally for the inspection of wood- 
land for classification as forest land. During the year 91 woodlands 
were inspected for classification. In doing field work many valuable 
notes are taken and made record of and botanical specimens are taken. 
It is to be noted that the year as a whole had an abundant rainfall, but 
that there was a period of drought during early summer. This drought 
killed many of the beech trees in the vicinity of Kosciusko county. The 
black oaks also died in considerable numbers in some parts of northern 
Indiana. The ash in a woodland near Arlington were defoliated by a 
new insect pest which will be reported by the State Entomologist. 

Observations are made in doing field work on the fruiting of the 
shrubs and trees of the state. It is to be noted that there has not been 
a full crop of forest seed for many years. This year very few of the 
trees and shrubs bore fruit. Of all of the shrubs only the spice bush 
had a full crop. Only exceptionally did the wild grapes have fruit except 
Vitis aestivalis. The Dogwood (Cornus Florida) had a full crop of 
seed in all parts of the state. Of the larger forest trees none had a full 
crop in all parts of the state. 

Some species of oak had a moderate crop in restricted areas. The 
white oak in the southeastern part of the state. The chestnut oak had 
a fair crop in all of its range. The small-fruited hickory a fair crop in 
the northern part of Indiana. The big shellbark and little shellbark a 
fair crop in the southern part. There were no ash, beech, sugar maple, 
linn, hackberry, honey locust, black gum, or black locust seed this year. 
The persimmon was well fruited in all parts. There was a moderate 
crop of black walnuts in northern Indiana, but the butternut was a 
failure. 

18—19930 



274 Year Book 

state fair exhibit 

The state fair exhibit was a duplicate of last year's exhibit. It 
seems difficult to make an exhibit to compete with the many attractions 
at a state fair. Our exhibit was well attended and well worth the time 
and energy spent upon it. 

CO-OPERATIVE FOREST PLANTINGS 

No nev/ plantings were established this year. The one in Jackson 
county on the county farm was visited and found in excellent condition 
and making a fine growth. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF LAND AND WATER 



CHAS. G. SAUERS, Acting Superintendent. 

R. P. LUKE, Superintendent of State Parks. 

JOHN M. DAVIS, Custodian McCormick's Creek Canyon. 

The state park system of Indiana had its beginning in 1916. It 
started through a desire to preserve for present and future generations 
some of the areas of primitive Indiana, and also historic spots. Just 
what capacity the state park would fill, mode of management and sys- 
tem of development was not clearly defined nor recognized. The expe- 
rience of five years, however, has produced a plan of action and system 
of management, and a definite purpose for state parks. They fill that 
desire of the public for a recreation space which has no artificiality and 
brings them in close contact with the environment of their forebears. 
The city park and the national park have their reasons for existence. 
The former as breathing spots in a region of intensive population and 
the latter to fill the desire for the spectacular, the unusual, and to im- 
press upon us the grandeur of our country. 

There must needs be a place where the people of small means may 
go and seek rest, recreation and change in an environment entirely 
different from their usual habitat. This is the mission of state parks 
in Indiana. It does not follow, however, that the state must furnish 
these free of charge and so the ideal of the department is to create 
state parks which are self-sustaining, and which are not a permanent 
load upon the tax duplicate. In order to achieve this situation the state 
must invest some capital. In the development of tracts which are either 
donated or purchased there must be provided parks and roads to make 
the area accessible. Water supply must be adequate and proper sani- 
tary measures established, space must be set aside for the camper, and 
hotel facilities for those who desire them. 

It is true that the state parks are the property of the people of 
the state and that they have paid for the original investment, but it 
does not follow that they may use this free of charge. The taxpayer 
who does make use of his state park should be willing to pay for the 
privilege and through this plan the state park may be made self-sustain- 



Department of Conservation 275 

ing. Turkey Run is our state park experiment station and the plans 
of the department have been developed from the experience derived from 
it. The following figures show total capital invested in Turkey Run and 
revenue obtained: 

TURKEY RUN 

Investment — 

By State Park Commission : 

State appropriation $37,978 17 

Private donation 36,042 65 

By Department of Conservation 25,164 66 

From Governor's fund for new land 9,733 40 

$108,918 88 
Receipts for the year — 

Gate reseipts $5,396 60 

Auto storage 467 75 

Concessions 2,826 25 

■ '■ $8,690 60 

Return on total investment of 7.9%. 

Return on appropriated funds is 11.9%. 

Total income from Turkey Run since 1917 is $23,608.54. 

Classification of Turkey Run Expenditures, Since Its Beginning 

Land purchased $50,809 02 

Improvements 49,291 63 

Maintenance and repairs ^ 8,818 23 



$108,918 88 
TURKEY RUN 

The index of the value of a state park is the attendance. Turkey 
Run, under a well considered system of development, presents some inter- 
esting figures. The paid attendance for 1919 was 38,145; for 1920 was 
45,297; and for 1921 was 54,107. These figures do not represent the 
actual daily attendance, for a person may come and spend a day, two 
days, two weeks or a month and only pay his admission once. Like- 
wise, throughout the winter months there is a fair attendance of which 
no accurate account is kept, so the department will be very safe in 
doubling the figures which are here represented. 

Not only is the attendance at the park proper increasing annually, 
but along with it is a tremendous demand for hotel accommodations. In 
the past season it has been necessary to turn away from four to five 
times as many hotel patrons as could be accommodated. 

Through their own observation the officials of the department dis- 
covered that Turkey Run is as fine in winter as in summer and there 
was installed complete heating equipment for the hotel. The park is 
now accessible to the public throughout the year and indications are 
that it will be popular as a winter resort. It likewise serves in the 
winter time as a community center to the people for twenty miles 
around. There are many reunions, socials and dances held in the hotel, 
practically the only available building for this. The large assembly 
room with its huge fireplace is not only comfortable but ample. For 
the coming winter the department will attempt through the various civic 
and public organizations of the state to make even' greater use of the, 



276 



Year Book 




Department of Conservation 277 

park during the winter as a rendezvous for touring parties, meeting 
place of small conventions and a resort for those desiring a winter 
vacation. 

The five cottages which were built late last year have proved their 
popularity and have well served their purpose by doubling the hotel 
sleeping capacity. Electric lights were installed early in the season to 
reduce the fire hazard which accompanies the use of oil lamps. As a 
further insurance against fire there was purchased a wheeled extin- 
guisher of 50 gallons capacity which should be adequate for any fire 
which might develop, if caught in its early stage. Most of the buildings 
are also equipped with hand fire extinguishers. 

Probably the most notable development of the park was the acquisi- 
tion of 181 acres lying south and east of the old reservation from which 
the merchantable timber had been removed. This gives an opportunity 
to bring the main entrance to the park on a state highway and at the 
same time allows the development of a very beautiful drive through this 
new section as an approach to the hotel. It will be necessary to fence 
this new addition along the road and to do considerable cleaning up of 
the slash left from timber operations. Fortunately there is a sufficient 
young timber left standing to give ample shade and grow eventually 
into a very fine timber tract. Footpaths will also be developed in this 
new section so as to make it readily accessible.. 

Sunset Point, at the junction of Turkey Run and Sugar Creek, had 
been wearing away for some time through the erosion of the soil and it 
seemed as though we might lose one of the chief observation points 
which commands a view of Sugar Creek. Through considerable in- 
genuity a concrete retaining wall and terraces were constructed so as 
to hold the soil and the point is now permanently established without 
marring the natural landscape in the least. 

There has heretofore been a flight of earth steps and ramps leading 
from the top of the cliff to the swinging bridge over the creek. This 
necessitated constant repair and was not satisfactory. During the sum- 
mer concrete steps were constructed, so designed as to make a natural 
descent and which will no doubt perform their service for many years 
to come without further outlay. 

The increased attendance at the park has necessitated a larger police 
force over the week-ends, and the employment of a patrolman through- 
out the season. The fire hazard is a constant menace where a cigarette 
butt or match may start a blaze which would ruin acres of woods. There 
is rarely any trouble with law-breakers or rowdies at this park, but the 
rules in regard to building fires, picking flowers and ferns, and defacing 
cliffs, require constant enforcement. 

The heating plant was installed under the servants' quarters. This 
required the digging of a cellar and construction of a large brick chim- 
ney. This cellar was extended so as to permit the enlargement of the 
servants' quarters by four rooms and underneath them an engine room 
for the light plant, and a laundry. This building now has ten sleeping 
rooms and a three-room basement. Dry wells were also constructed as 
auxiliaries to the sewage disposal plant. 



278 Year Book 

A trestle carries the road through the new addition across Newby 
Gulch. This gulch has been recently christened in honor of Mr. Arthur 
C. Newby of Indianapolis, who largely aided by generous financial assist- 
ance in the acquisition of Turkey Run. This trestle, 145 feet long, was 
designed by the division of engineering and built by the superintendent 
of state parks. It is a massive structure and we are proud of its 
achievement entirely within our own organization. 

In the spring Turkey Run was visited by a small tornado which 
uprooted one poplar, two oaks and five maples, all of them of great 
size and located on the plateau about the hotel. The only wonder was 
that no buildings were touched. 

Through the co-operation with the new division of engineering there 
has been obtained an accurate and detailed topographic map of the entire 
reservation. We are now able to locate new paths in the most logical 
and economical way and to develop our water and sewage disposal sys- 
tems. The engineers have located the new drive of the main entrance 
to the hotel and designed and supervised the construction of a trestle 
over Newby Gulch for the new road. The lack of adequate water sup- 
ply and the necessity of further development of sewage disposal has been 
a continuous problem from the beginning of the park. During the com- 
ing winter the engineer and sanitary engineer will make a thorough 
study of this development in co-operation with Purdue University and 
the department will undertake what they prescribe so as to have it in 
readiness for next year's season. 

There will also be developed, located and constructed, further paths 
which will make every point in the park accessible without too strenuous 
exercise. In connection with path development it is proposed to try out 
the use of burros as a carrier for youngsters and old people. They are 
very successfully used in the west for the same purpose and there seems 
to be no reason why they would not be ideal at Turkey Run. Of course, 
sufficient charge will be made for their use to cover their maintenance, 
supervision and return interest on the investment. 

The question of hotel accommodations which has been referred to 
above must have immediate attention. There are two possibilities — that 
of building another large hotel, or to develop the cottage system. A 
preliminary examination indicates that the large hotel would be the more 
economical method and would also permit winter usage which is hardly 
possible with a large number of scattered cottages. Since the present 
hotel has shown that it will pay an ample return on the investment and 
the demand for accommodations proves the necessity of greatly increased 
hotel facilities it is assuredly not a losing venture for the state. 

The extreme heat during the past summer has revived a great inter- 
est in bathing and swimming and Sugar Creek in the park has been a 
delight to the visitors. This necessitates the provision of adequate bath 
houses where bathers may change clothes and where bathing suits may 
be rented. There should be two places along the creek for this purpose, 
one at the mouth of Turkey Run for those who can not swim but desire 
to bathe and paddle about, and the other at Goose Rock for those who 
desire deeper water. At both places there are small sand beaches and 
they are within easy walking distance of the parking grounds. 



Department of Conservation 279 

m'cormick's creek 

Because sufficient funds were not available early in the year the 
development of this park was considerably delayed. As a result of this 
delay the department did not think it loj>ical to charge a gate fee and so 
there is no accurate account of the attendance. Nevertheless the park 
has been visited by a good many thousands and is rapidly becoming 
known to the state. 

The hotel in the park has been changed from an unsystematically 
planned and uninviting building to a delightful summer hotel. This 
necessitated the building of a small addition for kitchen and serving 
pantry, which also provides a cellar, not before available. The entire 
interior of the main building was removed and developed into a large 
dining room, assembly room below and thirteen sleeping rooms and a 
bath above. The rooms have all been pleasingly decorated and the entire 
interior presents a cozy and pleasing appearance. There was built just 
south of the hotel a small building which houses an electric generator 
and batteries that furnish light and power for pumping. The kitchen 
and bath are of course provided with modern plumbing and a large 
septic tank built for sewage disposal. 

This development required until mid-summer, and then considerable 
delay was encountered in securing furniture for the dining room and 
assembly room. This is fibre reed type made at the state prison. The 
sleeping rooms and kitchen are furnished by the concessionaire. Broad 
porches run the length of the hotel on both floors and these are furnished 
with swings and rockers. 

In order to develop the view from the main porch of the hotel the 
garage and small barn were removed to a well screened location and 
the other farm buildings have been changed to the same vicinity so that 
there now appears to the visitor the broad lawn and edge of the wood- 
land. The necessity of using our one large well for water supply within 
the hotel required the digging of a new well for drinking purposes. 
Here considerable trouble was encountered due to a stratum of very soft 
shale lying about one hundred feet below the surface, but this was suc- 
cessfully overcome and a good well secured. 

The bathing pool which was constructed during the present year 
proved to be a great boon to the visitors to the park and was used 
very intensively. 

This park is now in such shape with the adequate hotel facilities 
and accommodations for large crowds so that it should develop rapidly 
in popularity the next season. As is usual with state parks there still 
remains a great deal to be done. There must be provided bath houses, 
both at the swimming pool and on White River. The park is not as 
well provided with foot paths as desirable. Although practically all 
points in the park are readily accessible, the public is not apt to inspect 
anything except that which they can reach by a comfortable path. There 
also remains undeveloped the very fine frontage along White River, 
which includes a very excellent gravel and sand bar. One thing which 
has deterred this is the condition of White River, due to the pollution 
by Indianapolis and cities lower down. It is hoped that this vnW be 



280 Year Book 

done away with when new sewage disposal plants are completed and 
that the river will then be in such condition as to permit recreational 
use. 

The road from the park proper to the state highway has twice been 
graveled and is now in good condition for automobile traffic. This work 
was done by the township trustee with gravel from the bar on White 
River in the park. Also the division graveled the road around the hotel 
and to the swimming pool. No further road development in the park 
will be attempted until a topographic survey is available. 

CLIFTY FALLS 

Clifty Falls was turned over to the state rather late in the season, 
so no attempt has been made to carry on any great amount of develop- 
ment until the engineers had completed a topographic survey. The park 
is of such nature, being extremely rugged, that little could be done in 
locating roads and footpaths until this map was completed. The funds 
available for development are comparatively meager and any road that 
is built will be rather costly, since it must necessarily be built on a very 
steep slope. The big problem in the development of this area is to make 
it accessible to the visitors and this will largely be through the medium 
of footpaths. There are many spectacular views, all which require con- 
siderable climbing and hiking to reach and it is the nature of the public 
in general to demand pathways to these points. 

It is hoped that through co-operation with the Southeastern Hos- 
pital for the Insane there may be obtained the site adjacent to the park 
known as Thomas Hill on which is now situated a fine old farm house. 
From the top of Thomas Hill one may look miles up and down the Ohio 
Valley and the view is probably the most spectacular in the state. Con- 
sequently it is ideal for a hotel site and this one point alone would insure 
ample patronage. This site may also be reached by a comparatively 
short road coming up from the main highway. At the foot of the slope 
there are ample facilities for those who wish to park their cars at that 
level. It is a short distance from Madison proper and can be made 
the center of park interest. 

It is hoped that at Clifty Falls we may try our first experiment in 
the possibility of a state park with railway connections. At the pres- 
ent time there is within a mile of the park a spur of the Pennsylvania 
railroad. An attempt will be made at a later date to have this spur 
continued within the park and thus be able to supplement the park at- 
tendance by use of excursions. Parks that lie two or three miles from 
a railroad point do not receive the patronage from visitors by rail that 
would be expected. We surely can not develop state parks for the use 
of those running automobiles only. 

There can be no question as to the ultimate popularity and wide use 
of this park. It is blessed with a spectacular scenery on a huge scale 
which can not be surpassed in the state. It commands a broad view 
of the Ohio Valley. There are some nineteen beautiful waterfalls of 
which Clifty Falls is the largest. It is readily accessible by automobile 
and steam road and river. Its disadvantage is that its extreme rugged- 



Department of Conservation 281 

ness necessitates the expenditure of considerable funds to make it ac- 
cessible to crowds. However, such funds will be well spent and would 
soon place the park on a self-sustaining basis. 

VINEGAR MILLS 

This is the first park that has been given the state without any 
financial assistance or without any encumbrance whatsoever. It is 
ideally situated at the junction of two trunk highways and accessible to 
three railroads and lying between the towns of Vernon and North 
Vernon. It is not spectacular but is finely timbered, has a varied and 
interesting topography and lies partly along the Muscatatuck River. 

In giving it to the state the people of the community have demon- 
strated their interest in advancement of the state and their belief in 
Indiana as a coming tourist mecca. It will be developed as a caravansary 
for auto tourists, community meeting place and vacation resort as rap- 
idly as funds become available. 

LAFAYETTE SPRINGS 

The state is to be the recipient of the land containing the historic 
Lafayette Springs. This spot is at the foot of the Ohio River bluffs 
about four miles northeast of Cannelton. The donors are Mr. and Mrs. 
J. C. Shallcross of Cannelton, who are giving it in honor of a son lost 
in the recent war. It will also be a memorial to all the soldiers of 
Perry county lost in the late v/ar. 

The spot has great historic significance, has a beautiful setting on 
the Ohio and can be well developed into a historic shrine. It is the 
first reservation in the state to be set aside as a monument or memo- 
rial, similar to the great national monuments. No doubt it will be the 
cause for the setting aside of many more historic spots in the state, 
under the state's jurisdiction, which will insure their permanence. 

KANKAKEE LANDS 

There remains of the Kankakee lands some 6,000 acres belonging 
to the state. Of this there are a number of tracts in their virgin state 
and of sufficient size for use as public recreation grounds. There exists 
against this state land a drainage assessment of $42,000. There has 
been some thought of selling the land in question to cover the drainage 
costs. This, the department has of course opposed and for the reasons 
set down in the enclosed letter from the director to the Governor. 

"September 21, 1921. 

Sir — Regarding the payment of approximately $42,000 in accrued drainage costs of 
certain state land along the Kankakee River, I very respectfully suggest that in order 
to hold said acreage for further use of the people of Indiana, that you, through your 
finance board, set aside the needful sum from the specific appropriation of $300,000, for 
the purpose of giving the Department of Conservation the opportunity to hold and 
develop the land for public uses. 

The Department of course realizes that until a decision has been reached in the 
case of the Tuesburg Land Company the entire matter of ownership is still in doubt. 



282 Year Book 

Having in charge the natural resources of the state, we protest as respectfully as ener- 
getically against the disposition of these lands by sale, and for the purpose of making 
this position more clear, submit the following statement: 

The purpose of conservation is to keep the resources of the world in suflScient 
abundance so that man may have a happy, fruitful life, free from suffering — a rela- 
tively easy physical existence, and by so reducing the struggle for existence, to thus 
give an opportunity for development to a higher intellectual and spiritual level. 

One of the great instruments of conservation has been drainage, through making 
available great areas of land for the production of foodstuffs. It does not necessarily 
follow that all drainage is conservation, for upon proper investigation it is highly pos- 
sible that an area now existing as lakes, ponds or swamps will yield a distinctly larger 
return in its natural condition than would the same area drained and used for agri- 
culture. Under intelligent management these areas will yield the community abundant 
and varied returns as indicated in the following brief summary of their productiveness : 

(1) Food and game fish. 

(2) Wild fowl to be shot for sport and food. 

(3) Resting places for migratory birds. Breeding places for all. 

(4) Furs from muskrats, skunk and raccoon. 

(5) A natural ice supply. 

(6) A definite and invaluable help in maintaining the underground water level and 
in helping hold back the run-off of rainfall to prevent excessive erosion and other 
damage. 

(7) Opportunities for healthful and interesting recreation for the citizens of the 
state. 

(8) For educational uses in interesting the people of the state in out-of-door life. 

(9) With the advent of the automobile, wild places for outings and camping spots 
have come into great demand. The tourist traffic of the country increases by the many 
thousands each year. The communities which have such reservations will find them a 
source of great profit. The tourist has money and is spending it. The communities 
where he comes are the recipients of a large amount of liquid capital as the result of 
the trade with the tourist population. 

The lakes and streams of Indiana are the lure to out-of-door life for the people of 
small means. Here the city dweller as well as the rural population finds recreation for 
the asking, and opportunities for out-of-door life present a sort of balance wheel which 
saves us from being smothered in the great rush for the necessities. Surely there must 
be some end to the wholesale destruction of our native heritage. Those areas are God- 
given spots, for 'In my Father's house are many mansions.' They have a definite and 
necessary purpose just as much as our broad and fertile acres of tillable land. They 
must be retained for present generations and for the era of greatly inceased popula- 
tion which must follow." 

THE DUNES 

The dunes of Lake Michigan in Indiana continue to be the premier 
objective of state park development in the state. There can be no 
question as to their desirability, their accessibility and adaptability to the 
purpose in hand. Aside from this, however, we must come to recognize 
their necessity to Indiana and to the nation. Since there is no precedent 
and no apparent possibility of the federal government taking action, it 
becomes the privilege and duty of Indiana, with private assistance, to 
preserve this heritage and God-given spot. 

The legislature balks at the expenditure required because we have 
never done anything so big before. But a million dollars is not a large 
expenditure for a community of three million souls, upon a project which 
will repay in happiness, contentment, pride and actual dollars many 
times its first cost. 

There is presented the argument that this district might all be de- 
veloped into greater Garys. This is highly impossible and altogether un- 



Department of Conservation 283 

desirable. This district holds no corner on the properties which make a 
location suitable for steel manufacture. The district is now greatly over- 
populated with a conglomeration of nationalities and beliefs. The dunes 
are the poverbial melting pot for the heterogeneous population. To 
greatly enlarge the present conditions would be inviting social suicide. 

Here lies the opportunity to do a great and good thing in a huge 
way. It is neither foolish nor theoretical but is wise and most practical. 
Opportunity knocks and bids Hoosierdom open. 

VERSAILLES 

There is proposed a state park in the Laughery Valley on land lying 
adjacent to Versailles in Ripley county. The donor is Joseph Hass- 
mer, a native of the county and recently returned there as resident. 
The site is excellent and permits of an almost ideal development of a 
great number of camping places along a most excellent fishing stream 
which combine with this property delightful banks and environment. 

This park would be a memorial to the soldiers of Ripley county and 
a memorial drive through the park will be constructed. There remains 
to be adjusted the status as regards the local conditions affecting it and 
arrangements by which the tract may be developed. 

This park is readily accessible by auto to residents of southeastern 
Indiana and southwestern Ohio. It contains more than a mile of one 
of our most beautiful streams which abounds in fish. There is in the 
proposed area land which is well located for forestry experiments, and 
the whole is readily adapted as a community meeting place. 

THE CAMPER 

There is a consistent and growing demand for camp sites. To meet 
this the department will provide more camping facilities than hereto- 
fore on all reservations under its control. Sites must be selected with 
extreme care, so as to insure fairly convenient and pure water supply, 
cause no harm to vegetation, permit use of camp fire without forest fire 
danger or injury to timber, and yet be convenient to the center of traffic 
in the park. This work can well be carried on in winter when but 
little else is possible. This requires extra policing, for the new camper 
has not as yet learned the good manners of out-door life. 

The Clark, county state forest is readily adaptable to the campers' 
purposes. It is a wooded tract of over 2,000 acres in the heart of the 
knob country. The railroad, traction system and state highway run 
along one boundary. It lacks water supply but this will be developed. 
Here the fire hazard is great and the campers will have to be thoroughly 
instructed and a patrolman will be employed. 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PARKS 

There was held in Des Moines, Iowa, on January 21 and 22, 1921, a 
national conference on parks, the purpose of which was to arouse inter- 
est in the development of state parks and to bring together such knowl- 



284 Year Book 

edge as was already available upon the establishment of such areas. 
The conference was fostered by the secretary of the interior through 
the National Park Service under Stephen T. Mather. 

There were in attendance men and women from practically every 
state; meetings were enthusiastic and a broadened point of view and 
renewed enthusiasm for the movement was the result. Campaigns for 
parks in states heretofore without them resulted. States having parks 
lying undeveloped learned from those older in experience. Indiana was 
represented by the assistant to the director who delivered an address 
on "State Parks, A Cure For Industrial Ills." Richard Lieber, director, 
was made a member of a comittee on the next conference and Chas. G. 
Sauers, a member of the committee on legislative drafts. 

This conference demonstrated that Indiana is a pioneer in state 
park work, has a system comparable with any other, and much more 
complete than a large majority. Our experience in obtaining park sites, 
plan of making the parks pay their way, and proposed complete sys- 
tem proved a great help to the conference. 

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF STATE REVENUE 

There exist three possible sources of revenue to the state which 
are as yet undeveloped because of legal questions. Under the bed of 
the Wabash lie approximately 100,000,000 tons of minable coal. The 
bed of the river is the property of the state and consequently the coal, 
if the river is a navigable stream. Likewise the gravel and sand de- 
posits under all navigable streams are state property under the same 
conditions. The navigability of Indiana streams is an undecided ques- 
tion in the courts and the department has not been able to secure legal 
assistance necessary to the settlement of this question. 

The bed of Lake Michigan in Indiana is a great sand bed. Sand is 
removed by ships known as "sand suckers." Recently an injunction was filed 
against further removal of this sand on the grounds that it is the prop- 
erty of the people of Indiana. Some way must be found to make use 
of this resource at a profit to the state. This is a case where non-use 
of a resource is pure waste fdr the sand deposits are constantly being 
replenished. This again is a legal matter. 

THE TOURIST 

That a demand for such information might be fulfilled, the division 
compiled and published a folder, "Points of Interest in Indiana." This 
consists of a map of the state highways and some tributaries on which 
is located in red, 92 points of scenic, historic and sight-seeing interest 
in the state. On the back is a key to the map with a short description 
of each point and information on state parks and reservations controlled 
by the department. It is much in demand and a first edition of 5,000 was 
soon exhausted. When the present edition is exhausted the publication 
will be amplified and revised. 

Hoosiers themselves are not alive to the touring possibilities in their 
own state, the many recreational spots and sights to be seen. Certain 



Department of Conservation 285 

districts, such as the lake counties are realizing what an asset their 
lakes are. They see the great summer colonies that are attracted and 
the future of their counties as tourist centers and the increased business 
that is a consequence. These possibilities are not confined to the lake 
counties. Localities having fishing streams such as the Tippecanoe, 
Laughery Creek and Eel River, those having great wooded areas such 
as Brown, Crawford and Perry, and those containing spots of great 
historic interest such as" Franklin, Lake and Posey, all have the oppor- 
tunity to develop a big business in tourist traffic. Our excellent system 
of highways, steam and electric roads are already available. This de- 
partment never permits any opportunity to slip by whereby the state 
may be boosted both at home and nationally. 

Many cities and towns are providing camping sites for auto tour- 
ists and many more should follow the lead. Towns might well increase 
the attractiveness of their entrances, stimulate an air of real hospitality, 
insure against overcharging and all the various and easily acquired de- 
tails which make the stranger glad to be there and anxious to return. 

FINAL REPORT OF STATE PARK COMMISSION 
August 1, 1921 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand as per report of September 20, 1920 $2,083 74 

Which does not include — 

Advanced to Mr. John M. Davis 200 05 

Advanced to Mr. R. P. Luke 268 94 

$2,552 73 

Received from Department of Conservation 2,452 10 

$5,004 83 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Labor $4,143 09 

Material 155 30 

Automobile 173 35 

Freight and express 209 36 

Administration and office expense 284 73 

Insurance 39 00 

$5,004 83 



286 Year Book 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 



GEORGE N. MANNFELD, Superintendent of Fisheries and Game. 
GEORGE BERG, Superintendent of State Fish Hatcheries. 
ANDREW E. BODINE, State Organizer. 

MARGARET BINKLEY, Bookkeeper, Clerk and Stenographer. 
CHARLES J. O'MAHONY, Assistant Clerk. 

STATE FISH HATCHERIES 

Riverside Park Hatchery, Indianapolis 

WILLIAM BORDENKECHER, Foreman. 
LEWIS J. AMOS, HENRY BILTZ, EDWARD HILTON, Assistants. 

Wawasee Hatchery, Lake Wawasee 

JACOB CLICK, Foreman. 
FRANK BROWN, Assistant. 

Tri-Lakes Hatchery, Tri-Lakes 
JOHN H. FLEMING, Foreman. 

Bass Lake Hatchery, Bass Lake 
FRANK HAY, Foreman. 

GAME WARDEN SERVICE 

RODNEY D. FLEMING, Chief Game Warden 
FREDERICK M. EHLERS, Secretary Game Warden Service 

GAME WARDENS ON SALARY 

Barber, Al. D. Gallion, A. M. *Luke, Roland P. 

Beloat, Thomas H. Garrabrant, Wm. E. Miles, Charles C. 

Bravy, J. J. Gilpin, Cecil R. Neal, Oliver C. 

Butler, Thomas F. Hardy, Chance N. ■ Randall, John H. 

Chamberlin, James D. Havel, Jacob Rohrabaugh, Roy 

Click, Emanuel Hoemig, Walter Stansell, Gregg T. 

Crecelius, Philip Holstine, A. E. Vanderford, Andrew 

*Davis, John M. fJones, Edward Walker, Harry 

Dixon, Clifton E. Lapham, Frank G. Wyatt, George W. 

FOREWORD 

The fish and game division is self-supporting, receiving no appro- 
priation from the legislature. It must raise its own funds to work with. 
It is financed by the sale of hunting and fishing licenses to sportsmen. 
In fact, instead of being an expense to the taxpayers, it helps to reduce 

* Custodian State Park, salary paid by Fish and Game Division, 
t Custodian Warden House, Wawasee. 



Department of Conservation 287 

their taxes, since all the money collected from fines assessed aj^ainst 
violators of game and fish laws goes into the common school fund. The 
heavier the fines, and the more of them assessed, the more the people are 
benefited. Heavy fines also tend to discourage the illegal taking of fish, 
game and other wild life. Licenses to hunt and fish are issued in the 
office of the division, but the bulk of them are sold by the county clerks 
in the several counties of the state. The division also appoints agents 
in this and other states who handle its non-resident licenses. In Marion 
county, the licenses are not placed in the hands of the county clerk, but 
are sold in the office of the division, also by appointed agents, usually 
by stores handling sporting goods. The bulk of the license sales are 
the $1.00 resident licenses which carry with them the right to either 
hunt or fish. They net the division ninety cents. Clerks and agents 
are allowed to retain ten cents for their fee. Those sold in the office of 
the division are the only ones netting it a full dollar. Each clerk and 
agent authorized to issue licenses is required to report on the first day 
of each month, informing the department of the number of licenses issued 
during the month preceding, giving the names of the licensees, and the 
number of blank licenses remaining in his possession. Making settle- 
ments of this kind monthly requires extensive clerical work which must 
be carefully attended to so all accounts balance. In addition to the 
money raised by license sales, the division receives a fee of $5.00 in all 
cases of conviction or on plea of guilty of persons violating the acts pro- 
tecting fish, game, fur-bearing animals and birds, or acts in relation 
thereto. This fee is assessed as part of the costs. The sum raised from 
this source, however, is not large, amounting to only five per cent of the 
division's total receipts. A record of all arrests made by game wardens 
is kept in the office on a docket. In this manner fees are properly ac- 
counted for. The funds raised from the sale of licenses and fees from 
fines are kept in a separate fund in the state treasury. It is known as 
the Fish and Game Protection and Propagation Fund. The law provides 
that it be used for purposes connected with protection and propagation 
of fish, game and birds. 

On account of the extended interest in hunting and fishing, very few 
offices in the State House have as much attention directed to them as 
the fish and game division. The volume of mail coming in and going 
out amounts to considerable. Records are kept of all mail coming in 
and going out. In the year 1920, records show 15,154 letters and pack- 
ages were handled. In the fiscal year 1921 just closed 21,138 pieces of 
mail were handled, a gain of 5,984 over the number handled in the year 
previous. A substantial increase was noticeable in the number of let- 
ters asking for information as to laws. Many also carried complaints 
as to violations. The increase in the communications received lead to 
the belief that stimulus has been given to wild life conservation, and 
that the general public has confidence in the department to accomplish 
results expected of it. 

NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED 

The maximum number of persons employed in the division on sal- 
ary during the fiscal year 1921 was forty-two. At the beginning of the 



288 . Year Book 

new fiscal year, October 1, 1921, forty-four persons are registered on its 
payroll. They are employed in the four branches of the division's work 
as follows: In the office, three; in the warden service, twenty- seven ; 
fish cultural work, nine; game experiment station, one; organization of 
fish, game and bird protective associations, one. The salaries of the 
custodians of the state parks at Turkey Eun and at McCormick's Creek 
are paid from the funds of the division, as they act as game wardens. 

* MOTOR CARS 

The division owns sixteen motor cars which are used in transporting 
game wardens about the state, and in delivering fish to applicants from 
the state fish hatcheries. Eleven of these cars are used by game ward- 
ens, the other five are in use at the fish hatcheries. The actual mileage 
traveled by each car is computed and kept of record. Gasoline, tires, 
repairs for each car are charged against those driving them. By this 
means the actual cost per year and per mile can be computed. In the 
fiscal year just closed, the cost per mile of ten Ford cars used in the 
game warden service was five and eighty-three one-hundredths cents 
per mile. They traveled a total of 161,063 miles. All tires are fur- 
nished direct from the office, the number of each being registered, also 
the time of going into use. Worn-out tires and tubes are required to be 
sent to the office for checking up, also for adjustment. 

CONDENSED REPORT 

The number of pages allotted for this report being limited, it is 
possible only to briefly touch upon the four branches of its work. Each 
of them is taken up separately. These branches are the main office, 
where the policy of the division is formulated and the records of all kinds 
are kept; game warden service; state fish hatcheries and organization 
of fish, game and bird protective associations. 

MANAGEMENT 

By comparing the records established by the division since becom- 
ing a part of the Department of Conservation with the records of the 
former fish and game commission, it will be noticed that great headway 
has been made. Public confidence in the division has been established, 
chiefly through the systematic manner in which its work is conducted. 

Much has been said and written on the subject of fish and game 
conservation, many advocates leaning more to the educational line of 
bringing about the preservation of wild life, than in attempting the 
vigorous enforcement of the game and fish laws. Getting away from 
the police idea of securing law observance will bring no results. It has 
the same effect as preaching honesty to thieves. They have more re- 
spect for the police than they have for reformers. Fish pirates 
and game hogs have respect only for a game warden who makes arrests. 
Preaching conservation to such folks is useless. The policy of the divi- 
sion is to enforce all game and fish laws without fear or favor, and to 
educate where education will do good. 



Department of Conservation 289 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

The receipts of the fish and game division for the fiscal year 1921 
were $132,852.65. Disbursements were $116,267.83, leaving an unex- 
pended balance of $16,584.82. Receipts and disbursements for the year 
preceding, and for the years 1918 and 1919 are given to show by com- 
parison how the business of the division has advanced. I believe this to 
be due to better system and management. The following table explains 
itself: 

Fish and Game Receipts Fish and Game Disbursements 

1918 $89,149 96 1918 $96,199 36 

1919 95,159 31 1919 81,418 50 

1920 126,148 93 1920 109,918 56 

1921 132,852 65 1921 116,267 83 

Note — The receipts and disbursements for the year 1918 and for the first six months 
of 1919 were under the former fish and game department. Those for 1920 and 1921 
were wholly under the present Division of Fish and Game. 

NUMBER OF FEES AND AMOUNT REALIZED THEREFROM IN 1921 

There were 1,268 fees of $5.00 each collected from courts during 
the fiscal year 1921. These brought the division $6,340.00. This and 
the money received from license sales, go into the fish and game protec- 
tion and propagation fund, as provided for by law. To properly collect 
all fees due requires extensive bookkeeping. To know when and from 
whom feee are due, each case must be correctly recorded on a docket 
record. Game wardens report on arrests once each week, giving com- 
plete data. When a case is lost, appealed, or the defendant decides to 
lay out his fine in jail, no fee is collectible. The final outcome of each 
case must therefore be known. This requires constant vigilance and 
continual posting on the docket record. Justices of the peace and other 
courts are required by law to pay the fees due the department promptly. 
Notwithstanding this, payment often is deferred, or not made until de- 
manded. No part of the division's work is so complicated or entails 
more careful attention. 

LICENSE SALES IN 1921 

One hundred thirty-seven thousand and fifty-four licenses to hunt and 
fish in the state were issued in the fiscal year just passed, an increase of 
8,756 over the amount sold in the year preceding. A very substantial 
increase was made over sales in 1918 and 1919. The sales in 1921 ex- 
ceeded sales of 1918 by 44,388, and exceeded those of 1919 by 37,236. The 
following table shows the number and kind of each license sold in the 
last four years: 

Total Resident Non-Resident Non-Resident 

Licenses Sold Hunting and Fishing Fishing Hunting 

1918 92,666 88,719 3,876 71 

1919 99,818 94,349 5,407 62 

1920 128,298 • 119,931 8,274 93 

1921 137,054 127,306 9,651 97 

Note — Licenses sold in 1918 and for the first six months of 1919 were under the 
former fish and game department. Those recorded for 1920 and 1921 were sold under 
the present Division of Fish and Game. 

19—19980 



290 



Year Book 



TABULATION OF LICENSES 

The tabulation of licenses sold by counties and agents for 1921 dis- 
plays a great difference from the records of the preceding year. In 1920 
license sales increased in all counties of the state except six. In 1921 
forty-nine counties increased sales, and forty- three recorded losses. In 
the aggregate 8,756 more licenses were sold. Of the forty-nine coun- 
ties showing gains in sales, thirty-three were southern, and sixteen 
northern counties. The county making the greatest increase in sales 
was Steuben county, which recorded a gain of 2,501. The greatest loss 
recorded was by St. Joseph county, which fell off 878 in its annual sales. 
The following table shows the licenses sold in the several counties of the 
state and by agents for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1921: 




Chart showing number of fishing and hunting licenses sold for the four fiscal 
years. The Department assumed control on April 1, 1921 



Non- 

Resident 

Fishing 

18 

137 

1 

3 


Non- 
Resident 
Hunting 


24 

228 


1 


"4 




"5 
457 


ii 


2 

92 

2 

1 

213 


■3 


2 

71 

89 

288 

178 


"i 
"4 


89 

4 


1 
2 



Department of Conservation 21il 

LICENSES ISSUED BY COUNTIES AND AGENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

Resident 

Hunting 
COUNTY and Fishing 

Adams 646 

Allen 8,146 

Bartholomew 978 

Benton 174 

Blackford 783 

Boone : 662 

Brown 136 

Carroll 305 

Cass 2,712 

Clark 953 

Clay 1 ,582 

Clinton 939 

Crawford 152 

Daviess 1,051 

Dearborn 513 

Decatur : 759 

Dekalb 2,200 

Delaware 2,854 

Dubois 873 

Elkhart , 2,694 

Fayette 952 

Floyd 1,496 

Fountain 326 

Franklin 465 

Fulton 1,642 

Gibson : 1,247 

Grant 2,575 

Greene 1 , 655 

Hamilton 805 

Hancock 516 

Harrison 429 

Hendricks 458 

Henry 1 , 544 

Howard 2,886 

Huntington 2,211 

Jackson 888 

Jasper 453 

Jay 1,024 

Jefferson 636 

Jennmgs 298 

Johnson 532 

Knox 1 , 474 

Kosciusko 3,111 

Lagrange 938 

Lake 5, 174 

Laporte 2,237 

Lawrence 1 , 555 

Madison 3 , 747 

Marion 14,044 

Marshall 1,724 

Martin 232 

Miami 1,712 

Monroe 929 

Montgomery. 1 , 316 4 

Morgan 657 

Newton 233 49 

Noble 913 147 

Ohio 55 4 

Orange 671 2 

Owen 442 1 

Parke 622 11 

Perry 509 7 

Pike 682 3 

Porter 717 66 

Posey 914 



31 




4 






1 


9 






2 




3 


147 


"1 


445. 




168 


3 


.414 


37 


92 


3 


"e 




64 


3 


94 


3 




1 



292 Year Book 

Resident Non- Non- 
Hunting Resident Resident 
COUNTY and Fishing Fishing Hunting 

Pulaski 370 11 

Putnam 950 1 

Randolph 1,071 27 

Ripley 748 28 2 

Rush 596 1 

Scott 109 3 6 

Shelby 561 1 

Spencer 525 

Starke 543 60 2 

Steuben 3,871 989 1 

St. Joseph 1,894 20 

Sullivan 1,505 2 

Switzerland 60 2 

Tippecanoe 1 ,569 19 , . . 

Tipton 369 1 

Union 108 1 

Vanderburgh 3, 141 1 

Vermillion 904 134 

Vigo 4,051 4 

Wabash 1,481 .5 

Warren 214 5 

Warrick 912 

Washington 378 

Wayne 2,230 18 2 

Wells 771 10 

White 781 42 

Whitley 836 60 

Agents outside Marion County and in other States 3,504 

Total 127,306 9,651 97 



LICENSES ISSUED BY COUNTIES AND AGENTS SHOWING GAIN OR LOSS OVER FISCAL YEAR 192 

Fiscal 
COUNTY Year 

1920 

Adams 583 

Allen 7,463 

Bartholomew 999 

Benton 193 

Blackford 830 

Boone 1,081 

Brown , 50 

Carroll 358 

Cass 2,671 

Clark 1,278 

Clay 1,236 

Clinton 1,023 

Crawford 193 

Daviess 731 

Dearborn 765 

Decatur 718 

Dekalb 2,194 

Delaware 2,757 

Dubois 730 

Elkhart 2,912 

Fayette 1,096 

Floyd 1,399 

Fountain 556 

Franklin 446 

Fulton 1,510 

Gibson 1,420 

Grant 3,020 

Greene 1,529 

Hamilton 810 

Hancock 634 



Fiscal 






Year 


Gain 


Loss 


1921 






664 


81 




8,284 


821 




979 




20 


177 




16 


783 




47 


662 




419 


136 


86 




311 




47 


2,737 


66 




1,182 




96 


1,582 


346 




943 




80 


152 




41 


1,056 


325 




981 


216 


... 


761 


43 


... 


2,292 


98 




2,856 


99 




874 


144 




2,910 


... 


2 


954 




142 


1,568 


169 




415 




141 


753 


307 


... 


1,824 


314 




1,337 




83 


2,581 




439 


1,655 


126 




805 




5 


516 




18 



Department of Conservation 



Fiscal 

Year 

COUNTY 1920 

Harrison 585 

Hendricics 604 

Henry 1,786 

Howard 2,442 

Huntington 2,258 

Jackson 973 

Jasper 371 

Jay 1 , 179 

Jefferson 451 

Jennings 459 

Johnson 388 

Knox 1,356 

Kosciusko 3,635 

Lagrange 1 , 172 

Lake, 5,347 

Laporte 2,354 

Lawrence 1 , 251 

Madison 4,306 

Marion 12,718 

Marshall 1,881 

Martin 162 

Miami 1 , 827 

Monroe 998 

Montgomery 1,388 

Morgan 511 

Newton 256 

Noble 1,022 

Ohio 45 

Orange 397 

Owen 438 

Parke. . . . ." 466 

Perry 409 

Pike 310 

Porter 1,016 

Posey 660 

Pulaski 417 

Putnam 761 

Randolph 1,000 

Ripley 448 

Rush 578 

Scott 106 

Shelby 867 

Spencer 351 

Starke 598 

Steuben 2,360 

St. Joseph 2,792 

Sullivan 1,309 

Switzerland 33 

Tippecanoe 1 , 756 

Tipton 410 

Union 156 

Vanderburgh 2, 170 

Vermillion 1,100 

Vigo 3,355 

Wabash 1,415 

Warren 268 

Warrick 459 

Washington 472 

Wayne 2,321 

Wells 929 

White 987 

Whitley 706 

Agents 3,668 

Totals 128,298 

Net Gain— 8,756 



Fiscal 






Year 


Gain 


I^fl. 


1921 






436 




149 


458 




146 


1,544 




242 


2,892 


450 




2,242 




16 


892 




81 


454 


83 




1,033 




146 


638 


187 




301 




158 


532 


144 




1,622 


266 




3,556 




79 


1,109 




63 


6.625 


1,278 




2,332 




22 


1,555 


304 




3,753 




553 


14,111 


1,393 




1,821 




60 


233 


71 




1,720 




107 


929 




69 


1,320 




68 


657 


146 




282 


26 




1,060 


38 




59 


14 




673 


276 




443 


5 


... 


633 


167 




516 


107 




686 


376 




783 




233 


914 


254 


... 


381 




36 


951 


190 




1,098 


98 




778 


330 




597 


19 


... 


118 


12 




562 




305 


525 


174 




605 


7 




4,861 


2,501 


... 


1,914 




878 


1,507 


198 




62 


29 




1.588 




168 


370 




40 


109 




47 


3,142 


972 




1,038 




62 


4,055 


700 


... 


1,486 


71 




219 




49 


912 


453 




378 


... 


94 


2.250 




71 


781 




148 


823 




164 


896 


190 




3,504 




164 


137,054 


14,770 


6,014 



294 Year Book 

arrests and convictions 

In the fiscal year 1921 a total of 1,487 arrests were made of per- 
sons who violated the laws for the protection of fish, game, fur-bearing 
animals and birds. The number of persons convicted was 1,387; the 
number acquitted was 64, and the cases remaining untried number 36. 
The amount of fines and costs assessed against violators was $32,147.81. 
By comparing these figures with results in 1920, it will be noted that 
a gain of 66 was made in the number of arrests, 62 in convictions, 
and the number acquitted and left untried was almost the same. 

SALARIED AND NON-SALARIED GAME WARDENS 

The maximum number of game wardens employed in 1921 was 
never more than twenty-six. Only thirty-seven arrests and convictions 
were made by others than the regular wardens. Past experiences show 
that non-salaried officers seldom arrest anyone. Actual enforcement of 
the game and fish laws is brought about by salaried game wardens. 
Only sixteen of the arrests made in 1921 were made by the forty-five 
persons holding non-salaried commissions, and these were made by two 
who worked together. This shows their inactivity. In some respects the 
appointment of non-salaried wardens is a detriment to the department. 
Not being required to report weekly on their movements, as is required 
of all salaried wardens, the actual patroling they do can not be ascer- 
tained. Unless especially qualified and greatly interested in the enforce- 
ment of the game and fish laws, it would be best not to appoint such 
wardens. Simply having a badge to show authority and never exercising 
any, does the department no good. Mistakes of judgment, or a false 
arrest, may result in involving them and the department in trouble, and 
besides cause the department to lose the confidence of the people, which 
it now largely enjoys. The high plane upon which the present warden 
force has been established and conducted is a credit to the state. Every 
safeguard is being employed to keep it so. The dignity given the warden 
service by having the director of the department in immediate charge 
has much to do with its standard and efficiency. The standing of each 
man per arrests and convictions is compiled each month. Wardens who 
show no ability are discharged. The cost per man to the department is 
figured annually. This shows the relative worth of each warden. The 
following table shows the number of arrests and convictions made dur- 
ing the fiscal year, also the number of dismissed and pending cases, 
along with the total fines and costs assessed: 

1920 Arrests Convictions Acquitted Pending Fines and Costs 

October 130 127 3 $2,574 06 

November 302 291 9 2 6,071 05 

December 125 123 2 2,788 10 

1921 

January 59 48 11 1,265 95 

February 22 19 3 430 80 

March 64 55 3 6 1,273 65 

April 81 71 5 6 1,950 70 



Department of Conservation 



295 



May 151 142 6 8 3,220 ir, 

June 157 147 8 2 3,267 80 

July 132 126 3 3 3,943 35 

August 134 115 10 9 2,717 85 

September 130 123 1 6 2,644 05 

1.487 1.387 64 36 $32,147 81 

The average of convictions per arrests, 93 per cent. 

RECORD OF ARRESTS, CONVICTIONS AND AMOUNT OF FINES AND COSTS FOR 
THREE PRECEDING YEARS SHOVi^ING COMPARISONS 

Arrests Convictions Fines and Costs 

1918 369 347 $7,303 00 

1919 800 713 16,300 15 

1920 1,421 1,325 32,585 44 

1921 1.487 1.387 32,147 81 

Note — The year 1918 and first half of 1919 were under the former fish and game 
department. The years 1920 and 1921 were wholly under the Division of Fish and Game. 

The following is a list of offenses committed showing arrests, con- 
victions, cases dismissed and pending, and total fines assessed for fiscal 
year 1921: 



Ob'b'mSE 


Arrests 


Convictions 


Dismissed 


Pending 


Hunting and fishing without license 


434 

233 

195 

106 

60 

58 

58 

37 

32 

30 

29 

29 

26 

25 

20 

17 

17 

14 

11 

11 

8 

7 

6 

5 

4 

2 

2 

2 

2 


415 

226 

180 

105 

44 

57 

54 

37 

28 

28 

29 

22 

25 

24 

10 

17 

17 

14 

4 

11 

6 

6 

6 

5 

3 

2 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


19 
4 
9 

1 
6 


».'> 




3 


Having illegal seines in possession 


6 


Hunting on Sunday 

Seining fish unlawfully 




10 




1 


Having spears in possession 


1 


3 






Hunting without permission 


4 
2 








Taking bass in closed season 






1 


6 


Killing squirrels out of season 


1 




10 




Pursuing and killing deer 




Taking bluegills in closed season 










Taking fish illegally 






Dynj^miting fish 


3 


4 


Hunting in closed season 




Killing wild birds 


1 


1 


Spearing fish 


1 








Killing quail out of season 






Killing waterfowl in closed season 


1 








Taking fish with the hands 








1 




Trapping without written permission 








, 


Using floating devices 


















Killing squirrels within one-half mile State Park 










Using a hedge to catch fish 












Totals 


1,487 


1,387 


64 


36 







Fines and Costs in 1,387 cases $32,147 81 



296 Year Book 

fish cultural operations 
(Interest of the Public) 

The propagation of fish and the stocking of the waters has become 
the most popular branch of the division's work. The number of appli- 
cations for fish filled as reported by the superintendent of state fish 
hatcheries, shows an increase over the number filled the year before. 
The greatest demand continued to be for the black basses, with the blue- 
gill second in popularity. Four fish hatcheries are operated by the 
division. They are located in the following counties: At Tri-Lakes, in 
Whitley county; at Lake Wawasee, in Kosciusko county; at Bass Lake, 
in Starke county, and in Riverside Pa,rk at Indianapolis, in Marion 
county. The Tri-Lakes station has six ponds; Wawasee, fifteen; Bass 
Lake, eight, and the Riverside station, Indianapolis, has twenty-six. The 
kinds of fish reared during the season of 1921 were the two species of 
black bass, the bluegill, wall-eyed pike, crappie and yellow perch. All 
of the species named were hatched in ponds except the wall-eyed pike 
and the yellow perch, which were artificially hatched in jars. The eggs 
of the other species can not be secured or hatched in similar fashion. 

The rearing of fish by the division is a paying enterprise. The fish 
planted in 1920 were estimated as having a commercial value of $50,200. 
The number of fish reared was 771,266. During the past season the 
output was 10,836,857; their estimated value, $22,948.00; although the 
number of fish propagated was far larger their size made them less valu- 
able. In 1920 the cost of operating the hatcheries was $19,825.20; in 
1921, $21,301.08. The increased cost in 1921 was due to improvements 
made at the hatcheries. The number of fish reared at the various hatch- 
eries and an itemized list showing the distribution thereof are reported 
upon in later pages of this report by George Berg, superintendent of 
state fish hatcheries. 

STATE FAIR EXHIBIT 

The exhibit this division makes at the Indiana State Fair annually 
is one of the most attractive on the grounds. During the busy days 
at the fair several thousand people pass through the exhibit hourly. 
Live fish in glass tanks and game birds native to the state in cages are 
displayed. The purpose of the exhibit is to educate both young and 
old of the necessity of conserving and protecting the state's remaining 
wild life. 

MOTION PICTURES 

To give the general public a better knowledge of the duties this divi- 
sion has to fulfill, and how they are executed, moving pictures have been 
taken of two important branches of its work. These are fish propaga- 
tion and the work of the warden service. Seven reels of films are the 
property of the division. These are for free exhibition wherever and 
whenever they are wanted. Responsible clubs, or associations organized 
for wild life protection will be loaned the pictures without cost if assur- 
ance is given that they will be properly displayed and promptly re- 
turned. Preference will be given to clubs and associations affiliated with 
the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League. 



Defartment of Conservation 297 

fish, game and bird protective associations 

Indiana has taken the lead in fostering the organization of fish, 
game and bird protective associations. One of the duties of the fish 
and game division is to encourage and assist in the organization of such 
associations, such duties being imposed upon it by the act creating the 
department. This branch of the work is in charge of Andrew E. Bodine 
of Marion, Indiana, who carries the title of state organizer. One hun- 
dred and twenty-four clubs and associations are now listed in the office 
of the fish and game division. The state organizer keeps in direct touch 
with these organizations. In consequence, they exert a powerful influ- 
ence toward a better observance of the game and fish laws, especially 
in the localities where they exist. Organizations for the protection of 
fish, game and birds exist in eighty-eight of the ninety-two counties of 
the state, some counties having several clubs or associations. The com- 
bined membership of all organizations is estimated to be about twenty- 
five thousand. Almost without exception, these organizations interest 
themselves in stocking ponds, lakes and streams. They also add their 
influence in preventing stream pollution. The division has made it a 
policy to give preference to applications for fish sent in by organized 
bodies. A letter carrying information on wild life conservation is sent 
out monthly. Sportsmen have come to realize that the fish and game 
division needs more than financial support ; it needs also active and moral 
support. The wiser ones know that inasmuch as they help to decimate 
wild life, it becomes a part of their duty to see that it propagates and is 
not taken wastefully. The greedy game hog and fish pirate are slowly 
but surely becoming less in number. The bluifs and threats formerly 
made by violators have ceased to be numerous or to scare people. Vio- 
lators now know this, and the scare has been turned in the other direction. 
The report of the state organizer, covering his work in 1921, and a list 
of clubs and associations now existing in the state form a valuable part 
of this report. The state organizer for the department is also secretary 
of the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League. The league is recognized 
by the division of fish and game as the official state sportsmen's organ- 
ization. At a meeting of the league held in October, 1920, the division 
of fish and game took up matters with it pertaining to changes in the 
game and fish laws. During the legislative session which followed the 
league rendered valuable service in securing the passage of the new 
acts now on the statute books. 



NEW FISH AND GAME LAWS PASSED BY THE 1921 LEGISLATURE 

The legislature of 1921 enacted three new laws and amended two 
former acts for the protection of fish, game and fur-bearing animals. 
Two of ths new laws affect fishing and one regulates the harboring of 
ferrets. The new fish laws are a closed season on black bass and blue- 
gills from April 30th to June 16th, and one regulating ice fishing in 
the inland lakes. Amended laws were those regulating fishing with 
trot-lines and floating devices, and the law protecting fur-bearing ani- 
mals. 



298 Year Book 

COMMENT ON NEW LAWS PASSED 

Closed Season on Bass and Bluegills 

By passing the act providing for a closed season on both species 
of black bass and the bluegill, the legislature of 1921 showed great 
wisdom. It recognized the necessity of protecting fish during a time 
when protection is really needed, namely, during the spawning period. 
The important reproductive period for black bass and bluegills is be- 
tween April 80th and June 16th, dates set down as closed in the new law. 
Formerly during this period anglers were busy taking them off their 
beds, and there was no law to prosecute them for doing so. The object 
of the new law is to stop this unsportsmanlike and unnatural practice, 
and to see that the fish are allowed to reproduce themselves without 
molestation. The early spawning of black bass and bluegills which ex- 
pose themselves in spawning more than other game fish do, seldom 
amounts to much. When spawning early, females seldom deposit all of 
their eggs; this, added to the destruction caused by declining tempera- 
tures causes many nests to go for naught. Male bass leave their beds 
when the temperature drops below 50. As the season advances more 
and more eggs become ripe in the females and when deposited and finally 
hatched produce a far greater number of fish to the nest. Experience 
gained at the state fish hatcheries proves that the most important 
spawning time for black bass is in the early or middle part of May. 
Bluegills begin to spawn several weeks later. That the protection af- 
forded these fishes during their important spawning period has done 
tremendous good, is evidenced by the report of anglers who fish with 
live bait. Many of them state that in seining for bait they invariably 
find young bass in their seines. This tends to show that reproduction 
has taken place. While some of the seined fish may have been planted 
by the state, yet the bulk of them must have been produced in the stream 
itself through the spawning of parent fish inhabiting it. The spawning 
season of bass for the year 1921 will long be remembered as the best 
in a generation. Two years hence, when this year's hatch have grown 
to a lawful size, fishing for bass should be excellent. Being the most 
highly esteemed fish we have in Indiana waters, it is well to offer them 
every protection. Any attempt to repeal this law should be fought with 
vigor by all true sportsmen. The principle involved of affording pro- 
tection while spawning might well be applied to other valuable species 
also. 

FISHING THROUGH ICE 

The law restricting fishing through the ice in the inland lakes was 
passed to protect the fish in them from the spearer and netter. To 
apprehend such violators has been difficult, as they carried on their 
operations from within a house or shanty placed over holes. These 
obstructed a full view of their operations. The new law makes it unlaw- 
ful to place a house or shanty over a hole in the ice, or to fish within 
such a structure placed on the ice. It also restricts the number of holes 
one may fish through, two being the limit. No hole dare be larger than 
two and one-half feet in diameter, and one line with one hook attached 
may be used in each hole. Bass Lake, the only lake in the state in which 



Department of Conservation 299 

ice fishing is entirely prohibited, remains closed as formerly, the new 
law not affecting its status. This lake has no doubt been greatly bene- 
fited thereby, and similar protection to the other lakes would tend to 
better fishing in the spring and summer. Fish caught during the winter 
are seldom caught for sport. They are more frequently taken for meat 
or for commercial purposes. The new law will tend to reduce the num- 
ber of fish caught through the ice, and therefore be a benefit to those who 
fish when the weather is pleasant. The law is in the interests of fish 
conservation and should not be repealed as was done by former legis- 
lators some years ago. 

ELIMINATION OF TROT-LINES AND SET-LINES FROM LAKES AND THE DOING 
AWAY WITH FLOATING DEVICES 

Fishing with a trot-line or set-line in an inland lake was made 
unlawful but not eliminated from streams. It is the lazy man's style of 
fishing and often employed by persons who commercialize their catch. 
Like money loaned out at interest, a line of this kind works day and 
night. Doing away with them in lakes has saved thousands of blue- 
gills, the species most frequently caught. No real angler cares to catch 
fish with a trot-line. Their use in streams is still permitted, but one 
to a person is all that is allowed. No hooks less than a half inch, and no 
more than fifty of any kind dare be placed thereon. There is some 
reason for allowing trot-lines or set-lines in streams. Farmers have 
little time to fish with a pole and line if what they claim is true. A 
trot-line or set-line in a stream adjacent to a farmer's land will sup- 
ply him with plenty of fish. There is another reason for permitting trot- 
lines to be used in streams with some leniency. Streams are not always 
clear, nor in a condition to fish. Lakes usually are; therefore, a trot- 
line set in a lake is apt to catch fish more readily. 

The section of law permitting fifteen bottles or other floating devices 
in fishing was repealed, and fishing of this kind made unlawful. In 
this day and age no one should be allowed to fish with more than a small 
number of lines and hooks. Fishing with fifteen hooks, attached to 
bottles and other floating devices was the favorite sport of the fish hog 
and commercial fisherman at most of our lakes. The elimination of 
this style of fishing can not help from being beneficial. It has the 
effect of giving the legitimate fisherman who fishes with one or two 
fish rods or poles a chance to catch something. Catching fish by any 
method other than with pole and line is now unlawful in lakes. With 
fishing restricted to such a method the chances of a person catching 
something are vastly improved. 

NEW LAW REGULATING THE HARBORING OF FERRETS 

Under a law passed by the last legislature it was made unlawful 
for any person to harbor or have in his possession, any ferret or ferrets 
in this state, without procuring a permit therefor from the Department 
of Conservation. The law authorizes the department to issue permits 
under such regulations as in its discretion, it may make, and to charge 
and receive for such permit such fee as such regulations provide. The 



300 Year Book 

Conservation Commission has ruled that a fee of $10.00 be charged per- 
sons who harbor a single ferret, and a further fee of $5.00 for each 
additional one. The purpose of the act was to register all persons har- 
boring or possessing ferrets, thereby affording rabbits better protec- 
tion. The majority of rabbits hunted in the state are killed after being 
driven from their holes with ferrets. Game wardens found it difficult 
to apprehend violators under the ferret act making their use unlawful, 
but now that possession without permit is unlawful, far less hunting 
with ferrets is indulged in. No permit is issued by the division of 
fish and game unless the applicant signs a petition stating the exact 
purpose for which the ferret or ferrets are to be used, and such purpose 
must be of a lawful nature. Very few permits have been issued, which 
would tend to show their number has decreased. 

CHANGE^ IN THE FUR-BEARING LAWS 

Several changes were made in the fur-bearing laws which were 
greatly needed. These are of special interest to the men who hunt and 
trap fur-bearing animals. Very important changes were made in the 
opening and closing dates, the closed season now extending from Feb- 
ruary 10th to November 10th on all fur-bearing animals alike, except 
beaver and otter, which the legislature protected by a perpetual closed 
season. Mink and muskrat, which could formerly be taken from Novem- 
ber 1st to March 31st, cannot be taken now until November 10th, nor 
after February 10th. Raccoon, skunk, oppossum and fox, formerly pro- 
tected from February 2d to November 20th, can be taken ten days sooner 
and eight days later. The changes in dates were made to do away with 
the opportunity to violate the law which the former dates on mink and 
muskrats provided. By making the opening and closing dates the same 
on all, no excuse can be given for having a protected animal in possession 
after February 10th, or before November 10th. Under the present law 
each hide or fur unlawfully taken constitutes a separate offense and 
the person offending may be convicted for each animal, hide or fur 
unlawfully taken or held in possession. Under a new clause hides and 
furs unlawfully taken now become the property of the state. Clauses in 
the law were inserted giving the department the power to issue permits 
to persons desiring to hold animals lawfully taken in open season to 
hold them for breeding purposes, and requiring persons killing animals 
doing damage to property in closed season, to notify the department of 
the fact, so it may arrange for the disposition of the hide or fur. These 
clauses were inserted to do away with the incentive to kill animals out 
of season, or to take or kill them under the pretext that they were being 
held for breeding purposes, or killed while doing damage to or destroy- 
ing property. 

GAME EXPERIMENT STATION 

On November 1, 1919, a game experiment station was established 
on the farm of Frank G. Hasselman, at Bluff Mills, in Montgomery 
county, for the purpose of making experiments in game breeding. The 
main object was to secure data, based on actual experiments, for pub- 
lication. Such experiments have be§n inade, The object of the station 



Department of Conservation 



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has been met and the station closed on November 1, 1921. The experi- 
ments carried on by Mr. Hasselman, who was in charge of the work, 
proved less successful than was expected. Based on the state's experi- 
ence in this venture, I would say that game breeding is too expensive to 
be carried on by individuals, and far less practical than is generally 
supposed. 

PREVALENCE OF QUAIL AND OTHER GAME 

There has been a very noticeable increase in the number of quail 
in the state. Reports received by the division show that covies are 
found on farms formerly entirely absent of them. The birds seem to 
be everywhere, no part of the state showing any greater number than 
the other. The cause for the increase can be attributed to the better 
protection afforded by the farmer and the game wardens, and by favor- 
able weather conditions. Many persons claim there are more quail in 
the state this year than for twenty years. Rabbits and squirrels have 
also been plentiful this year. The possession of a ferret being unlawful 
except under a $10.00 permit, persons hunting rabbits with a ferret in 
violation of the law will be fewer in number. This will tend to better 
rabbit hunting in the future. 

COMMENT ON LICENSE SALES AND THE PRESENT LICENSE LAW 

Notwithstanding the fact that all honorably discharged soldiers, 
residents of the state, have been given the right and privilege to hunt 
and fish without a license, should they care to do so, the license sales 
of the division have increased. The gain made in such sales in the fiscal 
year 1921 was 8,756. The sales of licenses in the several counties of 
the state showed a great fluctuation from the sales recorded in the 
year previous. In 1920 only six counties showed losses. In the fiscal 
year just closed, forty-three counties recorded losses, yet the aggregate 
number sold exceeded that of the year before. Southern counties main- 
tained sales better than northern counties. 

Figuratively speaking, only four per cent, of the population of the 
state take out a license to hunt and fish. Wild animals, birds and fish 
roaming at large, here today and somewhere else tomorrow, are the 
property of no one in particular, but are owned collectively by all of the 
residents of the state. The people have, through their legislators, des- 
ignated the Department of Conservation to protect their resource. Inas- 
much as all residents have equal rights and ownership in it, they should 
likewise have equal privileges to take it. This is not the case, however, 
as far more persons hunt and fish without a license than buy them. 
Making the few pay and allowing the bulk to fish and hunt free, is not 
just. Paying a dollar for a license to hunt and fish is certainly little 
enough considering the amount and value of the wild life it permits the 
licensee to take. If one figures the number of fish, game and fur-bearing 
animals a person can kill each day in open season on the present dol- 
lar license, and computes their value for a year, it astonishes one to 
think that such liberal privileges would ever be extended. Present priv- 
ileges are not in the interest of conservation. If not curtailed soon, they 
are bound to lead to decimation. To conserve that which is still here, 



Department of Conservation 30f} 

the surplus propagated each year should be all that is taken. To take 
more reduces the brood stock. Therefore, to safeguard we must have 
smaller bag limits and longer closed seasons. Doubling the price of the 
present license and making them good only in the year of issue would be 
to the better interests of conservation, as it would cut down the number 
of persons who hunt and fish, and thereby help to preserve wild life. 
The reports of the superintendent of state fish hatcheries and the 
state organizer follow in later pages of this report. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF HATCHERIES 

The season of 1921 was a favorable one for the hatching of pike- 
perch and yellow perch in the early spring, but the extremely hot 
weather during and immediately following the spawning period for pond 
fishes proved disastrous to the eggs and fry of the basses, sunfish and 
crappie. Our output of the pond fishes was very limited as a result of 
this loss, and the distribution of these species was confined principally to 
public waters, especial consideration being given to the applications of 
fish and game protective associations. Three hundred ninety-nine appli- 
cations were filled during the season. 

The closing of our files on April 1st for applications to be filled dur- 
ing the past season has resulted in an accumulation of a large number of 
applications received after that date, which will be given first considera- 
tion in the distribution of 1922. This practice will be continued for 
the succeeding seasons, as it enables us to arrange our allotments to each 
applicant early in the season and eliminates the confusion caused by 
having to rearrange them to include those received later in the season. 

.During the period of extreme heat in June and July a number of 
fish were rescued from various waters, some of which were in danger of 
drying up while others were being drained for some purpose or other. 
Anyone having knowledge of conditions existing where fish are in danger 
of perishing through lack of water or other causes should notify the 
division of fish and game, so that steps may be taken to rescue them. 

In former years the pike-perch eggs which were hatched at our 
state hatcheries were obtained from the United States Bureau of Fish- 
eries, but it has become the policy of the bureau to hatch practically all 
of the pike-perch eggs at the government stations and use the fiy to 
stock the large lakes where commercial fishing is done. Therefore, we 
were obliged to secure our supply from some other source. Through 
the courtesy of the Michigan Fish Commission we were able to buy 
from the W. P. Kavanaugh Company of Bay City, Michigan, which 
operates a fleet of fishing vessels in Saginaw Bay, one hundred quarts 
of eggs from which was hatched 9,900,000 fry, which is almost a fifty- 
seven per cent, hatch. Pike-perch eggs run 175,000 to the quart, and 
a fifty per cent, hatch is usually considered very good. Pike-perch are 
almost always planted as fry, as it is generally considered a fish un- 
suited to pond rearing on account of its voracity. However, in an ex- 
periment tried this season at our Riverside hatchery, we were success- 
ful in rearing to the No. 2 and No. 3 fingerling stage, 1,325 of these 
fish. This is no great number, but the experiment proves that under 
suitable conditions these fish can be handled like other pond fish. 



804 Year Book 

We also obtained two hundred yellow perch spawners of the large 
type from the above named company. These fish were placed in ponds 
and allowed to spawn naturally. In addition to the eggs which were 
allowed to hatch in the ponds to be reared to fingerling fish, we collected 
a surplus of eggs which were hatched artificially and from which we 
planted 632,000 fry. 

Fish transferred from large waters to the confines of a small hatch- 
ing pond do not as a rule long survive the spawning season, and only 
a few are saved over the year. Consequently our supply of yellow 
perch spawners must be renewed each spring. We consider it a good 
policy to use fish for spawning purposes which are caught in waters 
some distance away from our own, as it furnishes a new strain of blood, 
the influence of which when intermingled with that of our native fishes 
tends to increase the size and vitality of the stock, especially so when 
the fish are of the larger type. Some of the yellow perch spawners we 
secured from Saginaw Bay last spring would weigh two pounds; the 
average weight of the lot would be about one pound. 

If possible we v^U get our supply of pike-perch eggs and yellow 
perch spawners from the same district again next year. 

The season of 1921 was the best in many years for the natural 
reproduction of fish in the open waters. Reports are received from all 
parts of the state that the streams and lakes are fairly teeming with 
young fish of all species. 

During the spawning period in April, May and June the streams 
were singularly free from freshets which is the principal disturbing 
force to fish nests, especially those of the game fish. While the tempera- 
ture was higher than usual during this period it remained fairly even, 
which is another factor of importance. The young fish were full of 
vitality when hatched and found a plentiful supply of food awaiting 
them. They took on growth rapidly and I believe that a larger per- 
centage of the young fish obtained the fingerling stage this year than is 
ordinarily the case. 

On June 19th I visited the Salamonie River in Huntington county 
and noticed that the young small-mouth bass, then about one and one- 
quarter inches long, were very numerous on all of the riffles. I counted 
over fifty of them on one small riffle, and no doubt there were that 
many more there hiding among the rocks that I did not see. I also 
saw this on a number of other streams and reports are that the con- 
dition is general, all of which means that we should have some mighty 
good fishing in the next few years. 

In the tables following is given a complete list of fish plants made 
from the state hatcheries, summaries of the fish reared at each station, 
a summary by species of the total number of fish reared at the state 
hatcheries, and summaries of the fish propagated and planted by the 
fish and game protective associations which operate hatcheries. Also 
a summary by species of the fish distributed in Indiana by the United 
States Bureau of Fisheries, and a summary by species of the total dis- 
tribution of fish by the United States Bureau of Fisjieries for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1921. 



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315 



SUMMARY OF DISTRIBUTION BY SPECIES 

Small-Mouth Black Bass — No. 1 Fingerlings 12,400 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 2 Fingerlings. 6,870 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 3 Fingerlings 1 ,800 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 4 Fingerlings '200 

21 270 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — Advanced Fry 6,000 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 1 Fingerlings * . . . 29 1 675 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 2 Fingerlings 4.5 [ .548 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 3 Fingerlings 19^33.5 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 4 Fingerlings {] 276 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 6 Fingerlings ' 100 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 7 Fingerlings. 300 

102,234 

Bluegills— No. 1 Fingerlings 119,400 

Bluegills— No. 2 Fingerlings 12,500 

Bluegills— No. 3 Fingerlings 100 

. 132,000 

Crappie — No. 1 Fingerlings 12,050 

Crappie — No. 2 Fingerlings 7 , 450 

Crappie — No. 3 Fingerlings 50 

19,550 

Rock Bass — No. 3 Fingerlings 200 

Pike-Perch— Fry 9,900,000 

Pike-Perch— No. 2 Fingerlings , 1 , 175 

Pike-Perch— No. 3 Fingerlings 150 

9,901,325 

Yellow Perch— Fry 632,000 

Yellow Perch— No. 1 Fingerlings 9,400 

Yellow Perch- No. 3 Fingerlings 10,350 

651,750 

Catfish — No. 1 Fingerlings 5,000 

Catfish— No. 3 Fingerlings 2,000 

7,000 

Carp— No. 3 Fingerlings 1 , 500 

Goldfish— Adults 28 

Total 10,836,857 



SUMMARY OF DISTRIBUTION, RIVERSIDE HATCHERY, 1921 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 1 Fingerlings 8, 175 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 2 Fingerlings 4 , 750 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 3 Fingerlings 6,625 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 4 Fingerlings 550 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 6 Fingerlings 100 

20,200 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 1 Fingerlings 12,400 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 2 Fingerlings ■ 3,525 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 3 Fingerlings 1,800 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 4 Fingerlings 200 

17,925 

Bluegills— No. 1 Fingerlings 11 , 900 

Bluegills— No. 2 Fingerlings 2,200 

Bluegills— No. 3 Fingerlings 100 

14.200 

Crappie — No. 1 Fingerlings '. 12,050 

Crappie — No. 2 Fingerlings 7, 150 

Crappie — No. 3 Fingerlings 50 

19,250 

Rock Bass— No. 3 Fingerlings 200 

Pike-Perch— Fry 1,400,000 

Pike-Perch— No. 2 Fingerlings 1 , 175 

Pike-Perch- No. 3 Fingerlings 150 

1,401,325 

Catfish— No. 1 Fingerlings 5,000 

Catfish— No. 3 Fingerlings 2,000 

7,000 

Carp — No. 2 Fingerlings 1 . 500 

Goldfish— Adults 28 

Total ■ 1,481.625 



816 Year Book 

summary of distribution, wawasee hatchery, 1921 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 2 Fingerlings 34,868 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 3 Fingerlings 5, 150 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 4 Fingerlings 726 

40,744 

Bluegills — No. 1 Fingerlings 107,500 

Bluegills— No. 2 Fingerlings." 10,300 

^ .„„... ■ 117,800 

Grappie — No. 2 Fingerlings 300 

Total 158,844 

SUMMARY OF DISTRIBUTION, BASS LAKE HATCHERY, 1921 

Small-Mouth Black Bass — No. 2 Fingerlings 3,345 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 1 Fingerlings 3,000 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 2 Fingerlings 740 

3,740 

Total 7,085 

SUMMARY OF DISTRIBUTION, TRI-LAKES HATCHERY, 1921 

Pike-Perch— Fry 8,500,000 

Yellow Perch— Fry 632,000 

Yellow Perch— No. 1 Fingerlings 9,400 

Yellow Perch— No. 3 Fingerlings 10,350 

651,750 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— Advanced Fry 6,000 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 1 Fingerlings 18,500 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 2 Fingerlings 5 , 190 

Large-Mouth Black Bass — No. 3 Fingerlings 7,560 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 7 Fingerlings 300 

37,550 

Total 9,189,300 

RESCUED FISH. 1921 

June 10— From the Hydraulic Canal between Metamora and Brookville in Franklin 
County- 
Suckers— 6-in. to IM-Ibs 16,500 

Small-Mouth Bass— 6-in. to 2-lb 11,000 

Large-Mouth Bass— J^-lb. to 23^-lb 200 

Sunfish 10 , 500 

Rock Bass— 3-in. to 8-in 7,000 

Carp— 3-in. to 6-lb 2,550 

Catfish— (100 channel cat) 2,100 

Crappie— 3-in to 6-in 600 

Total — 50,350 

Released in the Whitewater River. Work done by Amos and Hilton. 
July 18 — From overflow ponds near Petersburg, Pike County, and released in Clark's 

Station Pond— Fish consisted of Bass, Bluegills, Crappie and Catfish 60,000 

Work supervised by Wardens Dixon, Beloat and Crecelius, assisted by 
members of the Pike County Fish and Game Protective Association. 
July 20 — From the Grimes & Reed Pond, 1 mile east of New Waverly, Cass County. 
Released in a dredged ditch connecting with the Wabash River — Fish 
consisted of small Catfish, Green Sunfish, Golden Shiners and Mud Min- 
nows, number not estimated. Supervised by John H. Fleming. 
July 22 — From the W. C. Johnson Pond, near Cayuga, Vermillion County. Released 
in Raccoon Creek in Parke County, by members of the Parke County 
Fish and Game Association — ^Fish consisted of Large-Mouth Bass and 

Crappie 5,000 

Work supervised by Amos and Hilton. 

Total 106,350 

FISH PROPAGATED AND PLANTED BY THE MARION COUNTY FISH AND GAME PROTECTIVE 

ASSOCIATION. 1921 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 1 Fingerlings 19,000 

Small-Mouth Black Bass— No. 2 Fingerlings 1,700 

20,700 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 1 Fingerlings 16, 100 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 3 Fingerlings 3,500 

Large-Mouth Black Bass— No. 4 Fingerlings 100 

19,700 

Crappie — No. 1 Fingerlings 50 

Crappie— No. 2 Fingerlings 1,000 

1,050 

Bluegills— No. 2 Fingerlings 3,500 

Sunfish— No. 2 Fingerlings. 400 

Catfish— No. 4 Fingerlings 40,000 

Total 85,350 

Received from the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries— 

-Mouth Black Bass— No. 2 Fingerlings 2,000 

Grand Total 87,360 



Department of Conservation 



317 



FISH PROPAGATED AND PLANTED BY THE HAMILTON COUNTY FISH AND GAMR PROTECTIVE 

ASSOCIATION, 1921 



Small-Mouth Black Bass — Advanced Fry. . . 
Small-Mouth Black Bass — No. 3 Fingerings . 



1,000 
2,500 



All fish planted in Cicero Creek and White River in Hamilton County. 



3,500 



SUMMARY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF FISH IN INDIANA WATERS BY THE U. S. BUREAU OF 
FISHERIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1920. 

Catfish— Fingerlings 325 

Rainbow Trout— Fry 27,500 

Brook Trout— Fry 56,000 

Crappie — Fingerlings 50 

Small-Mouth Bass— Fingerlings and Fry 10,805 

Large-Mouth Bass — Fingerlings and Fry 52 , 775 

Sunfish — Fingerlings 4,410 

Rock Bass— Fingerlmgs 3,200 

Yellow Perch— Fingerlings 275 

Total 155 , 340 



UNITED STATES BUREAU OF FISHERIES 



SUMMARY, BY SPECIES, OF TOTAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND EGGS, FISCAL YEAR ENDED 

JUNE 30, 1920. 



Species 


Eggs 


Fry 


Fingerlings, 
Yearlings 
and Adults 


Total 


Catfish 






76,286,060 
6,999,310 
2,616,575 


76,286,060 

44,799,310 

177,201,575 

56,558,270 

115,000 

390,365,000 

166,205,000 

8,727,750 

50,038,270 

101,807,618 

307,200 

13,051,250 

4,118.035 

1,550,225 

1,641,905 

6,871,815 

4,059,800 

101 965 


Carp 




37,600,000 

174,585,000 

56,558,270 

115,000 

278,535,000 

76,005,000 

5,935,700 

1,265,770 

50,950,000 

307,200 

7,318,100 

173,200 

1,550,000 

1,054,525 

64,200 

2,021,500 


Buffalofish 




Shad 




Alewife 






Whitefish 


111,830,000 
90,200,000 




Lake herring (cisco) 






2,792,050 
37,505,500 
47,857,615 




11,267,000 
3,000,000 




Humpback salmon 


Chum salmon 




5,733,150 

3,053,235 

225 

90,275 

4,200,015 

1,315,700 

101,965 

800,785 

6,094,270 


Steelhead salmon 


891,600 




Landlocked salmon 


497,1,05 

2,607,600 

722,600 




Blackspotted trout 




Lake trout 


2,960,000 
821,400 


29,140,000 
3,100,285 
1,165,000 


32,900,785 

10,015,955 

1,165,000 

510,350 

29,955 

35,897,805 

1 564 965 


Brook trout 


Grayling 


Pikp ftTid pickftrpl 




510,350 

29,955 

35,897,805 

978,465 

41,375 

61,035 

14,650 

30,879,120 


Freshwater drum 






Crappie 






Large-Mouth bass (black) 




586,500 
171,000 


Small-Mouth bass (black) 




212,375 
61,035 
14,650 


Rock bass 










Siinfish 






30,879,120 
244,525,000 
163,206,150 


Pike perch 


89,625,000 


154,900,000 
162,590,100 


Yellow perch 


616,050 

1,500 

46,070 


White perch 




1 500 


White bass 






46,070 

16,474,000 

650,167,000 


Striped bass . 




16,474,000 

489,175,000 

557,685,000 

159,953,000 

1.60.3,080,000 


Cod 


166,992,666 




Pollock .... 




557 685 000 


Haddock 


i55,335,666 




315,288,000 


Flounder 




1 603 080 000 


Miscellaneous 


2,824,960 


2,824,960 










Total 


630,749,305 


3,872,216,350 


267,388,065 


4,770,355,720 





318 Year Book 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STATE ORGANIZER 



STATE ORGANIZATION 

A hundred and twenty-four associations have been formed in Indiana 
for the protection and propagation of fish, game and birds since organ- 
ization efforts were first begun. This r-epresents a great many thousands 
of citizens who have been interested in the conservation of natural re- 
sources. It is hard to estimate the influence upon public opinion of 
this array of organizations, established in every nook and corner of the 
state. 

Though all of these are not active at the present time, their pass- 
ing influence has been good, and much time and attention has been 
spent during the current year to re-organize such clubs as these where 
interest waned. New associations have been formed where local inter- 
est demanded it, but the greatest attention has been given to hold former 
clubs together and revive their memberships. Much visiting and speak- 
ing before club meetings by state officials has created unusual interest 
and had profitable results. Supt. George N. Mannfeld, division of fish 
and game, has advanced the organization work by speaking at public 
banquets, outings and meetings of associations. Credit is due Gustave 
J. T. Meyer, Indianapolis, for also devoting time and attention, making 
trips to speak at his own expense. 

A public meeting of local sportsmen and enthusiasts for conserva- 
tion is one of the best methods known for creating favorable public opin- 
ion. These meetings are often an interesting study in psychology. They 
afford an opportunity for citizens to express and exchange their views, 
and to learn. Every such meeting is worth while and justifies itself, 
whether a permanent organization results or not. 

In certain sections of the state situations have arisen which can 
best be ironed out by means of public meetings. Lake County, Indiana, 
is a case in point. The degree of lawlessness in that county and friction 
resulting therefrom, brought local newspapers into opposition with the 
State Department of Conservation. Misunderstanding was largely re- 
sponsible. An unusual organization program was started in that county. 
Today a very active protective organization exists at Hammond, and the 
local newspapers give that association all the favorable propaganda for 
protection that it desires. A fine banquet was held there last fall, with 
over three hundred seated guests, at which Supt. George N. Mann- 
feld delivered the main address. It was probably one of the largest 
"fish fry" banquets ever held by any similar club anywhere. 

To recount the clubs visited during the year would be to name most 
of the organizations in the state. When going in any direction, one 
or two stops have generally been made on the way, to attend meetings 
or see officials, and in this manner much ground has been covered. 

An effort is made to promote each club's welfare by having it join 
the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League, which is the official state 
organization, holding its meeting at Indianapolis in October of each year. 



Department of Conservation 319 

This state league works in conjunction with the State Department of 
Conservation for the best interests of the law-observing citizens. 

Many clubs have been helped in membership drives. Where the 
situation has demanded it, a complete reorganization has been effected. 
The following associations have been added to the list as new organiza- 
tions, or have been completely reorganized during the current year: 

Stone City Fish and Game Protective Association, Bedford. Organized January 5, 
1921. J. L. Irwin, president ; Edgar Hays, secretary. 

Wabash County Fish and Game Protective Association, Wabash. Organized March 
17, 1921. O. E. Hall, president ; Otto R. Faust, secretary. 

Eagle Creek Fish and Game Protective Association, Zionsville. Organized December 
3, 1920. E Harvey, president ; George Robey, secretary. 

Laporte County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Laporte. Organized 
October 1, 1920. John Shick, president; John Dilworth, secretary. 

Recreation Gun Club, Evansville. Organized November 1, 1920. F. P. Fuchs, 
president ; G. A. Beard, secretary. 

Charlestown Fish and Game Protective Association, Charlestown. Organized 
May 15, 1921. George H. D. Gibson, president ; James B. James, secretary. 

Peru Gun Club, Peru. Reorganized April 10, 1921. Frank Steutsman, president; 

A. J. Rhodes, secretary. 

Tippecanoe County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Tippecanoe. Or- 
ganized July 10, 1921. T. F. Ringle, secretary. 

Bartholomew County Fish and Game Protective Association, Columbus. Reorganized 
June 10, 1921. Dr. Cecil Smith, pi-esident ; Clarence Buxton, secretary. 

Evansville Casting Club, Evansville. Organized October 15, 1920. J. D. Welbnan, 
president ; G. A. Beard, secretary. 

Advance Fish and Game Protective Association, Advance. Organized April 20, 1921. 

B. O. Bmmert, secretary. 

Daviess County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Washington. Organized 
June 25, 1921. Chas. Willey, president ; C. C. Williams, secretary. 

Ripley County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Batesville. Organ- 
ized August 12, 1921. Fred Brummer, president ; Dr. E. B. Vincent, secretary. 

Calumet Conservation League, East Chicago. Reorganized January 10, 1921. Harry 

C. Gough, president ; Harry Roberts, secretary. 

Big Long Lake Cottagers' Association, Kendallville. Organized August 27, 1921. J. A. 
McDonald, president ; S. A. Enloe, Danville, secretary. 

Monroe County Fish and Game Protective Association, Bloomington. Organized Jxxne 
17, 1921. N. A. Jeffries, president ; M. L. Curts, secretary. 

Shelby County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Shelbyville. Re- 
organized May 2, 1921. Wm. B. Sleath, president ; Wilbur Pell, secretary. 

Greentown Fishing Club, Greentovrn. Organized November 1, 1920. J. N. DeLong, 
president; George Ball, secretary. 

Martin County Fish and Game Protective Association, Loogootee. Organized Sep- 
tember 15, 1921. William Carroll, president ; William Larkin, secretary. 

ACTIVE ORGANIZATIONS 

In addition to the above named and newly formed associations, there 
are many old and active clubs in the state. Among those that have 
made their influence known and have rendered especially active service 
in the cause of protection and propagation of fish and game, may be men- 
tioned the following associations: 

Bass Lake Business Men's Association, Knox. Frank Hay, president ; Irvin Chappie, 
secretary. 

Cass County Fish and Game Protective Association, Logansport. Isaac Oppenheimer, 
president; Hiram Hildebrandt, secretary.* 

Cedar Lake Protective Association, Lowell. Harry Lassen, Cedar Lake, president : 
Carl Gragff Lowell, secretary. 



320 Year Book 

Clay County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Brazil. Edward Newton, 
president ; Bernard Foulke, secretary. 

Decatur County Fish and Game Protective Association, Greensburg. Dr. D. W. 
Weaver, president ; E. J. Sims, secretary. 

Elkhart County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Goshen. Ray Deahl, 
president ; O. G. Landis, secretary. 

Eel River Fish and Game Protective Association, Denver, James H. Steller, presi- 
dent ; Carl Haines, secretary. 

Fayette County Fish and Game Association, Connersville. Philip LaRue, president ; 
D. M. Bottoms, secretary. 

Floyd County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Jeflfersonville. S. F. 
Zufall, president. 

Foot's Lake Pleasure Club, Evansville. Harvey Weber, president ; Chas. Jurgens, 
secretary. 

Gary Rod and Gun Club, Gary. Harry Hardenbrook, president. 

Gibson County Fish and Game Protective Association, Princeton. Maj. R. S. Man- 
ford, president ; T. J. Fox, secretary. 

Grant County Fish and Game Protective Association, Marion. W. A. Brown, presi- 
dent ; Ira Shildmeyer, secretary. 

Greentown Fishing Club, Greentown. J. N. DeLong, president ; Walter Ball, sec- 
retary. 

Hamilton County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Noblesville. R. R. 
Foland, president ; Walter Shirts, secretary. 

Hancock County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Greenfield. Rufus H. 
Temple, president ; Louis C. Heinrich, secretary. 

Hamilton Lake Fish and Game Protective Association, Hamilton. C. B. Dirrum, 
president ; G. L. Gnagy, secretary. 

Henry County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Newcastle. Sam Har- 
lan, president ; C. V. Wake, secretary. 

Huntington County Fish and Game Protective Association, Huntington. James K. 
Marks, president ; Albert E. Andrews, secretary. 

Indianapolis Gun Club, Indianapolis. Harry Stutz, president; C. L. Slinkard, sec- 
retary. 

Jackson County Fish and Game Protective Association, Seymour. C. L. Kessler, 
president ; T. R. Carter, secretary. 

Lake Bruce Protective Association, Kewanna. Harry Jenkins, president ; John Mur- 
phy, secretary. 

Lake James Cottagers' Association, Angola. Wm. Freuchtenicht, Fort Wayne, presi- 
dent ; A. H. Bunch, secretary. 

Lake County Fish and Game Protective Association, Hammond. Edward Rhode, 
president ; Wm. C. Greuner, secretary. 

Jay County Fish and Game Protective Association, Portland. Philip Waltz, presi- 
dent ; Charles Hutson, secretary. 

Jefferson County Fish and Game Protective Association, Madison. John C. Finch, 
president ; S. G. Boyd, secretary. 

Jennings County Fish and Game Protective Association, North Vernon. H. W. 
Miller, president ; A. E. Siener, secretary. 

Keego Angling Club, Indianapolis. A. J. Mannfeld, president ; Albert Steele, sec- 
retary. 

Laporte County Fish and Game Protective Association, Laporte. John Shick, presi- 
dent ; John Dil worth, secretary. 

Lawrence County Fish and Game Protective Association, Mitchell. Leonard Dalton, 
president ; A. N. Palmer, secretary. 

Lake Manitou Cottagers' Association, Rochester. F. F. Moore, president ; Earl Sis- 
son, secretary. 

Marion County Fish and Game Protective Association, Indianapolis. George R. 
Batchelor, president ; W. E. Roeder, secretary. 

Lake Maxinkuckee Conservation League, Culver. John P. Walter, president ; H. L. 
Coutzen, secretary. 

Montgomery County Fish and Game Protective Association, Crawfordsville. F. G. 
Hasselman, president ; R. R. Reynolds, secretary. 



Department of Conservation 321 

Northern Indiana Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Fort Wayne. Law- 
rence Koeneman, president ; R. J. Phillips, secretary. 

Perry County Rod and Gun Club, Tell City. U. B. Cummings, president; C. M. 
Cumesky, secretary 

Pike County Fish and Game Protective Association, Petersburg. Dr. Lee DeMotte, 
president ; H. E. Willis, secretary. 

Plainfield Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Plainfield. W. A. Rush ton, 
president ; Dr. LaRue Davis, secretary. 

Pluto Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, French Lick. O. B, Hancock, 
president ; Felix Roach, secretary. 

Putnam County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Greencastle. Ernest 
Stoner, president ; G. F. Long, secretary. 

Tippecanoe County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Lafayette. Paul 
Pyle, president ; Fred Dobelbower, secretary. 

Warsaw Fish and Game Association, Warsaw. N. E. Haymond, president ; John 
Sloane, secretary. 

Vigo County Fish, Game and Bird Protective Association, Terre Haute. R. C. Meis- 
ner, president ; E. T. Hulman, secretary. 

Wayne County Fish and Game Protective Association, Richmond. W. B. Kelley, 
president ; John Holliday, secretary, 

Wawasee Protective Association, Syracuse. Haines Egbert, president ; George L. 
Xanders, secretary. 

RESOLUTIONS SHOWING CO-OPERATION AND ENDORSEMENT OF THE INDIANA 
FISH, GAME AND FOREST LEAGUE 

At the annual meeting of the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League, 
held at the Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, October 27, 1921, the following 
resolutions were presented, endorsed and passed by the delegates in 
attendance by unanimous vote: 

RESOLUTIONS BY ORGANIZATIONS 

Resolutions presented by the Marion County Fish and Game Pro- 
tective Association of Indianapolis: 

1. Whereas, The present Division of Fish and Game, of the State Department of 
Conservation, has rendered the state especially fine service in protecting and preserving 
game and fish in the state ; and, 

Whereas, The Director of the Department, Mr. Richard Lieber, and George N. 
Mannfeld, the Superintendent of Fisheries and Game, have shown their fitness for the 
positions they relatively hold in managing the Fish and Game Division ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League go on record as endors- 
ing their work, and that of the Department, and that they be praised for their pains- 
taking labors in behalf of the conservation of wild life in this state. 

2. Whereas, The game warden service of the Division of Fish and Game, under 
the Department of Conservation, has shown such gieat eflSciency in apprehending vio- 
lators and bringing about observance of fish and game laws ; and. 

Whereas, The present funds of the Division seem sufficient to warrant more men 
on the warden force ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League favors the employment 
of such additional men on the warden force as the finances of the Division will allow, 
and that in the selection of wardens the high standard and qualified fitness of the men 
be left to the Conservation Commission and the Director of the Department of Conserva- 
tion, and that politics be not allowed to form a part in their selection, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be given to the public press. 

Resolutions presented by the Keego Angling Club of Indianapolis: 

1. Whereas, A movement has been set on foot to abolish the laws prohibiting Sun- 
day hunting, at the next session of the legislature; and, 

21—19980 



322 Year Book 

Whereas, This club believed that such a movement would, if successful, tend to 
cause serious trouble both to the farmer and sportsman ; and. 

Whereas, Such movement is not in the interests of the conservation of game in 
our state ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Keego Angling Club go on record as opposing any such change 
in any of our present laws affecting Sunday hunting. 

2. Whereas, It seems to be the intention of the Governor and Auditor of State, 
to sell lands along the Kankakee River belonging to the state, for the purpose of pay- 
ing certain assessments due ; and. 

Whereas, Said lands are of great value to the people for recreational purposes ; and, 

Whereas, Others have been assessed for ditching the river and have paid said 
assessments ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League use its influence with 
the Governor and Auditor, with the view of having them retain these lands, and that 
the legislature be appealed to at its next session to appropriate the required funds to 
pay the ditch assessments. 

Resolution adopted by the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League 
on recommendation of the resolutions committee: 

To the Members of the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League: 

The Resolutions Committee offers the following resolutions for your consideration 
and adoption: 

Whereas, There is a growing necessity for larger areas of public land which may 
be used for recreation purposes by the people, and which may be set aside for refuges 
for game and wild life ; and, 

Whereas, It is the object of the Department of Conservation of the State of In- 
diana to acquire land in the state for such purposes ; and. 

Whereas, The State of Indiana is fortunate in owning many thousand acres of 
land located in the vicinity of the Kankakee River which are of peculiar value for 
such purposes, and which it is proposed to sell to satisfy the costs of certain ditching 
projects; therefore, be it 

Resolved, by the Indiana Fish, Game and Forest League, in convention assembled, 
That the league favor the retention of said land by the state for the uses and pur- 
poses above mentioned, and that some other method be taken by which to raise funds 
with which to pay the cost of such ditching projects, thus preserving forever to the 
people that which once lost can never be replaced ; and, be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to the Governor of Indiana. 
Respectfully submitted, 

BY RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE, 

Harry C. Hbndrickson, Indianapolis. 
Walter Shirts, Noblesville. 
Rev. a. M. Hootman, Greencastle. 
Sam F. Zufall, New Albany. 

A motion was made and adopted that the above resolution be pre- 
sented in person to the Governor by the committee. 

GAME WARDEN SERVICE 

The game warden service is the police department of the division of 
fish and game. The director is the ex-officio head of this branch of 
service and thereby becomes in fact an officer working under the super- 
intendent of the division of fish and game, since that officer is responsible 
for the conduct of his division. 

The conservation law clearly defines the duties of the division chiefs 
as independent and responsible heads and it therefore must be plain that 
not even the director could take out or take over any part of this re- 



Department of Conservatio^t 323 

sponsibility. This law says that "He (the director) shall have charge 
of the fish and game deputies and wardens in the enforcement of the 
laws relating to fisheries and game. . . ." The work entails not only 
the closest co-operation with the policy of the division, but also a not in- 
considerable expense, and as the superintendent is responsible for both, 
the director in his capacity as chief of the service is in reality an assist- 
ant to the superintendent. 

In amplification of the report by the superintendent in whose office 
most of the records pertaining to law violations are kept, the following 
matter should be added. 

A total of 636 complaints was received and investigated. The fol- 
lowing table explains the disposition. 

complaints for fiscal YEA.R 1920-1921 



Month 


Received 

and 

Investigated 


Convicted 


Groundless 


Pollution 


Breeders 
License 


No. 
Results 


October 


24 
69 
32 
27 
.20 
58 
51 
98 
67 
87 
68 
35 


7 
38 

7 
17 

1 

18 
23 
17 
11 
24 
20 

4 


7 
5 
7 






10 








26 


December. 


2 




16 






10 


February 


4 
11 

9 
16 
10 
13 
13 

5 


1 
2 
7 
8 
7 
7 
2 
4 


2 


12 


March 


27 


Aoril 


2 
10 

6 
19 

9 

5 


10 


SC"'""":.""":: 


47 


June 


33 


July 


24 


August '..... 


24 




17 






Total 


. 636 


187 


100 


40 


53 


256 







COST OF OPERATING AUTOMOBILES 

As in the previous year careful account was kept of the expense 
of operating state owned machines. Each car has a service number, 
sealed hub odometers are used to obtain mileage. Weekly reports on 
mileage, fuel, oil and repairs are made, receipts must be taken besides 
and records of tires and inner tubes are kept at the office. The serial 
number of each is recorded with its exact location as to wheel and serv- 
ice car and replacements are made only by exchange of worn out parts. 
The following data is on ten department owned cars. 

Total Cost Per Mile 

Storage $915 16 $0.0057 

Supplies 3,010 86 .0187 

Repairs 1,093 82 .0068 

Tires 2,334 63 .0146 

Equipment 24 52 .0001 

Depreciation 2,013 29 .0125 

$9,392 28 $0.0583 

Miles traveled 161.063 

Cost per mile 0583 



324 



Year Book 




Department of Conservation 



825 



The following- is a list of standing of game wardens for the year 
1920-1921. 

STANDING OF GAME WARDENS FOR FISCAL YEAR, 1920-1921 



Name 



C.C. Miles... 
A. Gallion. . . . 
J.J. Bravy. .. 

F. Lapham 

A. D. Barber. . 

G. W. Wyatt. . 
R. Rohrabaugh 
G.T.Stansell. 
C.R.Gilpin... 
T. F. Butler. . . 
J.H.Randall.. 
W. Garrabrant . 

W. Hoemig 

P. Crecelius. . . 
C. E. Dixon. . . 
T.Beloat.... . 
J. Chamberlin. 

H.Walker 

C.N.Hardy... 
F. M.Ehlers... 
E, Click 

*C. Raeber 

J. Havel 

*A. Mauck 

*J. Stoneburner. 

*A. Tilton 

A. Vanderford. . 
R. D. Fleming. , 

A. Holstine 

O.Neal 

L. J. Amos 



Number 

of Months 

Service 



12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

n% 

IIH 
101^ 
12 
12 
12 
8 

12 
12 
12 
12 

7 
12 
10^ 

4 
12 

4 

4 

4 
103^ 
12 

2 

4 



Arrests 



96.92 
81.88 
78.14 
76.39 
75.50 
73.50 
67.05 
63.48 
61.00 
60.98 
59.98 
59.02 
58.92 
56.02 
55.62 
54.29 
50.55 
48.17 
33.00 
30.08 
29.02 
27.66 
27.34 
26.66 
25.25 
21.84 
21. -25 
13.42 
10.17 
4.34 
2.16 



Standing 

per 
Arrests 



Convic- 
tions 



77.66 
75.39 
71.25 
61.16 
70.99 
63.44 
57.97 
52.05 
56.48 
53.14 
46.03 
55.58 
54.02 
55.62 
54.29 
47.10 
46.25 
28.00 
29.02 
27.19 
27.66 
26.00 
26.66 
24.25 
19.50 
19.32 
13.42 
10.17 
3.34 
2.16 



Standing 

per 
Convic- 
tions 



Standing 
in Propor- 
tion to 
Months of 
Service 



Per Cent, 
of Convic- 
tions 
Made on 
Arrests 



97.81 
94.84 
96.49 
93.27 
81.00 
96.58 
94.61 
91.32 
85.32 
92.61 
88.60 
78.00 
94.34 
96.43 

100.00 

100.00 
93.11 
96.00 
84.85 
96.44 
90.37 

100.00 
95.09 

100.00 
96.00 
89.26 
90.91 

100.00 

100.00 
77.00 

100.00 



"NOTE — Those marked with an * no longer on regular force. 



In addition to the list of wardens given on page 286 the following 
men served as game wardens for the period given following their names. 

A. D. Mauck, October 1st to December 31st. 
Charles Raeber, October 1st to December 31st. 
James Stoneburner, October 1st to January 31st. 
Arthur Tilton, March 1st to June 80th. 

The failure of the fur market in the fall of 1920 was reflected in 
the comparatively small number of furs confiscated previous to the open- 
ing of the season, November 10th, although it should be borne in mind 
that an amendment by the recent legislature changed the date of the 
fur-bearing animal act for open season from the 20th of November to the 
10th of November. A total of 298 furs were confiscated. 

With a view of profiting from the experience of others and the 
hope to be of some service in turn to those who wish to keep in touch 
with the workings of game warden service in other states, a game 
warden service questionnaire was sent to all of the states in the union. 
The answers so received were tabulated and this tabulation is now in 
the hands of the various state officers for the purpose of checking ifp 
before final publication. 



826 Year Book 

At this time it may be interesting to review a few of the outstanding 
facts as revealed by this compilation. 

Game warden salaries are all the way from $300 a year (Georgia) 
to $3,000 a year (West Virginia). 

The total expense per warden in the more successful states aver- 
ages about $2,500 a year which is approximately the cost in Indiana. 

Percentage of convictions varies between 53% (Georgia) and 98% 
(New York). 

Indiana, with 93% registers in sixth place, as follows: New York, 
98%; Maine, 97.8%; New Jersey, 96.7%; Michigan, 94.8%; Massa- 
chusetts, 93.7%. 

Of the states low in percentage of convictions the miserable fee 
system may be held accountable. Georgia for instance has only three 
salaried wardens, but 160 non-salaried wardens who live off of fees. 
Their eagerness to collect fees apparently is in excess to the willingness 
of the court to allow them. 

Another low state is Connecticut with 65% of convictions, nine 
partly salaried wardens and ninety-one non-salaried wardens. 

Pennsylvania which lists 1,895 convictions has eighty-one salaried 
wardens and the astounding total of 850 non-salaried wardens. It would 
be interesting to know the number of arrests and thereby the percentage 
of convictions. 

Of the five states exceeding Indiana, New York does not recognize 
the fee system; Maine does; New Jersey pays $5 to $10 to the non- 
salaried wardens per conviction; Michigan allows constable fee and 
Massachusetts witness fee. 

All cases listed for Indiana were made by the salaried wardens with 
the exception of 37 cases, of which 16 were made by two non-salaried 
wardens and the rest by constables or other peace officers. 

The number of convictions per warden in the different states ranges 
from 1.1 case in Virginia or 3 cases in Maine, to 55.4 cases in Indiana. 
The nearest approach to Indiana is Connecticut with 32.3 convictions, 
31 in New York; 25.6 in Kentucky; 25.9 in New Jersey, 25.6 in Iowa; 
23.4 in Pennsylvania; 22.6 in Michigan. Eleven states are under 20, 
all others under 10. 

Another interesting column reveals the cost per conviction which 
cost is arrived at by dividing the number of convictions into the total 
spent for warden service. It should be understood that these figures are 
merely comparative since the doubtful citizen will inamediately realize 
that the value of a warden does not exclusively or even pre-eminently de- 
pend on his ability to catch violators. Figured on the above stated basis 
this cost varies from $39.58 in Connecticut to $671.04 in Missouri, the 
latter state having 25 salaried wardens, 110 convictions, 4.4 convictions 
per warden, at a total cost of $73,814.68. In this case (Missouri), the 
extremely low average of convictions obtained raises the cost out of all 
proportion, but figures of $200 and $300 are in nowise rare. It costs 
Maine $204.62, Vermont $302.10, Massachusetts $282.50, Virginia $266.66, 
North Dakota even $405.30. The cost in Indiana is $45.80, or the second 
lowest among all the states. Above it, but below one hundred dollars, 



Department of Conservation 827 

appear in order, Texas $70.72, Tennessee $77.41, New York $79.51, Ken- 
tucky $84.63, Michigan $94.10, and New Jersey $95.64. 

The totals spent for warden service vary from the ridiculous sum 
of $2,000 in Kansas per annum, to $303,900.22 in Pennsylvania, and 
$327,200 in New York. Indiana expended $63,528.31. Among its neigh- 
bors Kentucky spent $22,426.38. Ohio $188,411.05, Michigan $212,781.57, 
and Illinois $190,000. 

The figures above given are from forty-one out of forty-eight states. 
One state (Nevada) reports "game warden office abolished," and 
another (Mississippi) reports "no game wardens." No answer so far 
could be obtained from seven states, viz.: North Carolina, Florida, Ar- 
kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, South Dakota, and Colorado. 

In the comparison with the entire country we thus find that Indiana 
has advanced to a most enviable position. Three years ago under polit- 
ical administration twenty-nine wardens made 347 convictions, or an 
average of twelve convictions per warden. On the basis of the present 
tabulation it would have given us seventeenth place. Instead of that 
we are in the lead by 60% over the second highest state. 

Still better service can.be had if it is clearly recognized by all con- 
cerned that the game warden service is a police department and that 
any police department, in order to be quick, alert, thoroughly honest, 
dependable and economical must only know one superior above it, and 
that superior aside from other necessary qualifications must be able to 
keep his department strictly out of politics. 



328 



Year Book 



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330 Year Book 

REPORT OF DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



ORGANIZATION 

W. K. HATT, State Engineer. 

M. J. STINCHFIELD, Jr., Assistant State Engineer. 

J. C. DIGGS, Sanitary Engineer. 

K. E. McCONNAUGHAY, Field Engineer and Draftsman. 

ADDA RINKER, Stenographer, 

FIELD CORPS FOR 1921 

K. E. McCONNAUGHAY, In Charge. 
D. L. WARREN, Instrumentman. 
J. D. WHICKER, Instrumentman. 

C. M. DRAPER, Instrumentman. 
L. D. ATKINS, Rodman. 

H. HAAS, Rodman. 

McKIM C. COPELAND, Rodman. 

D. L. CRABTREE, Rodman. 
D. DOGGETT, Rodman. 

H. A. ASPERGER, Rodman. 
W. D. PERRIN, Rodman. 

Created by an act of the 1921 legislature, the Division of Engineering 
is now a well established arm of the Department of Conservation. While 
acting primarily as a service division for the remainder of the Depart- 
ment, this unit has its particular function in connection with drainage 
matters throughout the state. 

Through a plan of co-operation with Purdue University, the Divi- 
sion may, upon request, secure the services of members of the Purdue 
engineering faculty and the use of its laboratories. The head of the 
School of Civil Engineering acts as State Engineer without additional 
compensation from the state, the routine work of the Division being car- 
ried on by the Assistant State Engineer, who devotes his entire time to 
the Division. This arrangement, it is believed, has proved satisfactory. 

DRAINAGE 

In creating the Division of Engineering the legislature assigned to 
the Department of Conservation numerous additional duties relative to 
the drainage and reclamation of land. Briefly stated, the Department is 
authorized, first, to collect and disseminate data and information of 
drainage in general, and second, upon request from interested parties to 
direct the State Engineer to act in an advisory capacity on local drain- 
age projects. Provision was also made that the clerk or auditor of the 
county, in which a petition for drainage is filed, shall notify the Depart- 
ment of Conservation of the court order relative to the organization of 
the district. The opportunity is thus given the Conservation Commission 
to pass upon the merits of any drainage project, and to work toward the 
co-ordination and betterment of our present drainage system in Indiana. 



Department of Conservation 331 

Pursuant to the first duty as stated above, the Division has under- 
taken a drainage survey of the state. All available data regarding the 
location, area, date of organization, character of project, cost, land val- 
ues, etc., will be compiled and a map of the state prepared which will 
show the location and extent of every drainage project upon which in- 
formation may be obtained. Preliminary work for this survey is now 
under way, but it is apparent that such a large undertaking must nec- 
essarily extend over a considerable period of time. It is hoped that con- 
siderable technical data of value may be collected in connection with this 
survey. 

Due, no doubt, to unfamiliarity with the recent legislation making 
the State Engineer available for consultation on drainage enterprises, 
no requests were received until late in the fiscal year, for co-operation 
with local officers. During the last month of the year, however, several 
such requests were received and investigations of the projects are now 
being made. It is apparent that the services of the Division will be in 
considerable demand henceforth. 

ABATEMENT OF STREAM POLLUTION 

Beginning August 1st, following the employment of a sanitary engi- 
neer by the Division, an active campaign was carried on for the abate- 
ment of stream pollution by the industrial plants of the state. During 
the remaining two months of the year principal effort was expended in 
the investigation of cases of pollution brought about by the canning 
factories of the state. This was done for the reason that many plants 
of this class operate but a brief season of four to six weeks, producing 
in many instances large volumes of organic waste. They obviously must 
be studied when operating, even though it is illogical to consider indi- 
vidual instances prior to a careful survey of the entire stream situation. 

In taking up the individual cases of stream pollution with the own- 
ers of the industries, no hard and fast regulations were applied. Offi- 
cials of plants contributing wastes sufficient in volume and of a char- 
acter detrimental to the streams were made to feel that they were deal- 
ing with a state department which wishes to co-operate with the indus- 
tries. General advice regarding the possibility of the treatment of the 
particular waste in question was given, but it was not the intention to 
design treament plants, this phase of the question being left to con- 
sulting waste disposal engineers. 

Many cases of stream pollution by Indiana industries were found to 
be due to carelessness on the part of plant superintendents who failed 
to insist that as careful attention be devoted to waste treatment devices 
as was required of other factory processes. In a number of instances 
merely pointing out to plant officials the damage produced when their 
untreated wastes were discharged into the streams resulted in the oper- 
ation of the plant in a manner that objectionable wastes were no longer 
produced. 

Obviously the ideal solution of pollution problems would include the 
working out of processes for the recovery of valuable by-products now 
discharged through plant sewers. In one particular instance this has 



332 



Year Book 



been possible. Factory processes installed to eliminate the waste from a 
large beet sugar factory will, it is believed, not only prevent the usual 
annual pollution of a river for a twenty-five mile course, but will result 
in the recovery of five to ten tons of sugar per day during a campaign 
of ninety to one hundred days. 

The following chart summarizes the stream pollution investigations: 



Stream 


Nature of 
Investigation 


Establishment 
Producing Waste 


City or 
Town 


Brandywine Cresk 


Rendering plant waste 


Hancock Fertilizer Co 


Greenfield 


McCuIlough Park 

White River 






Muncie 


Iron and acid waste 


Indiana Steel and Wire Co. ... 


Muncie 






T. H. Hart Paper Co 


Albany 


St. Mary's River 


Beet sugar waste 


HoUand-St. Louis Sugar Co 


Arcadia 


Cicero Creek 


Oil waste 






Pleasant Run . . . 


Canning factory waste 


Sears & Nichols 


Greenwood 


Cicero Creek 




Swine Breeders' Pure Serum Co 

Polk Sanitary Milk Co 




Cons Creek 


Milk waste 


Waldron 


Eagle Creek 






Zionsville 


Blue River 


Strawboard waste 


American Paper Products Co 


Carthage 




Tomato and corn waste 

Mill pond levels 


Tipton 


Deep River 


Roper & Brown . 


Hobart 


St. Joseph River 


N. I. Gas and Electric Co 


South Bend 


Dewey Creek . . . 


Gas waste 


Greencastle Gas Co 


Greencastle 


Blue River 




Edinburg Syrup and Refining Co. . . . 
Sears & Nichols Co 


Edinburg 


Camp Creek 


Tomato waste 


Dupont 


Cool Creek 






Westfield 


Little Blue River 


Corn waste 


Fame Canning Co. 


Shelbyville 


Cons Creek 




E. G. Reece Canning Co 


Waldron 


Back Creek 


Tomato waste 


Snider Preserve Co 


Fairmount 


Gravel Pit 






Indianapolis 











PROGRAM FOR STREAM POLLUTION WORK 

For the accomplishment of genei al improvement of the waters of 
the state, it is necessary that a broad program be outlined and that the 
work done from year to year be directed toward carrying out this pro- 
gram. 

(1) Investigations of cases of stream pollution and studies of methods for waste 
treatment. 

(2) Collection of data regarding discharge of vi^aste into streams. 

(3) Collection of data regarding waste treatment plants in Indiana. 

(4) Compilation of general information regarding waste treatment as practiced in 
other states. 

(5) Studies of effect of industrial wastes on fish. 

(6) Studies of Indiana waters and the effect of sewage wastes. A suitable labora- 
tory is essential for (5) and (6). 

(7) Dissemination of information to Indiana industries. 



LAKE LEVELS 

The maintenance and perpetuation of our Indiana lakes present 
many difficulties. In many cases the preservation of an existing lake 
level is seriously threatened by local drainage projects, some good, some 
very questionable. Investigations of such projects and of proposals to 
maintain the level of a lake by the construction of a dam across its 
outlet constitute a large part of the work of this division. 

The Leonard Act of the last legislature which is an amendment to 
the Acts of 1905 protecting fresh water lakes in Indiana, provides a 



Department of Conservation 333 

means of prevention when new ditch construction threatens to lower 
the level of one of our lakes, but whether this law, which prohibits any 
ditch construction within 160 rods of a lake, and any alteration in its 
outlet within 240 rods, is applicable to reconstruction and clean-out 
enterprises, is a matter still to receive precedent from our courts. Two 
such cases came to the attention of the Division during the past year, 
but because there was some doubt as to the application of the act pro- 
tecting fresh water lakes, and for the reason that proceedings had 
progressed so far as to the award of contracts, construction having 
started in one instance, no legal action was taken to prevent the lower- 
ing of the lakes. Two more recent cases are still under investigation, 
one of which threatens to lower the waters of Lake Wawasee in Kos- 
ciusko County, the largest lake in Indiana. 

The other phase of the lake level question, relative to dams thrown 
across the outlet, is the simplest solution of maintaining the water at 
its normal height. In most cases this can be done at a very small cost 
and proves very satisfactory, the Department and land owners co-oper- 
ating, the former furnishing engineering advice and the owners bearing 
the expense of construction. Once the dam is in, the Department of < 
Conservation exercises its jurisdiction in maintaining the lake at the 
established level. 

SURVEYS AND MAPS 

When this Division was organized one of the most apparent needs 
of the Conservation Commission was a series of complete topographic 
maps of the state parks. No maps of real value were then in existence, 
and the intelligent development of these valuable tracts was most im- 
possible. The organization of a field corps was immediately undertaken. 
The co-operation of Purdue University was solicited and the School of 
Civil Engineering loaned to the Division surveying equipment, approxi- 
mating $1,500 in value. With their help a field corps of seven men was 
secured and this party started the work on June 13, 1921. 

As it was planned to start several new improvements at Turkey Run ' 
Park during the summer, this was the first tract to be mapped. The 
survey was conducted with great accuracy, having in mind a map to 
a scale of 100 feet=l inch, with a contour interval of two feet. The 
survey included not only the 470 acres of park land, but a 
considerable amount of the territory in the vicinity, probably 700 acres 
in all. The work was completed on August 27th, and considering the 
rough and wooded character of the country, and the accuracy demanded, 
this is close to record time. Of this period probably two weeks were 
spent on special surveys in connection with various park improvements. 
Mapping was carried on as the work progressed and with the completion 
of the field work topographic sheets of any portion of the park were 
available. The compilation of those sheets into one map will be done 
during winter months. 

On finishing the Turkey Run survey the field corps was transferred 
to Clifty Falls Park at Madison, Indiana. Work here Was somewhat 
delayed as several members of the corps returned to Purdue to resume 
their college work. As soon as possible these vacancies were filled and 



334 Year Book 

it is probable that the work will be completed by November 1st. Topo- 
graphic work at Vinegar Mills and McCormick's Creek Canyon will then 
be undertaken. 

The demand for the Division's services on surveys has been greater 
than could be cared for while our park surveys are under way. A re- 
quest from the Division of Geology for the establishment of a number 
of bench marks between Bloomington and Columbus, Indiana, was com- 
plied with, and the work completed during the month of May. Other 
work, particularly those cases which involve state ownership of lands 
lying within the meander lines of fresh water lakes, has of necessity been 
postponed. 

PLANS, ESTIMATES AND CONSTRUCTION 

During the year the Division has prepared plans and estimates for 
two proposed improvements at Turkey Run Park, namely, a gravel road 
through the recently acquired park land ard a wooden highway trestle 
across Newby Gulch, near one end of the road. Work on the road has 
not yet been started, but the construction of the trestle at this writing 
is well under way. The site of this structure, which spans a gulch some 
140 feet wide and 45 feet deep, with solid rock bearings on both sides, 
is an ideal location for a concrete arch, but the cost of such a bridge, 
being estimated in the neighborhood of $17,000, was at this time pro- 
hibitive. The framed trestle which was suggested and designed by the 
Division, has an estimated cost of $2,885 and should have a life of from 
ten to fifteen years. With the passing of this structure the Department 
should be in a position to place a permanent structure on this site. At- 
tention is directed to the fact that the survey, design and construction 
of this trestle has been accomplished entirely within the personnel of 
the Department of Conservation, the survey, design, and supervision of 
construction being a function of the Division of Engineering, while actual 
construction is being carried on under the skillful direction of R. P. 
Luke, Superintendent of State Parks, 

The Division has also acted in an advisory capacity regarding water 
supply features at the various parks and hatcheries. An extensive sur- 
vey of conditions of water supply and sewage disposal at Turkey Run 
Park with view to recommending some definite means of improvement 
of these features and including an estimate of the cost of the same is 
now under way. 

OFFICE ROUTINE 

The Assistant Engineer spends considerable time answering letters 
requesting information, holding conferences in regard to various phases; 
of the work of the Division, and in collecting publications and data of 
an engineering nature. Correspondence relative to stream pollution in- 
vestigations is handled by the sanitary engineer. Further time is taken 
up with the preparation of reports and clerical work. Following is a 
mailing record of the Division since its conception: 

Incoming mail, first class 203 

Incoming mail, other classes 25 

Outgoing mail, first class , » 501 

Outgoing mail, other clas.ses »», ^ ,,,.... ...,.,,,,,,,, 3 



Department of Conservation 335 

recommendations 

Following are a few recommendations for the consideration of the 
commission : 

(1) This Division is of the opinion that the Leonard Bill of the 
recent legislature, in regard to the drainage of fresh water lakes, imposes 
too stringent restrictions as to the proximity of drains to lakes. In the 
majority of cases the provisions may prove none too ample, but there 
are some cases where a drain closer than 160 rods to a lake, or where 
alterations in an outlet v^rithin 240 rods, would cause no lowering of 
the water level, and would open many acres to cultivation, besides im- 
proving the immediate surroundings of some of our best lakes. In many 
cases ditches could be carried very close to a lake and the level still 
maintained by means of a dam across the outlet. It is suggested that 
the power to grant permits for such projects might well be entrusted 
to the Department of Conservation, and that the next legislature be 
requested to modify the law to this extent. , 

(2) The Temple Bill H. R. 5230, now pending in Congress, and pro- 
viding for the rapid completion of the topographic survey, is a measure 
worthy of the entire support of the Commission. The value of a topo- 
graphic map of Indiana to the various state departments is untold, and 
it is hoped that the Commission will lend weight not only in securing the 
passage of the Temple Bill, but in securing the necessary appropriation 
from the Indiana legislature that will assure an immediate completion 
of the Indiana quadrangles. 



REPORT OF THE INFORMATION SERVICE 



By Charles H. Parrish, In Charge 

Pointing out to the people of Indiana' the need of conservation and 
how much may be accomplished along diversified lines through the six 
co-ordinated divisions of the State Department of Conservation, is one 
of the duties of the information service. In this particular duty the 
service bureau reflects the actual work of the main divisions, director 
and the commission in that after results are accomplished, or experi- 
ments preliminary to accomplishments are well advanced, this informa- 
tion is disseminated to the people of this commonwealth through the 
greatest of all publicity mediums — the press. 

NUMEROUS STORIES DEVELOP WITHIN DEPARTMENT 

It is but natural that within so complete an organization and where 
there is much activity toward "Good Housekeeping" for the state, there 
should develop many, many stories of unusual news value which it is im- 
portant the people of the state be cognizant. In brief there are news 
stories constantly arising around such subjects as mineral resources, oil. 



336 Year Book 

gas and shale, limestone, geological survey, paleontology, economic 
geology, plant diseases, insect pests, apiaries, nursery stock, pathology, 
state forests, reforestation, tree nursery, wood lots, land classification, 
state parks, navigable streams, lakes, historic places, mineral deposits on 
state lands, fish and game, propagation, song and game birds, fur-bear- 
ing animals, game experiment station, protective associations, engineer- 
ing surveys and maps, tests of materials, stream pollution, water power 
and canals, drainage, state topographic survey, warden service, and the 
like. 

On the subjects dealt with, Department of Conservation heads take 
the position that they are merely custodians. Through special labors 
within the various divisions the way is pointed out to a better and more 
profitable utilization of our great natural resources. Again, divisions 
often engage in the perpetuation and propagation of those renewable 
resources which, through selfish motives or perchance ignorance, have 
been squandered. 

* Because the people of Indiana own all the state's natural resources 
and, because it is their duty as citizens to take personal interest in their 
government, the information service was created and charged with the 
duty of apprising them of complete operations of this branch of state 
government functioning to conserve the basic wealth of the common- 
wealth. 

PRESS OUR BEST FRIEND 

In this particular endeavor our chief ally is the press of the state 
and as a result of the splendid co-operation of newspapers, conservation 
is today one of the best known and most widely discussed subjects of 
our government. 

Essentially constructive and ever alert to things best for the state 
in which they operate, newspapers are aware of the potentialities of 
conservation. Editors are cognizant that Indiana possesses vast sources 
of wealth, some of which have only been meagerly drawn upon. They 
also know that some of these resources were squandered and need re- 
building. Therefore they, wi'thout a dissenting voice, stand solidly be- 
hind the information service in its efforts to advertise Indiana not only 
to its own people, but the country at large. 

The information service functions at a minimum cost. Its useful- 
ness is attested in the augmented interest the public now manifests 
toward conservation compared to a rather lethargic attitude only two 
short years ago. Newspapers are treated equitably in the matter of 
news dissemination. It is indeed gratifying to note that the press re- 
gards this service as one of common good, and is co-operative to a com- 
mon end. 

DEPARTMENT SEEKS CO-OPERATION OF ALL 

The state Department of Conservation knows that it needs the 
co-operation of the people generally in order to reach that goal sought. 
The information service via the press is the medium by which an often 
dormant public attitude may be aroused into decisive action. Had the 



Department of Conservation 337 

work of the Conservation Department remained buried in office files, it 
is problematical if today there would be a well advanced movement 
toward reforestation, state-owned forest lands, additional state parks and 
recreational centers, use of certain mineral resources, augmented inter- 
est in wild life and aquatic conservation, and a multitude of other things 
in which this organization zealously strives in order that Hoosiers may 
derive the most from a God-given heritage. 

A FEW things the BUREAU DOES 

Additional work of the information service is to answer inquiries 
regarding the best and most primitive places in the state for camping 
parties, week-end parties at state parks where modern conveniences are 
available, roads leading thereto, scenic and historic places of interest in 
the entire state, prepare special stories for editors desiring a feature 
on some subject dealing with Indiana's natural resources, inspire the 
people to the need of drawing judiciously upon their native wealth and, 
in fact, the duties are numerous and wide and of varying character. 

Citing a single case of what develops in the department, attention 
is called to the recent alarm prevalent in this state over the reported 
presence in Ohio within six miles of the state line of the dread Europeon 
corn borer. Erroneous reports to the Federal Horticultural Board that 
the pest would migrate to Indiana shortly, led Washington authorities 
to deem it best to quarantine the Hoosier com crop. Such procedure 
had it gone into effect would have spelled at the most conservative esti- 
mate a loss of $15,000,000 to the state's corn crop this year, not consid- 
ering the inevitable depreciation of land values. 

Mr. Wallace, State Entomologist for the Department of Conserva- 
tion, after investigation learned the borer was sixty instead of six miles 
from the Indiana line, and that it would be unfair and unjust to quaran- 
tine Indiana account of this. He with others, namely, representatives of 
the farmers' federations and the grain dealers' association, convinced 
federal authorities this course was best and that a quarantine at this 
time was unnecessary, but would likely prove calamitous. News of 
the action of the board was sent to three hundred Indiana newspapers 
through the information service and in a remarkably short time the 
European corn borer scare subsided. It is futile to think this news could 
have gained such widespread publicity in ^o short a time in any other 
way or by any other vehicle. Again, when there is an outbreak of any 
insect pest or invasion, this bureau upon receipt of the news, dissem- 
inates it throughout the state together with recommendations for control 
and eradication made by the State Entomologist. The result is the out- 
break is soon controlled at point of development and interests elsewhere 
in the state are protected. 

CREATES NEWS STORIES ON CONSTRUCTIVE PROGRAM 

The division of fish and game is engaged in a great campaign of 
propagating baby fish for planting in public waters. Appeals are made 
via the information service for parent fish for hatchery uses. Stories 

22—19980 



338 Year Book 

sent out from time to time concerning the industry, method of function- 
ing, and activity of wardens warring on violators of both fish and game 
laws, all tend to stimulate and arouse additional interest in this partic- 
ular branch of conservation. 

Indiana rather late sees the wisdom of perpetuating its forests and 
may soon acquire forestal lands. Deam, State Forester, tells us we have 
only sufficient timber stocks to last about twenty-five years, estimating 
consumption continues at its present rate. Indiana imports the bulk of 
its wood stocks to supply raw materials to wood-using industries capital- 
ized at $170,000,000. The state has two million acres of land unfit for 
anything but growing trees. Such lands now idle and , unproductive 
should by all means be put to work and the duty of awakening the pub- 
lic to the dire necessity of this great economic need if posterity is to 
have timber, devolves upon the information service. 

The division of geology has frequently pointed out the absolute ne- 
cessity for a topographic map of the entire state. Only an infinitesimal 
portion is mapped, yet Illinois and Ohio are completely mapped. Farm- 
ers, manufacturers, real estate dealers, quarrymen, railroads, oil and 
gas development, in fact many forms of industrialism, commercialism, 
husbandry and land development demands this forward step. The in- 
formation service seeks to impress the public with this necessity. 

Stream pollution can not go on indefinitely if we are to progress 
as we should. It not only menaces health, but renders our public waters 
unfit for human consumption or establishment contiguous thereto of 
recreational centers so essential in these days of intense industrialism 
and unrest. As engineers of the Conservation Department solve this 
perplexity the information is sent to the public and creates co-operation 
between individuals, companies, firms, municipalities and the depart- 
ment toward renewed efforts to abolish this paramount public nuisance. 

PRESS LARGELY RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR SUCCESS 

And so on without end might examples be cited where the Conserva- 
tion Department is underwriting the future of Hoosierland and ^he in- 
formation service is preaching the gospel of judicious and wise develop- 
ment. Knowing that every meritorious cause needs public approval; 
cognizant that conservation is a thing not for itself but for the masses; 
newspapers by their generous use of our material are to a great extent 
directly responsible for our progress. We are deeply appreciative of 
this friendship and co-operation. To announce a continuation of their 
splendid support means a wealthier, happier Hoosier citizenship in the 
future. 



Department of Conservation 339 

STATEMENTS OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 



DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 



RECEIPTS 



Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $48,269 50 

Licenses- 
Resident hunting and fishing 114,620 20 

Non-resident hunting 1,456 50 

Non-resident fishing 8,691 60 

Lake Michigan 345 00 

Fees from fines 6,340 00 

Certificates of inspection 670 00 

Scientific permits 18 00 

Ferret permits 195 00 

Confiscated furs 275 50 

Old tires 45 85 

Old power pump — Wawasee hatchery 15 00 

Old launch — Wawasee Lake 150 00 

Old scraper (2) — Riverside hatchery 10 00 

Old shot guns (2)— by R. D. Fleming 10 00 

Conscience money — postmarked Wabash, Ind 10 00 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Game Wardens — 

Salaries $36,737 37 

Wages 18 00 

Postage 109 75 

Field equipment 55 58 

Field supplies 66 87 

Meals and lodging 12,403 92 

Railroad and traction 957 29 

Motor vehicles — 

Storage $915 16 

Supplies 3,010 86 

Repairs 1,093 82 

Tires 2,334 63 

Equipment 24 52 

5 Ford touring cars, 2 Ford Coupelets... 2,869 10 

10,248 09 

Auto license and certificates of title 71 00 

Telephone and telegraph 152 18 

Express, freight and drayage 24 93 

Auto, livery and boat hire 1,619 35 

Warden House, Wawasee — 

Repairs and supplies 204 95 

Light and heat 75 98 

Fort Wayne office rent 240 00 

Medical services 10 00 

2 motor boats 404 50 

2 motor boat trailers. ...,,. 128 65 



$181,122 15 



^3,528 31 



340 Year Book 

Brought forward $63,528 31 

Fish Hatcheries — 

Salaries $11,393 09 

Wages 893 97 

Postage 6 14 

Field equipment 764 75 

Field supplies 154 48 

Meals and lodging , 1,437 63 

Railroad and traction fare 90 63 ' 

Motor vehicles — 

Storage $68 75 

Supplies 715 64 

Repairs 277 35 

Tires \ 432 04 

Equipment 219 00 

Ford roadster $562 91 

Credit for old car No. 6 285 00 

277 91 

Second-hand Ford roadster-truck 325 00 

2.315 69 

Auto licenses 6 00 

Insurance — 2 Reo trucks 29 27 

Telegraph and telephone 64 35 

Express, freight and drayage 24 31 

Auto, livery and boat hire 1 00 

General repairs 691 34 

Non-structural improvements 2,230 44 

Structures and parts 909 50 

Household supplies 21 15 

Feed 5 71 

Light 11 73 

Donations — plantings of fish 250 00 

21,301 08 

State Organizer — 

Salary $1,500 00 

Postage 3 00 

Field supplies 64 

Meals and lodging 577 51 

Railroad and traction fare 469 02 

Telegraph and telephone 40 

Auto, livery and boat hire 2 50 

2,553 07 

State Parks — Fish and game protection 2,100 00 

State Game Experiment Station — 

Salaries $1,200 00 

Wages , • 1,038 40 

Postage 3 00 

OflSce supplies 11 00 

Field supplies 22 73 

Meals and lodging 34 27 

Railroad and traction fare 24 56 

Telegraph and telephone 49 50 

Express, freight and drayage 23 73 

Auto hire 239 92 

Farm implements and repairs , 6 10 

Rent (lease) 500 00 

Printing and public9,tions 2 60 

Material 286 32 

Bantams 5 00 

Pheasants 155 00 

Cow 75 00 

Feed 301 12 

3,978 25 

Carried forward $93,460 71 



Department of Conservation 341 

Brought forward $93,460 71 

Indianapolis Office and Miscellaneous Bills — 

Salaries and wages $9,447 33 

Office equipment 966 07 

Postage 670 39 

Office supplies 1,345 90 

Field equipment 272 16 

Field supplies 189 15 

Meals and lodging 339 54 

Railroad and traction fare 698 50 

Motor vehicles — 

Repairs 14 15 

Tires 49 67 

Equipment 24 92 

Telegraph and telephone 437 15 

Express, freight and drayage 30 34 

Auto, livery and boat hire , 334 12 

Library and periodicals 63 06 

Printing and publications 4,616 52 

Legal services 576 76 

Motion picture films 2,731 48 

22,807 12 

Total $116,267 83 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 64,854 32 



$181,122 15 



REVOLVING FUND— DIVISION OF LANDS AND WATERS 



Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $14,803 45 

Turkey Run Park — 

Gate receipts ; 5,396 60 

Auto storage 467 75 

Concessions 2,826 25 

Office — ^Turkey Run pamphlets 11 00 

Refund telephone toll 80 

Governor's contingent fund — Clifty Falls 15,000 00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries $833 32 

Wages 527 25 

Postage 3 75 

Office supplies 12 98 

Field equipment 23 00 

Field supplies 31 32 

Meals and lodging 50 85 

Railroad and traction fare 83 75 

Moto:; vehicles — 

Supplies $29 09 

Repairs 99 95 

129 04 

Telegraph and telephone 8 85 

Express, freight and drayage 147 35 

Auto, livery and boat hire 96 53 

Insurance 305 66 

General repairs 851 15 

Non-structural improvements 493 32 

Structures and parts 4,523 14 

Household supplies 2 45 

Nursery stock 107 08 

Carried forward $8,230 79 



$38,505 85 



342 Year Book 

Brought forward $8,230 79 

Fertilizer 15 00 

Legal services 106 25 

Museum 10 00 

Printing and publications 65 30 

Library and periodicals 5 00 

Survey — Bass Lake 150 00 

"Wells — McCormick's Creek Park 453 75 

Fire equipment — parks 440 00 

Clifty Falls 5,694 50 

Petty cash fund (see page 343) 1,000 00 

$16,170 59 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 22,385 26 



REVOLVING FUND— DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $6,803 15 

359 copies of "Trees of Indiana" 449 10 

DISBUBSEMENTS 

Museum specimens $1,500 00 

Land — Clark and Scott counties 8,656 64 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 , 2,095 61 



$88,505 85 



$7,252 25 



$7,252 25 



REVOLVING FUND— DIVISION OF GEOLOGY 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $64 58 

Publications 363 66 

Use of auto 10 00 

$488 24 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 $438 24 

REVOLVING FUND— DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $357 95 

Dr, Evermann's reports ( 84 sets) 322 00 

Game Station — 

Gate receipts 21 50 

38 bushels corn 26 60 

Poultry 266 75 

Public auction, December 6th^ — 

4 horses $70 50 

2 cows 131 00 

1 calf 16 50 

SYz tons liay 97 75 

288 bushels corn 201 64 

Farm implements 149 90 

$667 29 

Less auctioneer and clerk expense 58 88 

618 41 



$1,608 21 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Palance on hand September 30, 1931 ,,,,,,,, $1,608 21 



Department of Conservation 343 
petty cash fund 

1921 

May 18 — From revolving fund, warrant No. 86377 $1,000 00 

Sept. 80 — Indiana National Bank $1 82 90 

J. M. Davis — McCormick's Creek Park 11 77 

R. P. Luke— Turkey Run Park 163 48 

Samuel Wallace— Clifty Falls 37 74 

Due from Auditor for receipts filed September 30th 553 37 

Cash on hand 50 74 



DIVISION OF GEOLOGY— GAS WELL FEES 



Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $141 50 

Fees collected 4,650 00 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Fees to inspectors $3,632 00 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 1,159 50 



' DIVISION OF ENTOMOLOGY— LICENSE FUND 
RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $2,125 15 

Licenses — nursery stock 551 00 



Salaries $2,299 98 

Postage 60 00 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 316 17 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS TO STATE GENERAL FUND 

Division of Lands and Waters — 

26% bushels apples $21 30 

1% cords wood 5 00 

100 pounds beans " 5 00 

138 bushels corn 89 60 

9 1-3 bushels wheat 9 33 

20% bushels oats 6 10 

13 loads gravel 3 25 

Division of Forestry — 

38 1-3 bushels wheat $43 30 

Fodder 2 00 

27 cords wood 94 00 

Cross ties ^ 73 65 

10 gum boards 1 00 

1 old lawn mower 50 



$1,000 00 



$4,791 50 



$4,791 50 



$2,676 15 



$2,676 15 



$139 58 



214 45 



$354 03 
Appropriation $60,000 00 



344 Year Book 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Division of General Administration — 

Salaries , $5,200 00 

Per diem of commissioners 545 00 

Postage 85 75 

Office supplies 149 14 

Field supplies 10 00 

Meals and lodging 49 45 

Railroad and traction fare 110 24 

Telegraph and telephone 52 03 

Auto, livery and boat hire 54 51 

Insurance 100 00 

Printing and publications 90 45 

$6,446 S"/ 

Division of Entomology — 

Salaries $10,284 44 

Wages 33 00 

Office equipment 119 69 

Postage 218 00 

Office supplies 376 50 

Field equipment 195 37 

Field supplies 309 29 

Meals and lodging 1,628 58 

Railroad and traction fare 1,369 22 

Motor vehicles — 

Storage $9 50 

Supplies 178 13 

Repairs 16 13 

Tires 81 38 

Equipment 3 00 

288 14 

Auto license 6 00 

Telegraph and telephone 85 49 

Express, freight and drayage 35 06 

Auto, livery and boat hire 552 25 

Fair exhibit 17 85 

Printing and publications 60 45 

Library and periodicals 16 95 

15,596 28 

Division of Geology — • 

Salaries $5,533 40 

Wages 30 10 

Office equipment 50 81 

Postage 180 02 

Office supplies 202 29 

Field equipment 34 26 

Field supplies 56 21 

Meals and lodging 641 09 

Railroad and traction fare 283 58 

Motor vehicles — 

Storage $6 65 

Supplies 209 28 

Repairs Ill 05 

Tires 89 60 

416 58 

Telegraph and telephone 57 38 

Express, freight and drayage ? 25 65 

Auto, livery and boat hire 130 70 , 

Museum 164 19 

Printing and publications 1,329 59 

9.135 85 

Carried forward $31,178 70 



Department of Conservation 845 

Brought forward $31,178 70 

Division of Forestry and Reservation — 

Salaries $5,720 01 

Wages : 1,426 73 

Office equipment 4 00 

Postage 195 25 

Office supplies 150 19 

Field equipment 81 10 

Field supplies 201 83 

Meals and lodging 216 69 

Railroad and traction fare 260 57 

Express, freight and drayage 173 48 

Auto and livery hire 468 19 

Telegraph and telephone 64 87 

• Insurance 30 00 

Material 136 31 

General repairs 8 88 

Farm implements and repairs 38 43 

Feed 144 45 

Household supplies 53 70 

Nursery stock 651 05 

Seeds 31 24 

Fertilizer 81 20 

Museum 69 49 

Printing and publications 3,602 15 

Library and periodicals 18 98 

Abstract of title 35 00 

13,863 29 

Division of Lands and Waters — 

Salaries $1,716 66 

Wages 180 20 

Office equipment 3 50 

Postage 94 00 

Office supplies 12 16 

Field equipment 196 86 

Field supplies 1 00 

Meals and lodging 85 57 

Railroad and traction fare 156 67 

Motor vehicles — 

Supplies 3 35 

Repairs 126 63 

Telegraph and telephone 100 45 

Express, freight and drayage 229 98 

Auto and livery hire 35 50 

Insurance 373 20 

General repairs 268 57 

Non-structural improvements 2,407 67 

Structures and parts 2,360 03 

Printing and publications 505 83 

Bridge 2.043 75 

Heating plant 3,823 00 

Fire equipment 40 70 

Library and periodicals 4 00 

Legal services 183 63 

Clifty Falls 5 00 

14,957 91 

Total $59,999 90 

Unused appropriation September 30, 1921 10 



$60,000 00 



346 Year Book 

Division of Engineering — 

Appropriation $7,500 00 

Salaries $4,391 77 

Wages . 287 80 

Office supplies 121 48 

Field equipment 266 04 

Field supplies 197 15 

Meals and lodging 1,361 57 

Railroad fare and traction fare 342 92 

Motor vehicles- 
Storage 3 00 

Supplies 12 20 

Telegraph and telephone 80 

Express, freight and drayage 17 99 

Auto and livery hire 279 51 

General repairs 204 10 ' 

Printing and publications 5 00 

$7,491 S3 

Unused appropriation September 30, 1921 8 67 



$7,500 00 



SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATIONS, RECEIPTS. DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCES 
On Hand at the Beginning, and the End of the Fiscal Year, 1920-21 

Appropriation — 

General -. $60,000 00 

Engineering 7,500 00 

FUNDS 

Protective and Propagation — 
Fish and Game — 

Balance on hand $48,269 50 

Receipts 132,852 65 

181,122 15 

Revolving — 

Fish and Game — 

Balance on hand ^ $357 95 

Receipts 1,250 26 

1,608 21 

Forestry — 

Balance on hand $6,803 15 

Receipts 449 10 

. 7,252 25 

Geology — 

Balance on hand $64 58 

Receipts 373 66 

438 24 

Lands and Waters — 

Balance on hand $14,803 45 

Receipts 23,702 40 

88,505 85 

Petty cash 1,000 00 

Gas Well Fees- 
Geology — 

Balance on hand $141 60 

Receipts 4,650 00 

4,791 50 

License — 

Entomology — 

Balance on hand $2,125 15 

Receipts 551 00 

2,676 15 

Miscellaneous receipts 854 03 

Total $806,248 88 



Department op Conservation 847 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Appropriation — 

General $68,369 07 

Less amount of general administration expense apportioned 

to and included in Division of Fish and Game 8,369 17 

$59,999 90 

General — unused appropriation , 10 

Engineering 7,491 33 

Unused appropriation 8 67 

FUNDS 

Protective and Propagation — 

Fish and Game $116,267 83 

Balance on hand 64,854 32 

181,122 ir> 

Revolving — 

Fish and Game — 

Balance on hand 1,608 21 

Forestry $5,156 64 

Balance on hand 2,095 61 

: 7,252 25 

Geology — balance on hand 438 24 

Lands and Waters $15,170 59 

Transfer to petty cash fund 1,000 00 

Balance on hand 22,335 26 

38.505 85 

Petty Cash— balance on hand 1,000 00 



Gas Well 

Geology •. $3,632 00 

Balance on hand 1,159 50 

— 4,791 50 

License — 

Entomology $2,359 98 

Balance on hand 316 17 

2,676 15 

Miscellaneous receipts to state general fund 354 03 

$305,248 38 

Total expenditures by department $210,078 27 

Miscellaneous receipts to state general fund 354 03 

Unused appropriation 8 77 

Transfer to petty cash fund : 1,000 00 

Balance on hand (all funds) 93,807 31 

Total $305,248 38 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

1. Trees of Indiana — exhausted. 

2. Laws of Indiana Relative to Natural Eesources. 

3. A Digest of the Laws. 
3a. Digest— 1920 edition. 

4. The Why and "Wherefore of Conservation in Indiana. 

5. Turkey Run State Park — 25c. Postpaid. 

6. Indiana Kaolin — 35c in paper, 50c in cloth. Postpaid. 

7. Lake Maxinkuckee — A Physical and Biological Survey by 
Evermann and Clark. $2.00 to residents, $8.50 to non-residents. Post- 
paid. 



348 Year Book 

8. Oil and Gas Report — 50c to residents (in paper), $1.00 to non- 
residents. Postpaid. 

9. Fish Culture. 

10. Proceedings of Tri- State Forestry Conferences. 

11. One Hundred Years of Natural Resources — out of print. 

12. Forest Reserve Guide — out of print. 

13. Trees of Indiana— $1.25 in cloth. Postpaid. 

14. First Annual Report— April 1, 1919, to September 30, 1919. 

15. Second Annual Report— October 1, 1919, to September 30, 1920. 

16. Survey of Natural Resources — limited edition. 

17. Breeding of Skunk. 

18. Fish and Game Laws — A Digest — 1921. 

19. Assessment of Forest Lands. 

20. Points of Interest in Indiana. 

21. Handbook of Geology — on press. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Railway and Hotel Guide to State Parks — exhausted. 

Auto Roads Hotel Rates, Railway Schedules to State Parks and 
Reservations — eight pages — exhausted. 

Your Part in a United Effort to Protect the Fish, Game and Birds 
of Indiana — six pages — Chas. Biederwolf — exhausted. 

Post cards (Turkey Run) — twelve subjects. 

Post cards (McCormick's Creek Canyon) — twelve subjects. 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

WARREN T. McCRAY, Governor. 
WILLIAM G. OLIVER, Auditor of State. 
JESSE E. ESCHBACH, State Examiner. 

DEPARTMENT OF INSPECTION AND SUPERVISION OF PUBLIC OFFICES 

JESSE E. ESCHBACH, State Examiner. 
LAWRENCE F. ORR, Deputy Examiner. 
WALTER G. OWENS, Deputy Examiner. 

The public accounting law of Indiana is very generally endorsed to- 
day and we believe it to be the best and most economical accounting law 
of any state in the union. 

The board consists of the Governor and the Auditor of State, who 
are members ex-officio, and a State Examiner, appointed by the Governor 
for a term of four years. The chief executive officer of the State Board 
of Accounts is the State Examiner, who is assisted in the administrative 
work of the office by two deputy examiners. The duties of the State 
Board of Accounts are to prescribe and install a uniform system 
of accounting and reporting for all public offices and institutions which 
will exhibit in clear, succinct and understandable form all receipts and 
expenditures of public money, the use and disposition of public prop- 
erty, and the sources of all public revenue; to determine the validity of 
all financial transactions involving public money; to formulate all state- 
ments and reports required for the internal administration of any pub- 
lic office; to conduct periodical examinations of the financial operations of 
every state, county, township, city and town office, as well as all public 
service industries, such as municipal light and water plants; to recover all 
public money unlawfully obtained by any public official by fraud, delin- 
quency, negligence, peculation, ignorance or misunderstanding; and to 
guide and assist public officials in the discharge of the duties of their 
respective offices by the promulgation of administrative orders, rulings 
and regulations and the construction and interpretation of the statutes 
under which they are required to operate. 

UNIFORM ACCOUNTING 

In compliance with the provisions of the public accounting law, the 
State Board of Accounts has developed, prescribed and installed a uni- 
form and simplified system of bookkeeping and accounting for each of 
the public offices and state institutions of Indiana. Under this system, 
less time is required than formerly to keep public records. 



350 Year Book 

field examiners 

The work of examining and investigating public offices and install- 
ing public records is assigned to field examiners, who are appointed by 
the State Examiner. All candidates for the position of field examiner 
are required to pass an open, competitive examination, are selected on 
account of their fitness and ability and are assigned to duty in pairs, 
representing opposite political parties. At the close of each examination 
the field examiners confer with the officer whose records have been 
examined and verify each item of error charged against him; if the 
officer's explanation is satisfactory, credit is given for all items satis- 
factorily explained and the officer may then pay the amount of the re- 
maining errors to the proper authority and be given proper credit. Ap- 
proximately 85% of all errors and irregularities have been settled with 
delinquent officials in this manner by the field examiners. The discrep- 
ancies disclosed in public records by the field examiners are largely due 
to mistakes and misinterpretations of the law, and public officers gen- 
erally have displayed a spirit of willingness and frankness in the adjust- 
ment of discrepancies. 

AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD 

The board of accounts does not confine its activities exclusively to 
the auditing of accounts of public officers and the recovery of public 
funds which are knowingly or unwittingly misappropriated. A mere 
audit of public accounts will give no idea of the range or magnitude of 
the irregularities and malpractices which have obtained throughout the 
state in awarding public contracts, disbursing public money and carry- 
ing on public work. The official acts of the department have been based 
on the theory, amply sustained by the express provisions of the account- 
ing law, that everything should be done which will aid public officials in 
preventing the waste of public funds and guarantee value received for 
each dollar of public money expended. The operation of the department 
in the discharge of these ancillary public functions has yielded the most 
beneficent results. Among the more conspicuous and flagrant abuses 
which the board of accounts has investigated and practically eliminated 
are the sale of "short weight" furnaces and bridges, vending of teachers' 
contracts, malpractices in the construction and repair of bridges and 
free gravel roads, and the practice of charging different prices for the 
^ame articles when sold under substantially identical conditions. 

ROADS AND BRIDGES 

The loss in construction of roads throughout the state aggregates 
millions of dollars. There are many instances where bridges did not 
contain the required amount of material as provided in the specifications, 
and were badly and improperly constructed; of short weights; of the 
construction of dredge ditches which did not comply with the plans and 
specifications; of short yardage of gravel and stone in the construction 
of roads; of various inferior materials and workmanship on public 
building contracts; of fictitious names carried on payrolls where no 
work was done at all; of the destruction of time sheets and time books; 



State Board op Accounts 351 

and of the endorsements of spurious checks to the extent of thousands of 
dollars by unsuspecting endorsers. These unfortunate conditions were 
made possible by the loose methods of doing business and the opportu- 
nities which formerly existed by which frauds could be practiced by 
collusion among commissioners, gravel road engineers and contractors. 
Many of these practices have been eliminated by the investigations 
and examinations conducted by the State Board of Accounts through its 
field examiners and civil engineers. One obstacle which stands in the 
way of further progress is the fact that many county surveyors are 
without any technical knowledge whatsoever with which to perform the 
duties of their office. Almost invariably, the county surveyors have 
charge of the plans and specifications for all bridges, turnpikes, roads, 
ditches, drains, levees and other surveying and engineering work. The 
value of public highways alone which are constructed annually under 
the supervision of the county surveyors aggregates three or four million 
dollars. The law provides a per diem for the official services of 
surveyors; as high as seven per diems have been charged for a single 
day; and the expense accounts vary 500% in some counties in com- 
parison with other counties in performing the same services; bridge 
companies furnish plans and specifications free to the county surveyor, 
although the surveyor receives pay from the county for preparing such 
plans and specifications and the surveyor then uses his influence with 
the board of commissioners in favor of such bridge companies. It is 
such intolerable practices as these which clearly demon"§trate the neces- 
sity of an investigation as well as an audit and the election of men to 
the office of county surveyor of technical ability .and known probity. 

BUDGET SYSTEM 

Under the provisions of the public accounting law, providing for the 
adoption and installation of complete forms, records and accounts for the 
proper conservation of all public expenditures, the State Board of Ac- 
counts is entrusted with the necessary authority to prepare forms for 
the estimate of receipts and expenditures for public offices, except such 
offices as receive their appropriations directly from the General Assembly, 
and the department has prepared a complete budget system for state 
offices, institutions, boards, bureaus and commissions for all county, city, 
town and township offices. This budget is so devised that it will not 
in any way infringe upon the constitutional prerogatives of the mem- 
bers of the General Assembly; it will furnish accurate information for 
executive recommendations, and a basis for legislative review, criticism 
and final action; and has been fully approved by Professor E. M. FuU- 
ington, at one time budget commissioner and for ten years at the head 
of the State Board of Accounts of Ohio. 

The adoption of the "budget system" as prescribed and installed by 
this department in the various offices throughout the state means 
a total saving of large sums of money annually and materially re- 
duces the expense of examination of public offices by the State Board of 
Accounts. The president of the county council of one of the largest 
counties of the state asserted that by reason of the "budget system" pre- 



352 Year Book 

pared by the State Board of Accounts, they were enabled to reduce their 
appropriations more than $100,000.00 in one year. 

The statement has frequently been made by persons who do not 
understand the work of the department, that every dollar expended in its 
administration was a total loss to the state and its municipalities. For 
the information of those who insist upon measuring the value of the 
law in dollars and cents, we set out herein a condensed financial state- 
ment of the expense of the department and the total recoveries to the 
state and its municipalities for the fiscal year ending September 20, 
1921. 

While it is shown there has been recovered and returned to the dif- 
ferent municipalities, as the result of our examinations $42,464.33 over 
and above the total expense of the department, the preventive and re- 
pressive effect has been worth many times this amount to the taxpayers 
of the state. 

STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS 

STATEMENT OF CHARGES AND SETTLEMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

Charges pending settlement October 1, 1920 $201,757 36 

Charges docketed during year ending September 30, 1921 429,914 47 



Total $631,671 83 

Adjusted by field examiners $138,398 93 

Paid to department 2,345 70 

Paid to municipalities 29,457 23 



Total $170,201 86 

Credits on explanation • 38,712 47 

Certified to Governor 26,322 30 

Pending settlement in department October 1, 1921 396,435 20 



REPORTS CERTIFIED AND RECALLED 



Pending settlement October 1, 1920 

Recalled during year ending September 30, 1921. 



Total 

Paid $95 85 

Dismissed 116 89 

Pending October 1, 1921 13,318 84 



$631,671 83 


$8,077 88 


5,453 70 


$13,531 58 


13,531 58 



CERTIFIED REPORTS 

Pending settlement in Attorney-General's office October 1, 1920 $501,718 70 

Certified during year ending September 30, 1921 26,322 30 



Total , $528,041 00 

Recalled by department $5,453 70 

Collected by Attorney-General 6,044 26 

Dismissed 24,057 31 

Pending settlement October 1, 1921 492,485 73 

■ 528,041 00 

TOTAL RECOVERIES 

By department $170,297 71 

By Attorney-General 6,044 26 



Total $176,341 97 



State Board of Accounts 353 

disbursements 

October 1, 1920, to September 30. 1921 

OFFICE 

Salaries $17,194 48 

Office and traveling expense 1,668 09 

Total $18,862 57 

FIELD EXAMINERS 

Per diem $112,695 00 

Railroad fare 2,320 07 

$115,015 07 

Total expense $133,877 64 

Appropriations for office salaries and expense $31,700 00 

Disbursements for office salaries and expense 18,862 57 

Amount reverting to general fund $12,837 43 

Total recoveries $176,341 97 

Total expense 133,877 64 

Recoveries over and above all expense $42,464 33 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF CERTIFIED ACCOUNTANTS 



JESSE E. ESCHBACH, Presideni. 
LAWRENCE F. ORR, Secretary. 
WALTER G. OWENS, Treasurer. 

Due to the efforts of Senator C. 0. Holmes of Gary, in co-operation 
with the State Board of Certified Accountants, the 1921 legislature 
enacted a certified public accountant law which supersedes the 1915 act 
and is more in keeping with the present day needs of the accountant and 
the operations of the State Board of Certified Accountants of Indiana. 
The new law became effective March 10, 1921, with the approval of the 
Governor. 

The chief purpose of the 1921 law is to elevate the standards of 
accountancy in Indiana by a close co-operation with other states on a 
national and uniform basis in holding C. P. A. examinations. 

The State Board of Certified Accountants accepted the plan offered 
by the American Institute of Accountants and conducted its first exam- 
ination under said plan in November, 1919. Examinations followed in 
May and November, 1920, under the same arrangements. -The board 
realized that the plan was far more beneficial to accountants than at 
first anticipated and having operated under said plan could not afford 
to drop it. Consequently the new law was written in order that the 
board might have full authority to make rules and requirements tending 
toward the closest possible national co-operation. 

At present, there are thirty-seven states, including Indiana, operat- 
ing under the auspices of the American Institute of Accountants and 
examinations covering a period of two days are held the middle 

23—19930 



354 Year Book 

of May and November each year on exactly the same days, the 
same hours, and with the same questions in all of said states. Manu- 
scripts submitted by candidates so examined are graded by the exam- 
iners of the institute and certificates are issued to applicants whom the 
examiners of the institute have declared successful. 

The Indiana law provides that a citizen of the United States or a 
person who has duly declared his intention of becoming- such citizen, 
not less than twenty-one years of age; of good moral character; a 
graduate of a high school or having received an equivalent education, 
with at least three years' experience in the practice of accounting and 
who has received from the State Board a certificate of his qualifications 
to practice as a public accountant shall be styled and known as a certi- 
fied public accountant. 

Under the provisions of the law, the board is required to hold semi- 
annual examinations for candidates desiring to obtain Indiana certif- 
icates. The board is also given authority to issue certificates without 
examination to applicants who hold certificates issued by other states,' 
provided that the requirements of such other states for obtaining C. P. A. 
certificates are substantially the same as those provided by the Indiana 
C. P. A. law and the rules of the board, and provided further that such 
states will agree to enter into reciprocal relations with the Indiana 
board. The board is also granted authority to issue certificates without 
examination to members of the American Institute of Accountants. 

As a result of the new law and the plan of co-operation with other 
states under the American Institute of Accountants, the number of candi- 
dates has steadily increased and as a fee of $25.00 is required of each 
applicant for a certificate, a neat sum is paid into the State Treasury 
each year. The law provides that the amount in excess of $100.00 at 
the end of the fiscal year shall be paid into the state treasury after all 
expenses of the board have been met. Fees on hand from candidates 
whose applications have not been passed upon by the board are also 
retained in the treasury at the end of the year. 

The effort of the State Board of Certified Accountants of Indiana 
is to maintain a high standard of accountancy. The Indiana certificate 
is attained through merit and qualifications and is unexcelled by any 
C. P. A. certificate issued in the United States. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
KECETPra 

Oct. 1, 1920 — Fees on hand, applications pending $ 260 00 

Fees received from applicant 2,360 00 

Depository interest 13 29 

Total $2,633 29 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salary of secretary and treasurer $ 223 28 

Fees refunded 295 00 

Convention expense 104 37 

Office and examination expense 1,370 28 

Sept. 30, 1921 — ^Paid to treasurer of state 515 36 

Balance retained in treasury of board 125 00 

Total $2,688 29 



REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COAL AND FOOD COMMIS- 
SION OF INDIANA 



i 



JESSE E. ESCHBACH, Chairman. 
JAMES P. GOODRICH, Vice-Chairman. 
July 31, 1920— January 10, 1921. 

WARREN T. McCRAY, Vice-Chairman. 
January 10, 1921— March 31, 1921. 

OTTO L. KLAUS S, Secretary. 

July 31, 1920— December 1, 1920. 

WILLIAM G. OLIVER, Secretary. 
December 1, 1920— March 31, 1921. 

On October 5, 1920, after wide investigations and extensive hearings, 
the commission promulgated three orders: Order number one fixing the 
maximum price of coal at the mouth of the mine; orders numbers two 
and three fixing the margin of profit to wholesalers and retailers of 
coal respectively. 

From time to time, slight modifications were made in these orders 
to meet local or changing conditions. 

With few exceptions, the prices as fixed by the commission were fol- 
lowed strictly by the mine operators, wholesalers and retailers. As a 
result, the price of coal to the consumer was reduced in many cases fifty 
per cent. 

It was conservatively estimated that in addition to funds paid to 
the State Treasury Department, the efforts of the special coal and food 
commission saved more than a million and a half dollars to the coal 
consumers of Indiana. 

The report submitted to the Indiana General Assembly shows cash 
receipts and disbursements as follows: 

Collected as license fees $21,815 30 

Tonnage tax, one cent per ton 91,535 25 



Total collections by the commission $113,350 55 

Total cost of commission, experts, etc 39,923 84 

Balance in state treasury $ 73,426 71 



The act creating the special coal and food commission was an in- 
novation in Indiana legislation. 

The results obtained in a great economic emergency justified the 
means and proved the wisdom of the enactment. 

The exercise of the state's police power to save the inhabitants 
thereof from actual suffering has proved the efficacy of such legislation 
to serve the people in an impending crisis. 



REPORl^ OF THE INDIANA STATE LIBRARY 



OFFICIAL ORGANIZATION 

LIBRARY BOARD 
t 

L. N. HINES, President, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

WM. W. PARSONS, President State Normal School. 

WM. L. BRYAN, President Indiana University. 

W. E. STONE, President Purdue University. 

ELLIS U. GRAFF, Superintendent Indianapolis Schools. 

L. P. BENEZET, Superintendent Evansville Schools. 

LOUIS C. WARD, Superintendent Fort Wayne Schools. 

F. F. HEIGHWAY, Superintendent Lake County Schools. 

MRS. E. E. OLCOTT, North Vernon. 

ELWOOD HAYNES, Kokomo. 

GEORGE R. GROSE, President Depauw University.. 

CLIFFORD FUNDERBURG, Superintendent Huntington County 

Schools. 
HARRY F. FIDLER, Indianapolis. 
DEMARCHUS C. BROWN, Librarian and Secretary of Board. 

STATE LIBRARY STAFF 

DEMARCHUS C. BROWN, State Librarian. 

GRACE, NIXON, Secretary to the Librarian. 

M. MARGUERITE LEWIS, Copyist. 

FLORENCE VENN, Reference Librarian. 

MARY H. ROBERTS, Assistant Reference Librarian. 

ANNA POUCHER, Assistant. 

FRANCES A. YORN, Assistant. 

JENNIE SCOTT, Chief Cataloger. 

LUELLA NELSON, Assistant Cataloger. 

NORRIS JESSUP, Assistant. ' 

MAUD VENN, Assistant. 

FLORENCE SANDERS, Assistant. 

HARLOW LINDLEY, Director History and Archives Department. 

ESTHER U. McNITT, Assistant. 

0. P. BOWMAN, Custodian and Messenger and Shelf Assistant. 

GEORGE DAVIS, Janitor. 

CREATION AND HISTORY 

The Constitutional Convention of 1816, by resolution, recommended 
to the General Assembly the establishment of a State Library, but no 
legislative action was taken until 1825, when the Secretary of State 
was directed to act as librarian, the Governor, Secretary of State, audi- 
tor and treasurer serving as a board of commissioners. This arrange- 



State Library 357 

ment continued until 1841 when the library became a separate institu- 
tion, the librarian being appointed by the legislature. In 1867 the law 
books were taken from the general collection and organized into the 
law library under the control of the supreme court. In 1895 the library 
was recognized as a part of the educational system of the state and 
placed under the control of a non-partisan body, the State Board of 
Education. Circulation of books in the early days was very much 
restricted and did not become general until 1903. The legislative ref- 
erence department was organized in 1907 and became a separate bureau 
in 1913. The Department of Indiana History and Archives was created 
in 1913. Its specific duties are the collection and preservation of mate- 
rial relating to Indiana history. 

DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS 

The State Library is primarily a reference library. It has four 
main functions: To aid state officers in their official business; to dis- 
tribute information to citizens of the state; to collect and preserve all 
Indiana material and documents of the United States and other states; 
to distribute Indiana documents. It is not, therefore, a library which 
contains current fiction or much popular reading of any sort. 

Especial effort is made to serve state officials, particularly those 
bureaus and commissions the nature of whose work requires frequent 
reference to books. Their needs are consulted in the purchase of books 
and magazines, and suggestions from them as to additions are welcomed. 

Until 1903 the foregoing duties were the chief ones of the State 
Library. In this year, however, a new and very important one was 
added when the law was passed allowing the books of the State Library 
to be loaned to all citizens of the state. Certain classes are necessarily 
restricted, but all ordinary books are circulated as freely as to the books 
of any public library. Thus a new field of activity has been opened 
up, whose educational possibilities can scarcely be exaggerated. From 
a small beginning the work has gradually been extended until now 
books and magazines go from the State Library to every comer of the 
state. 

For reference work the State Library serves as a court of higher 
appeal to the smaller public and college libraries that, with their lim- 
ited resources, have difficulty in furnishing all the books now demanded 
by their readers. It also offers library facilities to individuals, schools 
and clubs who live in the country or in towns where no library exists. 
Loans are made through the libraries when possible, and direct to the 
individual if he has access to no library. All classes are reached except 
children under high school age. Women write for help not only on liter- 
ary and art subjects, but frequently on household questions and care of 
children. Men are interested in professional or occupational subjects, 
engineering, blacksmithing, selling real estate, business management, 
to name only a few of the varied calls in this field. High school and 
college students keep us busy with requests for supplementary reading 
or for their debates on immigration, labor problems and other ques- 
tions of the day. We try to answer all letters fully and promptly and 



358 Year Book 

in cases where we do not have the required information, indicate, if 
possible, some other source which may be accessible to the writer. This 
year there was no county in the state which did not receive books from 
the State Library. 

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 

In general, the library has been most fully developed in the fields 
of history (particularly of the United States), sociology, political science, 
education, economics and technology. The literature, art and science 
departments, rather neglected in the earlier days because of the restricted 
use of the library, are being added to as rapidly as funds permit and 
the calls justify. Lack of space and money forbid the purchase of much 
in all departments that we should have, but any attempt at completeness 
being thus denied, we aim at a well selected collection as a second best 
goal. 

Its most notable collection is that on Indiana, by far the most nearly 
complete in existence, of material relating to Indiana or by Indiana writ- 
ers. Reports, pamphlets, histories, newspapers, manuscripts, maps, pic- 
tures, etc., relating to the state, form a small library in themselves and 
contain many items which are exceedingly rare or even unique. 

It also contains what is, except for some very early publications, 
practically a complete file of federal documents. These are classified 
and catalogued, and form an invaluable source of information, much of 
which is inaccessible elsewhere. These are not loaned but often ref- 
erences can be given so that the inquirer can secure the documents for 
himself. Reports of other states are sent in exchange for those of our 
own state and these are often very useful, particularly for information 
on natural resources, such as oil, gas and coal. Canadian and British 
documents are received regularly. 

The State Library has the only collection of books for the blind 
that circulates generally. The majority of new purchases are now in 
the standard type, Revised Braille. The books are exceedingly expensive, 
but the cost is well justified by the appreciation of those who use them. 
One blind reader writes us: "If the enjoyment which I have had at 
the expense of the Indiana State Library were to turn into property, 
the library for the blind would be able to treble its capacity." 

The library receives 118 newspapers, most of which are published in 
the state, each county being represented as far as possible, and 214 
magazines covering various activities such as political science, technology, 
art, music, history, education, etc. In addition to these, the proceedings 
of national organizations and learned societies form an indispensable 
part of the reference material. The library of the Indiana Academy of 
Science has been catalogued and is kept as a separate unit on the shelves 
of the State Library. Its books are available for reference to any one 
but are loaned only to members of the academy. 

This year we have collected and organized the nucleus of what will 
become, we hope, a good picture collection. It is confined entirely to art 
and for the present at least, we do not contemplate extending into other 
fields. It now consists of about seven hundred color reproductions of. 
great paintings, mostly old masters but some modern. The reproduc- 



State Library 359 

tions are Medici and Seeman prints, the latter of quite g'ood size. Both 
are extremely good in color. There are also some five hundred small 
black and white pictures, all of old masters. These pictures are loaned 
on the same terms as books. We hope that they will prove useful to 
clubs and schools. 



REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE YEAR OCTOBER 1, 1920, TO OCTOBER 1, 1921 

Books 16,910 

Borrowers 8,553 

Places (daily average 15.5) 4,654 

New registrations 584 

Reference letters '. 1,224 

Readers 10,380 

Blind: 

Books ." 787 

Borrowers 663 



DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA HISTORY AND ARCHIVES 



An act approved March 6, 1913, concerning the organization of the 
departments of the State Library provided for the creation of a Depart- 
ment of Indiana History and Archives. This act provides that the 
Department of Indiana History and Archives shall have the following 
objects and purposes: 

"1. The care and custody of official archives which come into the 
possession of the State Library; the collection of materials bearing 
upon the history of the state and of the territory included therein; the 
diffusion of knowledge in reference to the history of the state; the en- 
couragement of historical work and research. 

"2. The examination and classification of documents and records 
not of present day use to their respective departments. 

"3. Co-operation with any of the educational institutions of the 
state in any manner approved by the State Librarian, with the consent 
of the library board," 

The act also provides that "Any state, county, or other official is 
hereby authorized and empowered at his discretion, to turn over to the 
State Library for permanent preservation by the Department of Indiana 
History and Archives, any official books, records, documents, original 
papers, newspaper files and printed books and material, not in current 
use in his office." 

The department, in co-operation with the Indiana Historical Com- 
mission, is giving special care to the collecting of war material as it 
concerns Indiana, and is securing all the available war records, pictures, 
etc., of. the various counties of the state, and binding and preserving 
permanently all the original letters and papers dealing with any phase of 
Indiana's part in the world war. 



360 



Year Book 



During the year the department has secured manuscripts, pam- 
phlets, scrap books, diaries, letters and biographical material. 

The department is planning to co-operate with the Indiana His- 
torical Commission and the Department of Conservation in making an 
archaeological and historical survey of the state. 



CATALOGING DEPARTMENT 



REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

Accessions 3,380 

Pamphlets received 804. 

Volumes cataloged and added — 
Miscellaneous : 

Newspapers 152 ■ 

General works 399 

Philosophy 160 

Religion 388 

Sociology 2,386 

Philology 20 

Science 141 

Useful arts 697 

Fine arts 116 

Literature 268 

Description and travel 81 

Biography 121 

History 668 

5,592 

Federal documents 2,547 

State documents 1,154 

Foreign documents 493 

Blind . : , 101 

9,887 

Titles added 1,479 

Analyticals .' 1,913 

Revisions 296 

Cards added 12,349 

Sheets added 494 

INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 

Volumes cataloged and added '. . 420 

Titles added 14 

Analyticals 28 

Nximber of volumes in library, 91,753. 



GIFTS AND DEPOSITS 

A careful record of gifts and deposits is kept. While there are 
many, the number would be much larger if the state would provide 
more room. 

STAFF POSITIONS 

The merit system has long been established in the State Library. 
Rules and regulations under the law have been formulated by the State 
Library Board. These may be seen in the records. 



State Library 



36 i 



NEWSPAPERS RECEIVED AT THE STATE LIBRARY 



Anderson Daily Bulletin. 

Bedford Daily Democrat. 

Bicknell News. 

Bloomington Evening World. 

Bluffton Banner. 

Boston Transcript. 

Brazil Daily Times. 

Chicago Tribune. 

Columbus Evening Republican. 

Crawfordsville Journal. 

Decatur Daily Democrat. 

Evansville Courier. 

Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette. 

Gary Evening Post. 

Goshen Daily Democrat. 

Huntington Herald. 

Indiana Daily Times. 

Indianapolis Commercial. 

Indianapolis News. 

Indianapolis Star. 

Jeffersonville Star. 

Kansas City Star. 

Kokomo Tribune. 



Fafayette Courier. 
Laporte Argus. 
Logansport Pharos Tribune. 
Madison Courier. 
Marion Chronicle. 
Monticello Journal. 
Muncie Evening Press. 
Muncie Morning Star. 
New York Times. 
Peru Evening Journal. 
Princeton Clarion-Newfi. 
Princeton Democrat. 
Richmond Palladium. 
Rochester Sentinel. 
Rushville Republican. . 
San Francisco Examiner. 
Seymour Republican. 
Shelbyville Democrat. 
Shelby ville Republican. 
South Bend Times. 
South Bend Tribune. 
Valparaiso Vidette. 
Wabash Plain Dealer. 



SEMI-WEEKLY 

-Jasper County Democrat 



WEEKLY 



Albion New Era. 

Angola Herald. 

Angola — Steuben Republican. 

Attica — Fountain- Warren Democrat. 

Benton Review. 

Bloomfield News. 

Boonville Standard. 

Brazil Democrat. 

Brookville American. 

Brookville Democrat. 

Brown County Democrat. 

Carroll County Citizen-Times. 

Corydon Democrat. 

Corydon Republican. 

Covington Republican. 

Crawford County Democrat. 

Danville Republican. 

Franklin Democrat. 

Greensburg Standard. 

Hobart Gazette. 

Huntingburg Independent. 

Huntington — Our Sunday Visitor. 

Indianapolis — 

Columbian Record. 

Deutsch-Americanische Buchdrucker 
Zeitung. 

East Side News. 

Marion County Mail. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 

National Enquirer. 

Silent Hoosier. 

South Side News. 

Union. 

World. 
Jasper Courier. 
Jasper Herald. 

Kentland — Newton County Enterprise. 
Lake County Star. 
Lagrange Standard. 
Lebanon Pioneer. 
Ligonier Banner. 
Monticello Herald. 
Mooresville Times. 
National Republican. 
New Harmony Times. 
North Judson News. 
North Vernon Sun. 
Orleans — Progress Examiner. 
Oxford Gazette. 
Paoli Republican. 
Peru Republican. 

Petersburg — Pike County Democrat. 
Plymouth Democrat. 
Plymouth Republican. 
Pulaski County Democrat. 
Rockport Democrat. 



362 



Year Book 



WEEKLY — Continued 



Rockport Journal. 

Rockville Republican. 

Rockville Tribune. 

Rocky Mountain Herald. 

Salem Democrat. 

Salem Republican-Leader. 

Shoals News. 

Spencer — Owen County Democrat. 

Starke County Democrat. 



Tell City News. 

Versailles Republican. 

Vevay Reveille. 

Washington — Daviess County Democrat. 

Waterloo Press. 

White River News. 

Williamsport Pioneer. 

Winchester Journal. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS RECEIVED AT THE STATE LIBRARY 



Addisonia. 

American Anthropologist. 

American Antiquarian. 

American Catholic Historical Society 
Record. 

American Child. 

American City. 

American Economic Association Publi- 
cations. 

American Federationist. 

American Forestry. 

American Historical Review. 

American Indian Magazine. 

American Journal of Archaeology. 

American Journal of International Law. 

American Journal of Physiology. 

American Journal of Public Health. 

American Journal of Sociology. 

American Journal of Theology. 

American Legion Weekly., 

American Naturalist. 

American Political Science Review. 

American Society of Civil Engineers — 
Monthly Transactions. 

American Statistical Association Pub- 
lications. 

Annales de I'lnstitute Pasteur. 

Annals of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. 

Annals of the Entomological Society of 
America. 

Architectural Record. 

Army and Navy Register. 

Art and Archaeolpgy. 

Arts and Decoration. 

Asia. 

Association Men. 

Atlantic Monthly. 

Bankers' Magazine. 

Better Roads. 

Biblical World. 

Book Review Digest. 

Bookman. 

Botanical Abstracts. 

Botanical Gazette. 

Breeders' Gazette. 

British Journal of Tuberculosis. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Bulletin de la Societe Chemique. 



Business Digest. 

Century Magazine. 

Chemical Abstracts. 

Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering. 

Christian Science Journal. 

Christian Workers' Magazine. 

Collier's Weekly. 

Commerce Monthly. 

Commercial and Financial Chronicle. 

Community Builder. 

Concrete Highway Magazine. 

Confederate Veteran. 

Contemporary Review. 

Country Life. 

Cumulative Book Index. 

Current History Magazine. 

Current Opinion. 

Dearborn Independent. 

Deutsch-Americanische Geschichtsblatter. 

Dial. 

Drama. 

Eagle Magazine. 

Earlham Press. 

Edinburgh Review. 

Education. 

Educational Issues. 

ii^ducational Monographs. 

Educational Review. 

Educator- Journal. 

Electric Railway Journal. 

Electrical World. 

Elementary School Journal. 

Engineering and Contracting. 

Engineering and Mining Journal. 

Engineering News-Record. 

Egineering World. 

Essex Institute Historical Collections. 

Farm Life. 

Forum. 

Gas Age. 

Genealogy. 

Good Government. 

Gospel Trumpet. 

Harper's Magazine. 

Heating and Ventilating Magazine. . 

Hibbert Journal. 

Historical Outlook. 

Hoosier Motorist. 

Independent. 



State Library 



363 



LIST OF PERODiCALS — Continued 



Indiana Farmer's Guide. 

Indiana Magazine of History. 

Indianian. 

Indianapolis Medical Journal, ^ 

Industrial Arts Index. 

Industrial Arts Magazine. 

Industrial Management. 

International Studio. 

Iowa Journal of History and Politics. 

Iron Age. 

Johns Hopkins Studies in History and 

Science. 
Jourj\al of Accountancy. 
Journal of the American Chemical 

Society. 
Journal of American Folk-lore. 
Journal of American History. 
Journal of the American Institute of 

Criminal Law and Criminology. 
Joui"nal of the American Water Works 

Association. 
Journal of Bacteriology. 
Journal of Biological- Chemistry. 
Journal of Economic Entomology. 
Journal of Experimental Zoology. 
Journal of the Franklin Institute, 
Journal of Geology. 
Journal of Home Economics. 
Journal of the Indiana State Medical 

Association. 
Journal of Industrial and Engineering 

Chemistry. 
Journal of Industrial Hygiene. 
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 
Journal of Political Economy, 
Journal of the Society of Comparative 

Legislation. 
La France. 
Library Journal. 
Life. 

Literary Digest. 
Living Age. 
Magazine of History, 
Manual Training Magazine. 
Marine Biological Bulletin. 
Maryland Historical Magazine. 
Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind, 
Mayflower Descendant. 
Mechanical Engineering. 
Mexican Review. 
Midland Naturalist. 
Missionary Review of the World. 
Mississippi Valley Historical Review. 
Missouri Historical Review. 
Municipal Engineering. 
Musical America. 
Nation, 

National Academy of Sciences. 
National Economic League Quarterly. 
National Education Association. 
National Geographic Magazine. 



National Municipal Review. ^ 

Nation's Health. 

New England Historical and Genealogical 

Register. 
New England Water Works Association 

Journal. 
New Republic. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical 

Record. 
New York Times Book Review. 
Nineteenth Century. 
North American Review. 
North Carolina Booklet. 
Official Guide. 
Open Road. 

Oregon Historical Society Quarterly. 
Our Boys. 
Outlook. 

Overland Monthly. 
Pan-American Union Bulletin. 
Pedagogical Seminary. 
Pennsylvania Magazine of History and 

Biography. 
Playground, 
Poet Lore. 

Political Science Quarterly. 
Public Libraries. 
Public Service Management. 
Public Utilities Reports. 
Public Works. 
Publishers' Weekly. 
Quarterly Journal of Economics. 
Railway Age. 

Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature. 
Readers' Guide Supplement. 
Review. 

Review of Reviews. 
Royal Society: Biological Proceedings. 
Royal Society: Mathematical and Physical 

Science Proceedings. 
School and Society. 
School Review. 
Science. 

Scientific American, 
Scientific American Monthly. 
Scientific Monthly. 
Scribner's Magazine. 
Sewanee Review. 
South American. 
South Atlantic Quarterly, 
South Carolina Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine, 
Southwestern Historical Quarterly. 
Soviet Russia. 
Special Libraries. 
Spectator. 

Standard Bond Offerings. 
Survey. 
System. 

Tennessee Historical Magazine. 
Theatre. 






364 Year Book 

UST OF PERODiCALS — Continued 

Theosophicfil Quarterly. Washin^on' Historical Quarterly. 

Tyler's Historical Magazine. Wisconsin Archaeologist. 

United Mine Workers' Journal. Woman Citizen. 

United States Bulletin. World Call. 

U. S. Investor. World's Work. 

Virginia Magazine of History and Biography.Yale Review. 

Visual Education. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

The following is a statement of the receipts and disbursements of the state library 
for the year ending September 30, 1921. 

APPROPRIATIONS 

Appropriations — regular $31,000 00 

Receipts aside from appropriations 16 37 

$31,016 37 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salary of Librarian $ 2,500 00 

Salaries in office department 2,834 06 

Salaries in catalog department 6,658 00 

Salaries in reference department ; 5,464 75 

Books and binding 6,984 49 

Indiana history and archives 4,519 55 

Cabinets 298 76 

Office expense, supplies and distribution 1,546 63 

Traveling expense 113 83 

Total $30,920 07 

Balance $ 96 30 



INDIANA LAW LIBRARY 



CHARLES E. EDWARDS, Librarian. 
RICHARD W. ERWIN, Assistant Librarian. 

The Indiana Law Library had its beginning in an act passed by the 
legislature in the year 1876, providing separate rooms for the law books; 
then in the State Library; placing them in the custody of the supreme 
court; authorizing the judges to make such purchases of books as they 
might deem advisable, and make rules and regulations for the use of 
the library. The beginning was small, for the books transferred to the 
custody of the court were very few, and its present magnitude is a source 
of gratification to all who have been connected with the library in the 
fifty-five years of its existence. The library is estimated to contain 
about 70,000 volumes, 340 volumes being added the past year. The 
library is in constant use by attorneys from this and other states, and 
is of much help to the law students from the different schools. The 
members of the supreme court who have control and custody of the 
library are: 

Hon. Howard L. Townsend, Chief Justice; Hon. Louis B. Ewbank; 
Hon. David A. Myers; Hon. Benjamin M. Willoughby; Hon. Julius C. 
Travis. 



REPORT OF THE INDIANA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



DR. FRANK B. WYNN, President. 
SAMUEL M. FOSTER, Vice-President. 
HARLOW LINDLEY, Secretary. 

WARREN T. McCRAY. 

JAMES A. WOODBURN. 

CHARLES W. MOORES. 

MATTHEW J. WALSH. 

MRS. JOHN N. CAREY. 

LEW M. O'BANNON 

JOHN W. OLIVER, Director. 

LUCY M. ELLIOTT, Assistant Director. 

The Indiana Historical Commission was created by an act of the 
legislature, approved March 8, 1915. (Chapter 109, page 455.) The 
commission consists of nine members, not more than five (5) of whom 
shall be of the same political faith : Ex-officio members are the Gov- 
ernor, the director of the Indiana Historical Survey of Indiana Univer- 
sity, and the director of the Department of Indiana History and Archives 
of the State Library. The additional six members are appointed by the 
Governor, one of whom is nominated by the Indiana Historical Society. 

RENEWED INTEREST IN STATE AND LOCAL HISTORY 

One of the special duties assigned to the Indiana Historical Commis- 
sion by the legislative act above mentioned was that of providing for a 
centennial celebration of Indiana's one hundredth birthday in 1916. For 
the first time in Indiana history Hoosiers in all parts of the state turned 
aside from their ordinary duties during that year, long enough to take 
a census of the state's development during the first century of its exist- 
ence. Reverence was paid to the pioneer men and women whose labor 
and sacrifice made possible the founding of our state. Their lives, their 
achievements, and the institutions which they created, were studied and 
honored by thousands of loyal descendants throughout Indiana. 

On the eve of Indiana's one hundredth anniversary the schools of 
the state devoted special attention to the study of Indiana history. 
Clubs, societies, church organizations, and other groups all took up the 
subject, and literally thousands of Hoosiers were eagerly seeking and 
reading the story of Indiana's development. The knowledge gained at 
that time created a much greater feeling of reverence and respect for 
our pioneers than had ever been noted before. It also gave rise to a 
general demand for the study and preservation of Indiana history. 

In most of the counties of the state, local historical celebrations 
were held during the centennial year. This occasion was used for de- 
veloping a keener interest in the study of local history. The program 



366 Year Book 

usually consisted of a pageant or historical revue, and gave opportu- 
nity for the children of this generation to see enacted again those 
scenes that attended the early settlements of their county and state. 
As they sat and watched the characters who represented the first set- 
tlers of their community pass before them in review, they saw their own 
history unfolding in their very presence. And a resolution was made 
to study anew the lives of those noble men and women, the first to break 
a pathway through the wilderness and make possible a future state. 
The interest aroused by the centennial celebration in 1916 in creating a 
new appreciation for Indiana history was state-wide, and a great im- 
petus was given for further promoting its study by all loyal Hoosiers. 

CENTENNIAL PUBLICATIONS 

One of the duties of the Indiana Historical Commission during the 
centennial year was that of publishing documentary source material, 
and other material relating to Indiana history. The following four 
publications appeared as a result of the state's centennial: 

CONSTITUTION MAKING IN INDIANA (two volumes): By 
Dr. Charles Kettleborough of the Indiana Bureau of Legislative In- 
formation. 

Volume One presents the historical background, from the cession 
of the Northwest Territory to the United States', covers the Constitu- 
tion of 1816 and the attempts at amendment up to 1850. Volume Two 
treats of the Constitution of 1850-1851 and the attempts to amend up to 
1916. Copious and valuable notes are included in both volumes. The 
Mississippi Valley Historical Review in referring to this publication, de- 
scribes it as "an important contribution to American political insti- 
tutions." 

INDIANA AS SEEN BY EARLY TRAVELERS: By Harlow 
Lindley of Earlham College. 

This volume contains selections from valuable diaries and docu- 
mentary publications which give the impressions recorded by early 
travelers who visited in Indiana. The material contained in this volume 
is confined almost entirely to the letters, diaries, and journals, preceding 
the year 1830. The Indiana Magazine of History in speaking of this 
publication describes it as a collection of source material which presents 
a vivid picture of early Indiana. A brief account of the individual 
writers precedes the various journals contained in this volume. 

THE PLAY PARTY IN INDIANA: By Leah Jackson Wolford. 

This volume contains an interesting study of the play-party as a 
part of the folk customs of early Indiana pioneers. A large collection 
of games and songs, sung and played by the early settlers is contained 
in the volume. This publication has met with wide-spread interest and 
has received favorable comment from numerous critics. It is a distinct 
contribution to Indiana folk-lore history. 

THE INDIANA CENTENNIAL (1916): Edited by Harlow 
Lindley. 

This volume contains a complete account of the centennial celebra- 
tions, both state and county, that were held throughout Indiana during 



I 



Historical Commission 367 

the centennial year of 1916. The centennial address of Governor 
Ralston, addresses made by the members of the historical commission, 
and copies of the three state pageants are included in full. The volume 
stands as a monument to the centennial workers, and will be the refer- 
ence book for historical pageants and centennial celebrations held 
throughout the state in future years. 

INDIANA WORLD WAR RECORDS 

Since the close of the World War the historical commission has been 
devoting most of its attention to the work of collecting and compiling 
the official war history of Indiana. Realizing the great importance of 
collecting these official records before they are lost, the commission turned 
its attention directly to this work immediately following the signing of 
the armistice, and has succeeded in bringing together the most complete 
collection of war records ever assembled in the state. 

Few states can claim a greater number of signal honors for the 
part their citizens played in the World War than Indiana. Herewith 
are noted only a part of the honors officially credited to the Hoosier 
state: 

It was an Indiana boy, James Bethel Gresham of Evansville, who 
was first of the American forces to give his life on foreign soil after 
the United States army started its drive against the enemy. He was 
killed in action on the morning of November 3, 1917, near Artois, France, 
in the first trench raid by the Germans on the American forces. 

It was an Indiana boy, Sergeant Alexander Arch of South Bend, 
who fired the first shot from the American forces into the German 
trenches. The shot was fired at 6:05 o'clock on the morning of October 
23, 1917. 

The "Greatest Hero of the World War" was an Indiana boy. Captain 
Samuel WoodfiU of Belleview, Jefferson County. When General John J. 
Pershing and the other generals of the American army were requested 
to select "the outstanding hero of the armed forces of the United 
States," to officially represent the ex-service men in honoring America's 
"Unknown Dead" on the anniversary of Armistice Day, November 11, 
1921, they picked this Hoosier soldier. For bravery in action he received 
the Congressional Medal of Honor; the Legion of Honor; the Croix de 
Guerre with palm, and the Insignia of the Order of Prince Danilo the 
First of Montenegro. His citation reads: "For conspicuous gallantry 
and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the 
enemy at Cunel, France, October 12, 1918. While he was leading his 
company against the enemy his line came under heavy machine gun fire 
which threatened to hold up the advance. 

"Followed by two soldiers at twenty-five yards, this officer went out 
ahead of his first line toward a machine gun nest and worked his way 
around its flank, leaving two soldiers in front. 

"When he got within ten yards of the gun it ceased firing and four 
of the enemy appeared, three of whom were shot by Lieutenant Wood- 
fill. The fourth, an officer, rushed at Lieutenant WoodfiU, who at- 
tempted to club the officer with his rifle. After a hand-to-hand struggle, 



368 Year Book 

Lieutenant Woodfill killed the officer with his pistol. His company 
thereupon continued to advance until shortly afterward another machine 
gun nest was encountered. 

"Calling on his men to follow, Lieutenant Woodfill rushed ahead of 
his line in the face of heavy fire from the nest, and when several of the 
company appeared above the nest he shot them, capturing three other 
members of the crew and silencing the gun. 

"A few minutes later this officer for the third time demonstrated con- 
spicuous daring by charging another machine gun position, killing five 
men in one machine gun pit with his rifle. He then drew his revolver 
and started to jump the pit when two other gunners only a few yards 
away turned their gun on him. Failing to kill them with his revolver, 
he grabbed a pick lying nearby and killed both of them. Inspired by the 
exceptional courage displayed by this officer, his men pressed on to their 
objective under severe shell and machine gun fire." 

It was a Hoosier soldier, Major General Omar Bundy of Newcastle, 
Indiana, who as commander of the Fifth American Army Corps stopped 
the German drive at Belleau Wood in the Chateau Thierry Sector in 
June, 1918. In General Bundy, "The hero of Belleau Wood," Indiana has 
furnished its greatest fighting soldier since the days of General Lew 
Wallace and General Henry W. Lawton. When the honor decorations 
for conspicuous bravery were officially conferred upon General Bundy, he 
was referred to as "The commander of the second division, who made 
of his unit a division of the first order and brilliantly contributed by his 
stubborn defense and his desperate counter-attacks in stopping the Ger- 
man offensive in front of Chateau Thierry." It was to this brave Hoosier 
soldier, who on June 10-12, 1918, the honor fell for turning the tide that 
threatened Paris, and who saved civilization. 

It was to Indiana that official credit was given by the adjutant gen- 
eral of the United States army for having supplied in proportion to its 
population, more volunteers to the U. S. army (24,148) than any other 
state in the Union. Indiana furnished a total of 121,000 men to the 
United States army during the war and over 8,000 men for the United 
States navy. 

Three thousand three hundred and fifty-four (3,354) sons and fifteen 
(15) daughters from Indiana paid the supreme sacrifice in the World 
War. A special volume known as the INDIANA GOLD STAR HONOR 
ROLL, dedicated to the memory of these heroes has been issued by the 
Indiana Historical Commission. (See below.) 

Three hundred and forty-six (346) Hoosiers were cited for bravery 
in action, for the performance of extraordinary heroism while in line 
of duty. One hundred and twenty-three (123) Hoosiers received Dis- 
tinguished Service Crosses; two hundred and thirteen (213) received 
Croix de Guerre Citations, while ten others received decorations from 
other foreign governments. An examination of the three hundred and 
forty-six citations granted, shows that not a few received as many as 
three medals for bravery. 

Indiana men and women loaned the government $498,000,000, ap- 
proximately one-half billion dollars ($451,000,000 for the purchase of 



Historical Commission 369 

liberty bonds, and $47,000,000 for the purchase of war savings and thrift 
stamps), as their share in financing the war. 

And in conclusion it was a Hoosier lad, Earl Capper of Decatur 
County, who, when the war was over and when the terms of the peace 
treaty drawn up between the Allies and the German nation were ready 
for signing, sent forth the message on the morning of June 23, 1919, 
to all the world, announcing that Germany had signed. Young Capper, 
together with two other Hoosier soldiers, Claude M. Herr of Castleton, 
and Paul R. Stephenson of Indianapolis, were attached to the 39th Serv- 
ice Company, Signal Corps, in the office of the Commercial Cable Com- 
pany, LeHavre, France. When the plenipotentiaries announced that 
the articles of the treaty of peace had been signed, the honor of ticking 
out the message on the tape which was carried by cable and telegraph 
to all points of the world, fell to the three Hoosier lads who were at that 
moment stationed in the cable office. It was they who sent forth these 
glad tidings to the war-weary people in the four parts of the globe. 

It is doubtful whether another state in the union can claim so many 
honors as can Indiana for the part her people played in the great World 
War. 

In collecting the war records, the historical commission has been 
ably assisted by local county historical societies, and special war history 
committees. Before the State Council of Defense was disbanded in 1919, 
the historical commission had arranged for taking over the work of gath- 
ering up the valuable records of this organization, and the dozen or more 
subsidiary committees appointed during the period of the war to carry 
on civilian war work. The historical commission succeeded in saving the 
complete records of the State Council of Defense, including all letters, 
correspondence, telegrams, official bulletins, and the minutes of all the 
meetings, which collection will in years to come be the chief source of 
study for the part played by Indiana in the World War. The same can 
be said regarding the collection of all papers, letters, correspondence, 
telegrams, statistical and financial sheets, relating to the history of the 
five liberty loan drives in Indiana. These records will be the source 
from which Indiana's part in the great work of financing the war will 
be studied. 

In addition to the state records just mentioned the historical com- 
mission has been able with the aid of the local county historical societies 
and war history committees, to collect and permanently preserve the 
more valuable records relating to the part played by the individual coun- 
ties in the World War. Included in the county war histories are to be 
found chapters relating to the activities of the county council of defense, 
the local draft board, the reports of the five liberty loan drives, the work 
of the Red Cross, the fuel administrator's report, the food administrator's 
report, — in short, reports covering all of the civilian organizations that 
helped in the work of fighting the war. These special committees, or- 
ganized at the outbreak of the World War to carry on special civilian war 
work, played their part just as nobly as did the men who wore the uni- 
form, and their records from the fundamental part of the state's official 
war history. At this date (December 1, 1921) sixty-two of the ninety- 

24—19980 



370 Year Book 

two counties have completed their war histories. It is the plan of the 
historical commission to have every county in the state compile its war 
history before the close of another year. ' 

WORLD WAR PUBLICATIONS 

In addition to collecting- the records of the various organizations 
that carried on war work, the historical commission has undertaken the 
publication of a series of volumes relating specifically to Indiana's part 
in the great world conflict. The first of these publications issued by the 
historical commission is the "Gold Star Honor Roll." This volume con- 
tains the names, pictures, and biographies of 3,354 men and fifteen 
nurses from Indiana, who paid the supreme sacrifice during the World 
War. Work upon the volume was begun early in 1919, and with the 
co-operation of local communities in the diiferent counties the commis- 
sion was able to prepare the most complete and the only official. Gold 
Star list of the state. Had work on the records of the Gold Star men 
been delayed for a period of three, four, or five years, it is doubtful 
whether more than fifty per cent of the photographs of the men could 
have been obtained. Fortunately the historical commission was able to 
procure pictures of all except about one hundred. 

The volume is the first of its kind in the United States, and is a 
most fitting memorial to the memory of the men and women from Indiana 
who gave their lives for their country's service in the World War. On 
the pages of this volume will be preserved as long as time shall last, the 
stories of their bravery, and their images, which will always stand as an 
inspiration to others in giving their lives for a patriotic cause. By a 
special act of the legislature one copy of the volume was presented to 
each family in the state who lost a son or daughter while in service. 
Also one copy has been placed in each of the public libraries in Indiana 
and in each of the college, university, and normal school libraries of the 
state. "Of all the publications that have come to our notice devoted to 
the service of American soldiers in the World War, none is more attrac- 
tive and appropriate than the Gold Star Honor Roll recently published 
by the Indiana Historical Commission. This book includes photographs 
and biographies of more than three thousand Indiana soldiers who died 
in the World War. Almost every brief biography is accompanied by a 
portrait. The work is well executed and attractively and substantially 
bound. Extensive correspondence and careful editorial work were nec- 
essary in its production. It is in every way highly creditable to the 
Indiana Commission." — Ohio Archeological and Historical Quarterly, 
July, 1921. 

HISTORY OF THE LIBERTY LOANS IN INDIANA 

The second volume to be issued by the Indiana Historical Commission 
will contain a history of the five liberty loan drives, and the war savings 
and thrift stamp campaigns in Indiana. The manuscript material for 
this volume is now being prepared by Walter S. Greenough of Indian- 
apolis. Mr. Greenough acted as publicity director of the state liberty 



Historical Commission 871 

loan organization during the entire period of the war, and by reason of 
his acquaintance with the system of banking, finance, and economics, 
together with the position he held during the drives, peculiarly qualifies 
him for the work of preparing this volume. Bankers, economists and 
historical students who have examined the manuscript pronounce it one 
of the best treatises written on the general subject of finance during the 
war period. It is planned to publish this volume during the coming 
year. 

Special reports covering the activities of the State Council of De- 
fense, the State Selective Service Board, the State Food Administration, 
the State Fuel Administration, the war relief work in Indiana, and other 
organizations that engaged in war work are now being prepared. While 
the historical commission may not be able to publish all of this mate- 
rial within the next year, nevertheless it is of the greatest importance 
that the records and reports relating to the activities of these war time 
organizations be compiled now and permanently preserved as source 
material for Indiana history. 

COUNTY WAR HISTORIES 

In addition to encouraging the publication of volumes relating pri- 
marily to state war work, the Indiana Historical Commission has also 
been devoting a great part of its time toward helping the counties to 
prepare for publication their county war histories. These volumes in- 
clude a report on the work of the county council of defense, the county 
draft board, the liberty loan drives, the Red Cross work, the Y. M. C. A., 
the Knights of Columbus, the war welfare, the boys' working reserve, 
and all other organizations that participated in war work. 

In many of the counties certain forward-looking men and women 
have provided the funds for publishing these reports after they have 
been prepared. In order to give greater encouragement to this work, 
which should be supported by the entire citizenship of the county, the 
1921 session of the state legislature w^as requested to pass a law author- 
izing the boards of county commissioners to "expend a sum not to exceed 
one thousand dollars ($1,000) for the publication of its county war his- 
tory. House Bill No. 254, approved March 11, 1921, authorizes such 
action on the part of the board of county commissioners. The act also 
provides that one copy of the war history shall be placed in each school 
library and public library of the county, and one copy shall be filed with 
each post of the American Legion. Remaining copies of the war history 
are to be sold at the actual cost of printing, binding and publication, and 
money derived from the sale of such copies shall be turned into the gen- 
eral fund of the county treasurer. The county auditor is named as the 
custodian of the funds, and he shall have charge of the sale of all 
copies of the war history. 

By this special act of the legislature provision has now been made 
for enabling every county in Indiana to publish and distribute its county 
war history. It is expected that all of the counties will take advantage 
of this act, and that the next year will witness the publication of county 
war histories all over Indiana. 



I 



872 Yeab Book 

county aid for historical societies 

In carrying on county historical work throughout the state there 
has long been felt the need of public support. Efforts made to build up 
collections of local historical material, or to preserve such historical ma- 
terial and relics that came to light within the county, have in years past 
met with comparatively little encouragement. However, the importance 
of the work justified those who had at heart the historical interests 
of their county in continuing their efforts toward seeking public sup- 
port. Finally in 1901 an act was passed which authorized county com- 
missioners to appropriate money for county historical societies where 
such organizations had been in continuous existence for a period of five 
years or more. The same act authorizes the erection of a building for 
the housing of a county historical society and its papers and relics, and 
provision is made for holding the property in the name of the county 
society. 

Of much more importance however, to the support of local historical 
work is the act passed during the 1921 session of the Indiana General 
Assembly, known as Senate Bill 190, approved March 11, 1921. Accord- 
ing to the provisions of this act, county commissioners are now author- 
ized to employ a curator, whose duties shall be that of collecting, preserv- 
ing, cataloging and printing historical material that is of interest to 
the county. Authority was also granted to the County Council to ap- 
propriate the sum of $1,500 annually for the purpose of paying the 
curator's salary, and for the publication of historical material. 

Historical societies that have been in continuous existence for a 
period of five years or more, and which have been occupying rooms or 
a building provided for by the county, are now permitted to take ad- 
vantage of this act. Of the $1,500 authorized for the support of county 
historical work, not more than $900 can be paid to the curator. The 
remainder of the sum appropriated is to be used for collecting, compil- 
ing and publishing historical material. 

According to the provisions of this act, counties are now able to 
take up their county historical society work on a much broader, scale 
than heretofore. The idea has at last been recognized that the study 
and appreciation of local and state history is of sufficient importance 
to justify public support. It is with the view of further encouraging 
this movement that the above act was passed. Counties will now be able 
to build up a valuable collection of historical material, and will in time 
be in position to publish the more important papers. In counties like 
St. Joseph, Jefferson, Washington, Allen and Henry, counties that have 
been taking the lead in the work of collecting local history, steps should 
be. taken at once looking toward the publication of much of the mate- 
rial that has been collected, and for building up a more extensive collec- 
tion of historical documents. In numerous instances throughout the 
state, papers and reports of great historical value to the history of Indi- 
ana have been prepared, but for lack of funds have never been printed 
or made available to the public. Also numerous historical relics, books, 
and papers of great value, heirlooms and mementoes left by the pioneers 
of our state have been found, but because there has been no special fund 
to draw upon for building up a county historical collection, a great part 



Historical Commission 373 

of the material has already been lost. An opportunity is now offered 
for enlisting public aid in this work, and every county in Indiana should 
avail itself of the support provided for in this act. 

The movement for the organization of county historical societies; 
has taken on renewed interest during the last year. The fact is becom- 
ing widely recognized that the only successful way in which our local 
history can be collected, preserved, and published, is by having an activcy 
wide-awake county historical society, organized for the purpose of doing' 
this special work. The societies must have a vital interest in the cause' 
of local histoiy, should be intensely devoted to the work of collecting, 
preserving, and publishing papers and documents relating to the history 
of the county. The public support which is now authorized enables 
the counties to take up the work in dead earnest, and the organization of 
new societies that are being formed throughout the state is evidence 
of the interest that is being taken in the work. 

Historical societies have already been organized in the following 
counties : 

Allen Laporte 

Bartholomew Morgan 

Cass Orange 

Clinton Owen 

Dearborn Parke 

Decatur Porter 

Franklin Kandolph 

Harrison Ripley 

Henry St. Joseph 

Jackson Spencer 

Jefferson Tippecanoe 

Jennings Tipton 

Johnson Washington 

Knox White 
Lake 

It is the plan of the historical commission to continue the work of 
organizing local county historical societies throughout the state, and it 
is the hope that ultimately every county in Indiana will have a local 
historical society organized and on the job collecting and compiling its 
county history. In no other way can the greatest success be obtained. 

In addition to the county historical societies listed above, special 
mention should be made here of the Southwestern Indiana Historical 
Society, organized in January, 1920. This society includes the eight 
"Pocket Counties" of southwestern Indiana: Posey, Vanderburg, War- 
rick, Spencer, Perry, Gibson, Dubois and Pike. The territorial, political 
and social history of each one of these counties has much in common 
With the history of the other seven counties in the "Pocket," and it 
was felt by those who sponsored the idea of a sectional historical society, 
that greater progress could be made in historical work by combining 
their interests into one organization. This plan of organizing sectional 
historical societies promises to be one of the most successful movements 
for advancing the study of state and local history in Indiana. 



374 Year Book 

annual conference on indiana history 

Another evidence of the growing interest in the subject of Indiana 
history is shown by the annual conferences that are now held on Decem- 
ber 11th, Indiana Admission Day. This movement was launched in 1919 
under the direction of the Society of Indiana Pioneers and the Indiana 
Historical Commission. It was the belief of those who are interested 
especially in the pioneer history of Indiana that in order to best promote 
the study and teaching of history in general, all historical and patriotic 
societies throughout the state should unite their forces in holding an 
annual conference on Indiana history. 

A state-wide conference on Indiana history was held in Indianapolis 
December 10 and 11, 1919. At this meeting representatives from the 
Indiana Historical Society, the Indiana Historical Commission, the In- 
diana State Library Association, the Indiana Department of Conserva- 
tion, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Sons of the 
American Revolution, were present and discussed the contribution that 
each of these different organizations might make in further promoting 
the study and teaching of Indiana history. The success of the' confer- 
ence was such as to cause those in charge of the meeting to provide for 
a second conference the following year. At the 1920 conference the 
subject of "Historical Team Work" was discussed. All of the organiza- 
tions interested in the subject of Indiana history pledged themselves to 
combine their efforts in arousing greater interest in the subject of Indi- 
ana history, and a third conference was held in December, 1921. These 
annual conferences, which bring together men and women from all parts 
of the state and from half a dozen or more organizations vitally inter- 
ested in the subject of our state history, will in time become a great 
factor in popularizing Indiana history, and bringing it to the attention 
of thousands of Hoosiers. 

One of the direct results growing out of the state history confer- 
ence in 1919 was the appointment of a special committee to urge upon 
the State Board of Education, the importance of including a chapter 
on Indiana, history in the history textbook adopted for use in the pub- 
lic schools of this state. This committee met with the State Board of 
Education and presented a resolution requesting that the next textbook 
on American history adopted by the state should include a special chap- 
ter relating to Indiana history. The request was acted upon favorably, 
and in the new adoption of textbooks in February, 1921, the request of 
the committee was complied with. 

In addition to providing for a special chapter, a general outline 
devoted to the subject of local history was also agreed upon. A bibliog- 
raphy on Indiana history to contain not less than thirty titles was also 
included. 

In order to arouse a more universal interest in state and local his- 
tory, an advisory committee was appointed, composed of one member 
from each congressional district in Indiana. The purpose of this ad- 
visory committee is to encourage city and town superintendents, county 
superintendents of schools, township trustees, teachers, and others to 
co-operate in an effort to develop an interest in state and local history. 



Historical Commission • 375 

The committee is appointed by the president of the Society of Indiana 
Pioneers, and it will report to the State Board of Education or the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction the development of interest 
in local history within their community. This joint action on the part 
of the Society of Indiana Pioneers and the State Board of Education will 
have great influence in popularizing our state history, and in bringing 
the story of our state's development to the attention of all public school 
children in Indiana. 

historical and ARCHEOLOGICAL survey of INDIANA 

Another step taken by the historical commission during the last year 
is that of co-operating with the Division of Geology of the Department 
of Conservation, in undertaking a state-wide archeological and historical 
survey. These two departments, co-operating with the national research 
council, have undertaken a survey of the Indiana counties with the 
view of obtaining careful and scientific information regarding Indiana's 
archeological remains and historical material. Outline blue-print maps 
of each county are being prepared by the division of geology, and a 
special questionnaire has been prepared by the historical commission, 
both of which will be used by the committees making the survey. 

The archeological remains that are to be noted in the survey include 
a description of mounds, their shape and state of preservation. Also 
the location and ownership in respect to the township, section and range 
is to be designated, and pictures of the mound and charts or drawings, 
showing the same will be made. In reference to stone mounds, earth- 
works and enclosures, the same information is being sought. The loca- 
tion and names of caves, quarries, gravel pits, burial places and village 
sites are being included in the survey. Also lists of arrow heads, cere- 
monial stones, stone and copper implements, axes, pottery, fleshers, pipes, 
totems, etc., will be made and filed with the reports on archeological 
material. The owner's name on whose land the mounds, earthworks 
and enclosures are found, will be listed and filed with the reports. 

The material to be listed in the historical survey includes a report 
covering such items as: Old books, diaries, directories, ledgers, licenses, 
newspapers, pamphlets, pictures, placards, proclamations, posters, scrap 
books, commissions, antiques, old china, old furniture, clothing, coverlets, 
ceremonial relics, firearms, samplers, tools, implements of agriculture, 
transportation devices, vehicles, war relics, and special acts of the leg- 
islature as applied to the community. 

Also a description of historic regions, such as the name and location 
of the first settlement in the community, historic buildings, old ceme- 
teries, historic sites, battlefields, earliest churches, mill sites, towns that 
"used to be," boundary lines, birthplaces of noted people, markers, camp 
sites, historic trees (peace treaty trees and totem trees), old trails, trade 
routes, and underground railroad stations, are to be listed in the histori- 
cal material called for in the survey. 

It will require perhaps four or five years to complete a survey of this 
kind in Indiana. Special efforts will be made to make the survey as 
nearly accurate as it can be made, and mention will be made of all 



376 Year Book 

archeological and historical material found Within the state. On the 
blue-print maps the sites of archeological remains, and the historical 
points will be listed and explained. One copy of the outline map to- 
gether with a list of all the historical material will be filed with the 
local county historical society in which the survey is made. One copy 
will also be filed with the Indiana Historical Commission, and one with 
the Geology Division of the Department of Conservation. The results 
of such a survey as this will do more toward bringing together the com- 
plete archeological and historical collection of Indiana than any other 
movement ever undertaken within the state. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE INDIANA HISTORICAL COMMISSION FOR 

THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 1920, AND 

ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

Appropriation $8,862 93 

Sale of books 28 00 

Total $8,890 93 

Office expenses, including stamps, filing cases, etc $911 85 

Fort Wayne Printing Company 875 25 

Stafford Engraving Company ' 192 13 

Gold Star photographs 42 51 

Traveling expenses 526 40 

Salaries, including $300 for work done on State Council of Defense 

History 6,332 34 

Blue print 8 40 



Balance reverts to state $2 05 



REPORT OF THE INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 



OFFICERS 



HOWARD E. ENDERS, President, West Lafayette. 
F. A. ANDREWS, Vice-President, Bloomington. 
WALTER N. HESS, Secretary, Greencastle. 
HARRY F. DIETZ, Assistant Secretary, Indianapolis. 
W. k. BLANCHARD, Treasurer, Greencastle. 
FRED J. BREEZE, Editor of Proceedings, Muncie. 
FRANK B. WADE, Press Secretary, Indianapolis. 

HISTORICAL 

The Indiana Academy of Science was founded at Indianapolis on 
December 29, 1885, and was chartered by the state. David Starr Jordan 
was its first president, and Amos W. Butler served as its first secretary. 
In its early years the academy published its annual proceedings at its 
own expense, but in 1894 a state appropriation of six hundred dollars 
made it possible to provide for wider distribution of the scientific work 
of the society. In 1910 the annual appropriation was increased to twelve 
hundred dollars,, and this amount was continued annually until 1919, 
when the funds were not made available through failure at the close of 
the session of the legislature. Special provision was made for payment 
of the 1918 proceedings, and also for printing the 1919 proceedings, but 
the printing of the latter had not progressed to the point that the funds 
could be used before the close of the fiscal year and the amount reverted 
to the general fund of the state. The legislature of 1921 appropriated 
$2,400.00 for the printing of the 1919 and 1920 proceedings. 

The academy is prepared to act for the state, as the National 
Academy does for the general government, as advisor and 'consultant in 
all scientific matters : 

Resolution — Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution: 
"Whereas, the state has undertaken the publication of such proceed- 
ings, the academy will, upon request of the Governor, or of one of the 
several departments of the state, through the Governor, act through its 
council as an advisory body in the direction and execution of any investi- 
gation within its province as stated. The necessary expenses incurred 
in the prosecution of such investigation are to be borne by the state; 
no pecuniary gain is to come to the academy for its advice or direction of 
such investigation." 

"The regular proceedings of the academy as published by the state 
shall become a public document." 

The membership, consisting of fellows, active members, and non- 
resident members, numbers about 360 persons. They are men and 



378 Year Book 

women, representatives of institutions engaged in all branches of scien- 
tific teaching and research. 

The purpose of the Indiana Academy of Science is to bring together 
at the annual meetings the results of scientific activity for the preceding 
year. It also holds a spring meeting at which it does missionary work 
in different parts of the state by visiting localities, interesting individuals 
and observing scientific aspects of the neighborhood. The spring meet- 
ing in 1921 was held at Indianapolis, at which time Bacon's Swamp, 
Holliday Park, Crow's Nest, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Boy Scout Reser- 
vation and Buzzard's Roost were visited. The winter meeting was held 
at Indianapolis in December, 1920. 

The academy publishes an annual report of about five hundred pages, 
known as **The Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science," in 
which is embodied a series of reports of investigations and discussions 
upon scientific matters. The publication has been made possible through 
the generous help of the state, and thus it becomes a public document. 

The academy expends no money for salaries but devotes the whole 
of the annual appropriations to the publication of the proceedings, sub- 
ject to the approval of the State Printing Board. The State Librarian 
distributes the proceedings to the members of the academy, to university, 
college and high school libraries of the state, and to libraries and other 
institutions and individuals on the exchange list of the academy. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

By balance, October 1, 1920 y $0,000 00 

By appropriation 2,400 00 

Total $2,400 00 

To disbursements (1919 proceedings) $1,320 37 

To disbursements (1920 proceedings) 1,289 02 

Total $2,609 39 

By deficit, October 1, 1921 . $209 39 



REPORT OF STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 



MEMBERS OF BOARD 

EDWARD A. STUCKMEYER, President, Indianapolis. 

CHARLES E. REED, Winchester. 

FRANK B. MEYER, Gary. 

LAWSON J. COOKE, Goodland. 

BURTON CASSADAY, Secretary, West Terre Haute. 

ORGANIZATION 

The Indiana Board of Pharmacy was created in 1899. It consists 
of five registered pharmacists of recognized experience and ability, 
actually engaged in the retail drug business, appointed by the Governor 
for terms of four years, not more than three of whom may belong to 
the same political party. Vacancies in the membership of the board are 
filled by the Governor; no person connected with any school of pharmacy 
is eligible to serve and the Governor may remove any member for cause. 
The board elects a president and a secretary from among its own mem- 
bers, who hold office for one year. The regi^lar meetings of the board 
are held quarterly on the second Mondays of January, April, July and 
October. Additional meetings may be held if required for the necessary 
transaction of business. Each member of the board, except the secre- 
tary, receives as compensation the sum of $5 per day for each day 
actually engaged in the work, together with the necessary expenses. The 
salary of the secretary is $1,500 per year and the necessary expenses. 

DUTIES 

The duties of the board of pharmacy are to enforce the provisions of 
the drug and narcotic laws of the state; to examine and license pharma- 
cists; to register pharmacists who continue in good standing; to revoke 
the licenses of registered pharmacists for cause ; to promulgate such rules 
and regulations as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
drug laws, and to enforce the drug and narcotic laws and conduct prose- 
cutions against persons guilty of violating its provisions. 

REGISTRATION OF PHARMACISTS 

By virtue of the provisions of the drug law, no person is permitted 
to conduct a store or pharmacy in which drugs, chemicals or medicines 
are sold at retail unless there is a registered pharmacist in charge. The 
purpose of this law is to protect and safeguard the lives of the people of 
the state by prohibiting the sale of poisons or compounds containing poi- 
sons by persons who do not have a scientific knowledge of the nature and 
properties of drugs or the proper filling of prescriptions. For the pur- 
pose of ascertaining the scientific knowledge and other necessary quali- 



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380 Year Book 

fication of persons who wish to engage in the business of selling drugs 
and compounding prescriptions, the State Board of Pharmacy holds four 
examinations each year, on the second Mondays of January, April, July 
and October, at which candidates may appear and be examined. The 
law recognizes two grades of pharmacists, which are known respectively 
as registered pharmacists and registered assistant pharmacists. 

Registered Pharmacists. To be licensed as a registered pharmacist a 
candidate must be at least twenty-one years of age, must produce evi- 
dence of having had not less than four years' experience under a regis- 
tered pharmacist and in a pharmacy or drug store where physicians' 
prescriptions are compounded, must pass a satisfactory examination and 
must pay a prescribed fee. Beginning with January 1, 1920, no one 
will be eligible for examination unless he has had two years in high 
school or its equivalent and holds a diploma of graduation from a col- 
lege of pharmacy of recognized standing; except that any person licensed 
as an apprentice pharmacist or who holds the degree of registered assist- 
ant pharmacist is not affected by this law. 

Registered Assistant Pharmacist. The same regulations apply to 
candidates for registered assistant pharmacist license except that he 
must be not less than eighteen years of age and must have had not less 
than one year's experience. The requirements so far as high school and 
college of pharmacy are concerned apply the same as for registered 
pharmacists. 

Time actually spent in a college of pharmacy, if graduated there- 
from, is taken by the board in lieu of an equal amount of time spent 
in a pharmacy; to the extent of two school years in case of applicants 
for registered pharmacist and not less than six months in case of appli- 
cants for registered assistant pharmacist. 

Reciprocal Licenses. The board may, in its discretion, issue licenses 
of the grade of registered pharmacist or as registered assistant pharma- 
cist, Vithout examination, to any person who produces a certificate of 
registration of equal grade from any other state which requires a degree 
of competency and experience equal to that required of applicants in 
this state. 

Registration. All licenses to pharmacists and assistant pharmacists 
are issued for a period of two years, or the unexpired portion thereof, 
preceding the next regular date of registration. Any person who desires 
to continue as a pharmacist may do so by registering with the board 
within thirty days after the expiration of his former license. 

Registration Fees. The fees for registered pharmacists are as fol- 
lows: Examination, $5.00; re-registration, $2.00; registration by cer- 
tificate from another state, $15.00. The fees for registered assistant 
pharmacists are as follows: Examination, $3.00; re-registration, $1.00; 
registration by certificate from another state, $5.00. All fees are pay- 
able to the secretary of the board with the application. 

Revocation of Licenses. The pharmacy board has the authority to 
revoke the license of any pharmacist for violation of the drug laws of the 
state. 



Board of Pharmacy 881 



ENFORCEMENT OF DRUG LAW 



The important provisions of the drug laws of the state which the 
board of pharmacy is authorized to administer are the following: To 
see that each store or pharmacy in which drugs, chemicals or medicines 
are sold at retail is in charge of a registered pharmacist; that no drug 
store or pharmacy distributes samples of medicine from house to house 
or gives them away to children Under sixteen years of age; that no 
cocaine, alpha or beta eucaine, opium, morphine or heroin, cannabis 
indica or any salt or derivative of any such drugs or any prescriptions 
containing them are sold at retail except by registered pharmacists, and 
then only upon the written prescription of a licensed physician or den- 
tist, and to enforce the laws relative to the sale of liquor by druggists. 

With the disappearance of the whiskey drug stores from the state 
the business of the balance is of a very high standard. The narcotic 
evil is in a great measure disappearing. Many of the druggists have 
announced their intention of discontinuing the handling of narcotics 
entirely. 

There is not the quantity of narcotics used by physicians that there 
was formerly, judging from the prescriptions written by them. The 
number of addicts is now almost a negligible quantity. This condition 
has been brought about by constant surveillance, and the system of 
reports required of each druggist who handles any at all. A few more 
years will see the end of narcotics except as used in a legitimate way. 

Two narcotic inspectors were appointed September 1st and are ac- 
tively engaged in calling on druggists all over the state and making 
special visits where a question arises regarding violation of narcotic 
laws. 

WORK OF BOARD 

During the year ending September 30, 1921, four regular meetings 
and four special meetings of the board were held for transaction of 
business and for the examination of applicants for the grades of reg- 
istered pharmacist and registered assistant pharmacist. 

One hundred and twenty-nine applicants for the grade of regis- 
tered pharmacist were examined; of this number eighty-two were suc- 
cessful, and nine granted assistant registers. The general average at- 
tained was 75 per cent. Sixty applicants for the grade of assistant 
pharmacist were examined. Of this number forty-six were successful. 
The general average, attained was 75 per cent. 

The total number of persons examined was one hundred and eighty- 
nine. 

Total number of registered pharmacists is 3,787, and total number 
of assistant registered pharmacists is 305. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $6,020 99 

Receipts i 9,141 00 

Total $15,161 99 

Disbursements 5,986 27 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 $9,175 72 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF EMBALMERS 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

J. M. CHAPPELL, Kendallville, President. 

J. P. RAGSDALE, Indianapolis, Vice-President. 

J. U. MAYNARD, Winchester, Secretary-Treasurer. 

M. B. STULTS, Huntington. 

HARRY M. ALLEN, Peru. 

In 1901, by an act of the legislature, the embalmers of the state 
were placed under the control of a board of practical embalmers; previ- 
ous to that time they were under the supervision of the State Board of 
Health. This board consists of five members, who are appointed by the 
Governor, and whose term of office is for four years. 

It has been the custom and duty of the board to act at all times in 
conjunction and in full harmony with the State Board of Health to 
obtain and maintain the best sanitary conditions, both by direct work 
and supervision, and by granting licenses only to those who prove them- 
selves competent to look after such matters in a scientific way. 

There are at present 1,651 licenses in force in the state, and it has 
been the aim at all times to keep the class up to the highest standard of 
proficiency. 

The Indiana State Board is self-sustaining in every way, and all 
expenses arising are paid from funds derived from the examination and 
reciprocal fees and renewals. 

Reciprocal licenses are issued to all other states whose standards 
are equal to the ones required by Indiana. 

Two examinations are held each year, one in the spring and one in 
the fall, and a general average of 75 per cent is required to pass. The 
examinations are on anatomy, bacteriology, sanitation and disinfecting, 
and practical work in embalming, etc. 

' FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

RECEIPTS 

For 1,462 renewals of license $1,462 00 

For 22 information blanks 22 00 

For 98 examination fees 540 00 

For 20 reciprocal fees 275 00 

For 26 reinstatement fees 130 00 

Interest on monthly deposits 1 60 

Total $2,430 60 

EXPENDITURES 

To per diem to members of board, salary of secretary, postage, etc $2,013 55 

RECAPITULATION 

Balance on hand $1,379 20 

Receipts 2,430 60 

$3,809 80 
Expenditures 2,013 55 



Balance $1,796 25 



REPORT OF STATE BOARD OF EXAMINATION AND 
REGISTRATION OF NURSES 



NELLIE G. BROWN, R. N., Robert W. Long Hospital, President. 
IDA J. McCASLIN, R. N., Lebanon, Ind., Secretary. 
ELIZABETH SPRINGER, R. N., Huntington Co. Hospital, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 
KATHERINE McMANUS, R. N., Greensburg, Ind. 
LOUISE HAPPEL, R. N., Walker Hospital, Evansville, Ind. 

APPOINTMENT AND QUALIFICATIONS OF BOARD 

The State Board of Examination and Registration of Nurses was 
created by an act of 1905 and reorganized by an amendment in 1921. 
By the provisions of this law the reorganization of the board took place 
in July, 1921, by the appointment of two members for one year, two for 
two years, and one for a three-year term, appointments made thereafter 
to be for a three-year term. No person is eligible for reappointment 
who shall have served two terms and not more than three members of 
the board shall be members of the same political party. 

ORGANIZATION AND COMPENSATION OF BOARD 

The board elects annually from their members, a president and a 
secretary, who is also the treasurer. The salary of the secretary is 
fixed by the board at not to exceed $1,500 per year, with expenses in- 
curred in the discharge of her official duties. The other members of 
the board receive $5 per day and necessary expenses when actually 
engaged at meetings of the board, and when on the' discharge of ofiicial 
duties. 

The board is authorized to employ an educational director, who shall 
visit the nursing schools and aid in maintaining good professional stand- 
ards, and in the introduction of progressive technical methods. The 
educational director shall be paid a salary not to exceed two hundred 
dollars a month for the time actually employed and all necessary travel- 
ing and other expenses incurred in the discharge of her official duties. 

No part of the salaries or other expenses of the board are paid out 
of the state treasury. 

DUTIES OP BOARD AND RECIPROCITY 

It is the duty of the board to meet not less frequently than once a 
year to examine the credentials of all applicants for registration under 
this act, and to examine such applicants on the branches taught in the 
training schools for nurses. The registration fee is ten dollars. The 
board has the power to make and establish all necessary rules and regu- 
lations for thg reciprocal recognition of certificates for nurses issued by 



384 Year Book 

other states of registered nurses who have complied with the require- 
ments of the laws of this state. 

It is also the duty of the board to examine applicants for the certif- 
icate of "trained Attendant" according to the provisions of the law. The 
registration fee for such attendants is five dollars. 

CONSTRUCTION OF ACT 

The nurses' registration act is not construed to effect or apply to 
the gratuitous nursing of the sick by friends or members of the family, 
nor does it apply to any person nursing the sick for hire who does not 
in any way assume to be a registered or graduate nurse. 

Any person violating any of the provisions of the nurses' regis- 
tration act is deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and is punishable by a 
fine of not less than twenty-five dollars nor more than fifty dollars for 
the first offense and not less than fifty dollars nor more than one hun- 
dred dollars for each subsequent offense. 

The attendants' registration act is not construed to effect or apply 
to the gratuitous nursing of the sick by friends or members of the fam- 
ily, nor does it apply to any person nursing the sick for hire who does 
not in any way assume to be a trained attendant. 

Any person making unlawful use or display of the title, initials, 
certificate or pin of the trained attendant, shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor and upon conviction shall be fined not more than fifty dollars for 
each offense. 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR REGISTERED NURSES 

Since June 1, 1908, an applicant for registration is required to fur- 
nish satisfactory evidence that he or she is twenty-one years of age, of 
good moral character, has received the equivalent of a common school 
education and has been graduated from a training school for nurses con- 
nected with a hospital approved by the board, where a systematic course 
of three years' instruction is given. 

All nurses who have served as such in the army and navy of the 
United States, and have been honorably discharged are entitled to be 
registered without examination. 

THE FOLLOWING RULES FOR ACCREDITING TRAINING SCHOOLS FOR NURSES 

WERE ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF REGISTRATION AND EXAMINATION OF 

NURSES, JULY 30, 1919, EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1920 

1. The training school for nurses, or the institution of which it is 
a part, must be incorporated, and will be inspected by a member of the 
nurses' examining board upon its receiving formal application for 
registration. 

2. A school for nursing shall be connected with a general or special 
hospital having not less than twenty-five beds for patients and a daily 
average of not less than fifteen patients. The number of student nurses 
in any one school shall not be less than six. 

3. The training school shall require that all applicants be not less 
than eighteen years of age. The training school shall alstf require that 



Board of Nurses' Registration 385 

all applicants furnish the board of nurse examiners proof of graduation 
from a grammar school or its equivalent, using for this purpose student 
nurse application blank as adopted by this board. 

4. A probationary period of not less than three months shall be 
maintained. The course of instruction shall cover at least eight months 
of the year. Two years of the prescribed course must be devoted en- 
tirely to hospital training; the third year, or a part thereof, may be 
spent in recognized colleges, technical schools or with public health organ- 
izations, subject to the approval of the State Board of Registration and 
Examination of Nurses. 

5. Schools of nursing may not place their pupils on special or pri- 
vate cases in the hospital for pay until they have completed their sec- 
ond year, nor for a period exceeding three months during the third 
year. 

6. The hospital shall make necessary provision for conducting a 
school for nurses by providing practical experience in the following de- 
partments of nursing: Medical, surgical, obstetrical (genito-urinary for 
male nurses) , and pediatrics, and shall also give a systematic, theoretical 
course in anatomy, physiology, bacteriology, dietetics, massage, materia 
medica, elementary urinalysis, medical, surgical and gynecological 
nursing, pediatrics, mental and nervous, nursing ethics, obstetrical nurs- 
ing, each student to have the care of not less than six cases, including 
labor and delivery and care of the infant; diseases of eye, ear, nose and 
throat, and infectious diseases, including practical experience, whenever 
possible. 

7. It shall provide proper and adequate facilities for class instruc- 
tion. The class room must be well lighted and provided with students' 
tablet chairs and a good-sized blackboard, a skeleton, a manikin, and 
such additional apparatus as the hospital may be able to afford. There 
must be a demonstration room and demonstration equipment; a diet 
kitchen and the necessary equipment for teaching purposes; the neces- 
sary laboratory equipment for the teaching of chemistry, bacteriology 
and analysis of urine. 

8. Schools of nursing connected with hospitals not providing ade- 
quate opportunities for experience in all the above branches must be- 
come affiliated with institutions approved as giving such experience. 
Nurses shall not be sent out by an accredited school for poA/ during 
training. 

9. (a) No training school shall accept a nurse who has been in 

training elsewhere without written statements in regard 
to preliminary education, health and character, and a 
complete record of previous training signed by the former 
superintendent, 
(b) No person shall be promised any definite amount of credit 
for time spent in previous. training until said person shall 
have served a minimum probation of three months. 
Amount of credit given shall be governed, in the judg- 
ment of the superintendent of nurses, by applicant's skill 

26—19380 



386 Year Book 

and knowledge in practical work as shown during proba- 
tion and by class and lecture work required, in order 
that, upon graduation, applicant will be assured the num- 
ber of hours in practice and theory as set forth in the 
curriculum for an accredited school, 
(c) No credit shall be given for less than six months' previous 
training. Full credit may be given to students of an 
accredited school which had gone out of existence before 
course of training was completed. 
- 10. A record shall be kept of ail students ; entrance requirements, 
ail class, lecture and laboratory work, all practical work, deportment, and 
general ability and efficiency. The superintendent cf an accredited school 
of nursing will be required to submit for each graduate nurse at the 
time of her application for certificate of registration a record of her 
theoretical and practical work and the standings for same while a pupil 
in training. When necessary to arrange for affiliation, record must show 
name of affiliating school, length cf time in each school, number of lec- 
tures and classes, by whom given, grading on examination, practical work 
required in service. 

11. Proper living conditions must be provided for the students. A 
separate building or a building erected for the purpose should be pro- 
vided, with sufficient furniture and closet room for each student, and one 
bath room iand one toilet for each ten students; a general library and a 
reception room; a suitably furnished, clean dining room; food well 
cooked, ample and of sufficient variety, with enough help for prompt 
service. It is essential to have at least one graduate nurse in charge 
of each residence. 

12. All nurses acting as superintendents of hospitals and principals 
of training schools, and all salaried nurses connected with these schools, 
hospitals and sanitarium